10

No, provided the 'garden fabric' is water and air permeable and not thick plastic. Geotextile fabrics are commonly used in areas with existing planting, usually with some kind of decorative mulch on top. If such a membrane were laid with stones on top and left for some years, it's likely that the area would need to be improved by digging over and ...


10

Rotating some plants while in bud may cause flower stem weakening and bud drop, as in Schlumbergeras. but generally, if the light source tends to be one sided, it is a good idea to rotate the pot. You can do this at any time, but if you use a schedule, you get the most balanced growth. I've even made my own rotators for my small windowsill plants, equipped ...


10

Etiolation is long, spindly growth caused by poor lighting conditions. Plants will tend to be more yellowish because of chlorophyll lack. You will see it at its worst when trying to greenhouse start plants before you have enough sunlight to properly enable photosynthesis. The plants know they're light starved and are trying to grow tall enough to get it. ...


9

We get a lot of questions about member of the citrus family. Some varieties will flower and set fruit indoors. So, yes, you can grow citrus indoors but they are challenging to keep looking nice at the size of your plant without a greenhouse. is the pot the right size? This depends on whether it is pot bound or not. It sounds about right. This is part of ...


8

The cost effective solution for quite some time is and has been and probably will be to move further "towards the equator" and ship "away from the equator", or for a few things that don't ship well and have adequate profit margin grow in a greenhouse, not a basement, sometimes with supplemental lighting. Basement growing tends to be concentrated on high-...


8

There are various devices on the market for measuring sunlight - the link below contains three or four different ones, although I can't speak for the accuracy of any of them. Although it's easy to judge that an open, south facing area with no surrounding buildings or tall trees will receive any sun that's going, within the average garden or planted area, it'...


8

On the assumption you mean plants suitable for pots outdoors, lemon scented plants such as Citronella and Lemon Balm are good. Plants offered for sale under the name citronella vary - the one to look for is Cymbopogon nardus, or Citronella winterianus. Cymbopogon does not like cold temperatures, and should be fine with your climate, but regular (possibly ...


7

Yes, the colour will block some light, but not too much. The only reason they sell these green plastic coverings on a frame is because they're thought to be more aesthetically pleasing than looking at clear plastic, and because the material they're made from is somewhat tougher than clear plastic.


7

Does the basil on the left side have any chances of survival? It doesn't seem likely, but there is still some green on the leaves. The plant on the left side is too far gone. It will never fully recover, and should be disposed of. The plant looks like it either took some cold, or got basil fusarium wilt. I think the latter is unlikely, but I'd keep that ...


7

Two in a 5 gallon pot is going to be pretty cramped. If they are going to live in the pot their whole lives they will choke each other and you'll potentially get less production than you would from a single plant. Your bamboo setup could be more open at the top but what you have should work, when the plant gets to the top it'll train outside the sticks and ...


7

On the assumption you mean indoors in the sun, it would be best if it wasn't in full, hot sun all day because it might affect the roots - the glass may magnify the sun's rays and cause burning, and will certainly cause a fair amount of condensation on the glass under the bulb. A little sun is fine though, and yes, you can and should leave it as it is in its ...


7

I don't know how accurate it would be, but if you download 'Google Earth' you can make it show you the passage of the sun and shadows based on it's rendering of buildings and trees. It would be something completely free that would give you an idea of the sunlight in that area. It seems to be able to go forward or backward in time. I don't know how far. I ...


7

Well I wouldn't worry about drying it out first - simply tip it out of its pot, preferably wearing gloves, carefully, and with any luck, most of the wet soil will fall off immediately anyway. The plant appears to be quite small for the size pot its in, so its unlikely to be full of roots. They're quite forgiving of being potted on, but have a pot and your ...


7

Do they prefer it? No, not really. Plants have evolved to grow and orient themselves to get the most light in any given conditions. It could even be argued that turning them away from this orientation reduces their overall light exposure to some degree (while they re-orient again), but the overall effect is likely negligible. But there is another reason to ...


6

The answer is the one I hate the most: it depends... Factors influencing your decision include: aesthetics: glass looks better than plastic if you are putting a greenhouse close to your house local climate: if it gets cold where you are then the material best suited for the snow load and that provides the most heat retention will be a better choice even if ...


6

Well it's filtered sunlight, so that counts as partial or dappled shade, just about. There may be increased ambient light levels because of the reflected light off the pool, and possibly from the hard surfacing material round the pool if its a pale colour, but that's still not direct sunlight. Even so, that effect is probably enough to stick to plants that ...


6

I'm sorry I don't know the cause of your damage, but I have a lot of experience with sedums, and can reassure you that a healthy plant can grow even if the top is damaged, dead, or broken off; and even if the roots have come out of the soil and completely dried up. I live in Massachusetts, growing zone 6, (-10°F, -23°C) and have a number of varieties of ...


6

If you can manage to get a few marigolds, plant those. They thrive on a lot of sunshine, can be grown in pots, and are good at repelling mosquitoes and most other insect pests. The beautiful flowers are a bonus.


6

I'm also in zone 6A (Massachusetts, USA), and have something that works perfectly for me. It is vinca, also called periwinkle. I think mine is vinca minor, but there are a number of varieties, so it might be something else in the same family. As for your criteria: It thrives well in all levels of sun. Some references say it needs mostly shade, but mine ...


6

It's not going to help. As the sun apparently moves across the sky you're going to have to track where the sun light falls into the room and position mirrors to focus the reflection on your plants. You would need something like a heliostat. The Sunflower Home Heliostat is a good example of what I mean. Better to get plants that don't require much sunlight ...


5

Several of the answers here are incorrect. Green plastic absorbs green light or reflects it which is why it appears green. Green is chosen because if you want to reduce the light intensity to the inside of the greenhouse, you use green because it's not used by the plants to any significant degree. The filtering is not perfect which is why you might still ...


5

I received an answer from an OGrow representative. OGrow is a manufacturer of greenhouses. Me: Can we get an official response on how to choose between the green and clear coverings? I'm mainly going to grow fruit trees and shrubs. Would fruit trees do better with the clear covering because bit provides full sun? OGrow: While we cannot ...


5

What kind of plants are you thinking of growing? I ask, because you mention keeping the weeds down in spring "before planting". If it is an annual bed or a vegetable bed that you will be replanting every year, landscape fabric may not be your best option. If it is a vegetable garden, every veggie you plant will have different spacing requirements, and you ...


5

Solarization: It is a practice that can kill most soil organisms, included the good ones. Solarization basically consists in the following: Release the soil. Remove big weeds and big rocks. Irrigate. Seal the soil with tarps. Wait a little bit (four to twelve weeks). Remove the tarp. Add compost to the solarizated soil in order to restore beneficial ...


5

You can't go wrong with extra light but the real problem is that the plants will grow towards the light. If you are able to turn the grow area once a week or so then yes, take advantage of the natural light. If you cannot turn the grow area then the natural light will cause the plants to lean towards the window and it's a pain and you might as well not ...


5

Yes, low end (less than $100 US) lux meters will work for most measurements, and is a useful tool. Deep shade (too low for the average plant to thrive) is about 1,000 lux. Normal house lighting is about 60-100 lux. Full daylight (not full sun) (good for shade loving plants) is about 10,000–25,000 lux. Direct sunlight (ideal for most plants) is about 32,000–...


5

They like full sun, but don't like temperatures much above 75 deg F. If your temperatures are regularly much higher in full sun, it might be sensible to either move them where there's some protection from midday sun, or provide some shading for them. Moving them out of the sun permanently isn't such a good idea. It depends how long they've been growing ...


5

There are different variables and it depends on what season but generally speaking to get the most light, assuming a rectangular garden. rows should run east to west and your taller plants should be on the north side. You can always use shade cloth to reduce sun if necessary on some plants that can't tolerate that much sun (or put them to the north of ...


5

I'm presented with what looks like two completely opposite issues - the flower has suffered balling, and that is usually caused by damp cool conditions, in particular, rain, but the leaves appear to be suffering from drought/heat. I suppose there might be an explanation - perhaps, when you watered these in to their new pots (and I hope you did) you watered ...


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