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5

I don't think it is "a plant growing from the tree". I think it was actually the last ditch attempt of the tree itself to stay alive. When the white shoot had grown up through the soil it would have turned green in the light as it started to produce chlorophyll. Unfortunately, digging it up won't have increased its chances of survival, even if you replant ...


4

Russian olive has a defence mechanism which automatically sends up shoots when the root is interfered with. Your tree is next to a fence, and if this is a lot line then likely the roots have spread to your neighbour's property, where the neighbour has other ideas for what grows in that yard. There is a huge sprout right by the fence line as if it had a major ...


3

From the leaf shape, the sprouting at the base and its overall pyramidal shape it looks like a Little Leaf Linden or Tilia cordata variety. Tilia is known for its ability to survive heavy pruning and to largely recover from accidents such as these. It looks like someone has already attempted to prune out some large branches, likely designed to rebalance as ...


3

Disclaimer: Under no circumstances can or should a post here be a substitute for qualified on-site medical advice. If any symptoms of poisoning are observed, contact your local healthcare provider. After the update: This is elderberry (Sambucus nigra). The berries contain low doses of cyanogenic glycosides (which produce prussic acid) and lectins. Typical ...


3

It's hard to know until the first flowers appear or the trees get much bigger. The male generally flowers first and produces only pollen. I think right now the size of the specimens, if they have not obviously been pruned, confirms the seller's claim that the smaller one is female since the male plants are much larger when mature. It looks like the producer ...


2

If you are talking just about the red seed clusters, then I've found the best way to preserve them is to dehydrate them. I have spread whole clusters in a single layer on cookie sheets and put them in the oven at its lowest setting with good effect. You'll have to leave them in there for a long time. I had mine in there overnight and they still needed more ...


2

This looks poisonous, if your wife and daughter still feel sick of it, please go find some medical help immediately. This is probably Prunus laurocerasus, which is indeed toxic.


2

Sarah, your avocado has injury from a pest called the "persea mite". If you do an image search on this term you will find a number of images that show the same kind of damage. This article by the California Avocado Growers contains some interesting details about treatment and also a list of other plants which can act as hosts to the same mite. If you have ...


2

Likely one of the branches will take over as the dominant one, but at this stage both can be allowed to progress since it spreads the risk. One or the other might be hurt and if there are multiple shoots it is more likely to survive. Eventually the weaker one can be pruned away once the seedling is firmly established in its new location. Adding it to the ...


2

I would suggest that this is coffee, either arabica or robusta, but the berry stalks appear to be a bit long on this plant. The leaves are shiny and corrugated as expected. Normally coffee cherries are arranged in small whorls tightly clustered around the stem, this one seems to have loose clusters on a branching stalk; from Hortus III it might be Zanzibar ...


2

I do not agree with @ColinBeckingham answer, but I agree with the family. I think it is a Sorbus (whitebeam). Maybe the Sorbus latifolia, or a Sorbus aria. Sorbus has also hybrids.


1

Well it appears to be a Hawthorn or Crataegus, but which one is harder to say. If we look at Hawthorn leaves (say with a Google image search) the viewer will find there is a great variety of shapes, and this one fits with those which are less deeply lobed than most of them. Given the size of the fruit and the size of the tree I would guess C. pinnatifida or ...


1

I'm going with sunflower or pumpkin seedlings. Seeing the adult leaves in a few weeks would be more telling.


1

This looks like sun flower seedlings. Do you have a perrot or caged bird next to the plant that throws seeds into the pot?


1

You're right - the tree IS a dogwood, specifically, Cornus kousa. There are more details here.


1

As it gets bigger it will increasingly be an accident waiting to happen, especially as it could fall over your boundary fence into someone else's property. Whether it is "worth saving" depends on your personal attitude. If you want "a nice looking tree", then get rid of it and plant a new one. On the other hand, any garden can have "nice looking trees," but ...


1

You're in the UK, so unless we've now acquired a range of new fungal infections here that I don't know about yet, this might be Pear Leaf Blister Mite in its advanced stages. The other alternative is canker, but the only hint I can see that it might be that is what appears to be a blackened, shiny shoot protruding from the woody branch lower down from the ...


1

The avocado tree develops a shallow, wide spreading root system. Important roots will be in the top six inches of soil running in all directions. The roots are extremely sensitive to disturbance quite apart from any treatment of the wood post. There is a good chance you disturbed about one quarter to one half of important root volume when digging for the ...


1

I'm late to the discussion here but we have three of these shrubs that the deer ate uniformly on during the winter a few years ago. That next Spring the growth returned but the neighbors thought we'd pruned them into a "phallic" shape. No, the deer did that as we laughed hysterically. The neighborhood actually called them "the penis shrubs". Lol! They ...


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