18

Let me preface this answer by saying that due to my experience in 2016 contrasted with my 2015 experience, I personally think soil conditions and composition, kinds of light and light levels, and how you water your tomatoes may have a profound affect on heat-tolerance. Since the temperature in your area fluctuates so much between day and night, the rules ...


15

Legumes are often used for this purpose. From Wikipedia: Legumes are notable in that most of them have symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria in structures called root nodules. And Within legume nodules, nitrogen gas from the atmosphere is converted into ammonia, which is then assimilated into amino acids (the building blocks of proteins), nucleotides (...


14

For many indoor tropical plants life in the office is slow death. You may feel that way yourself after a bad day! With minimal light levels and good watering practices most tropicals will live for a while. The ones that require high light will draw on their stored resources in the roots and gradually go downhill. Tropicals that tolerate low light levels for ...


14

"Calorically dense"? Look at fruits. Apples, brambles (raspberry/blackberry), currants, strawberries, blueberries. Pie cherries (sweet will depend on your microclimate, pie are hardier), apricots, plums. These folks think you are wrong about soy: The soybean, agriculture's jack-of-all-trades, is gaining ground across Canada. Until the mid-1970s, ...


13

Lemon balm grows nicely in shade and makes a delicious pesto or refreshing accent to beverages. Parsley fares pretty well inside, too, but needs warmer temperatures in order to thrive. Basil actually doesn't do very well in mostly shade; it grows best in full sun. For vegetables, it seems that leafy greens are easy to grow in shade (which helps prevent ...


12

Pollinators are no different than people, they need the same things: food, water, shelter. Food: Some butterflies like a bit of mud to puddle up minerals Shelter: many bees are under-served in the shelter area. Nesting tubes can be as simple as groups of bamboo 4-8" long, smooth with a 5/16" diameter hole. Group them together in a bundle off the ground ...


12

I have read the original NASA studies and the plant industry has misused the findings to sell more stock. Yes, plants do filter air but only when their metabolism is going at full speed, that means lots of light, lots of air circulation. Outside light levels in the tropics are hundreds to thousands of times more intense than anything inside your car. ...


12

Are you familiar with John Jeavons? If not, I highly recommend checking him out. I think his "How to Grow More Vegetables" is still the best resource for this type of information. Unfortunately, I can't find my copy right now, but I do have a smaller, less detailed book of his on hand, and this is what he says: If you compare all of the foods we commonly ...


11

Basically, it is going to depend on the conditions you can maintain in a car, where I live in the great basin temperatures get to 100+f and temps in a car can easily get to 140f which will pretty much kill anything green... another challenge would be physical stability, something like a sansavaria would be pretty hardy through a pretty good temperature ...


11

I recall doing something like this each spring (for several years) growing up, and the plant of choice was Marigolds (planted in a paper cup, as far as I recall) which were grown in class and then taken home at the end. Tough enough, and if grown in the classroom they can also be an educational experience while not taking up any of your growing space at ...


10

We've had a Christmas Cactus (A.K.A. Holiday Cactus) in our bathroom window for over ten years now, with very little watering. I have a picture of the same young plant (in bloom) from the 90's. The name of the plant comes from the bright flowers that bloom during Christmas. It's remarkably unlike traditional cacti and from a distance it doesn't look like ...


10

Consider blueberries, raspberries, blackberries. Blueberries need acid soil, and probably are good deer browse, so I'd do raspberries or blackberries first. I particularly like the "gold" or "yellow" varieties, because birds don't recognize them as food.


10

I live in USDA zone 6b (Southeastern Pennsylvania), and Pawpaws are native growers here. Cold shouldn't be an issue in 6b, but winter length may have some effect. They don't do well in really long winters. As for the conditions. Soil: What I've noticed is that these don't like compacted soil at all. Lawns are not best. Even a mowed meadow can have ...


10

All of the currant family (red, black, gooseberry, lingonberry...) do reasonably well in shade. High and low bush cranberry do well in shade. If you have light shade, look at nut trees. It will be a good while before they produce, but it's worth a look. Hickory, hazelnut, walnut, beechnut are possibilities. I recall that one of persimmon and pawpaw do ...


10

In Northeast Indiana, you're in zone 5. There should actually be quite a lot of stone fruit trees that do well for you, depending on your soil. Stone fruit trees tend to be short-lived in our climate. In my opinion, they're still worth trying. Sour cherries should do very well for you. Montmorency is an easy one to find that does well in zone 5, but North ...


9

If you want all of the plants to be the same type, you would probably want a row of shrubs that grow between 3 and 6 feet tall and don't spread much. Blueberries would do well in your location, if you have an acid soil high in humus. Thornless blackberries would produce lots of fruit, but take a lot of care in pruning and supporting. Grapes need more ...


9

You are going to have a very difficult time growing much in the forest portion of your land. Yes, currants and gooseberries, black raspberries, and possibly sour cherries will tolerate the shade and fruit, but most things will not. As far as vegetables go, you should be able to grow leafy greens - especially in the spring before the trees have leafed out, ...


9

It's not good for that water to be sitting around your foundation like that. I have a few suggestions that vary in the level of time, money, or practicality. The simplest is going to be to add dirt and grade the area away from the house. That's going to depend on what's around you and where you want the water to go. Hopefully, your house isn't in a hole. I ...


9

My two suggestions; Scarlet Runner Beans and the second is Carex testacea or Orange Sedge. Easy to grow, very pretty no matter its age, wonderful to tuck into any plant bed or pot, nice just left in the pot and moved around to dress up a corner or a group of pots. My second suggestion would be Scarlet Runner Beans. Tough, hardy, vigorous, fast...very ...


9

Agricultural folk certainly don't like to have those in their lot, especially if they harvest the grass for their cattle. This makes bundles of straw totally unfriendly to handle once the thistles are dried out. If some of your neighbours enjoy walking barefoot, it's the same, they will be unable to do it any more in their yard. My advice is don't let ...


8

I think your best bet would be to use a mix of various edible "weeds". The great thing about using weeds is that they're typically easy to come by and hard to kill! If you aren't prejudiced against dandelions, they fit all of your criteria. Clover Barley, if you're interested in the juice. (Wheat and other grains may work too.) Stinging nettles, if you don'...


8

Highbush blueberries: They're a reasonable size Make an attractive hedge Attractive fall foliage Blueberries are delicious!


8

Livestock will favour legumes over something taller with more cellulouse to digest. So instead of planting just one kind of plant on the sidewalks, might I suggest you plant two kinds at least. First, something tough and not very delicious like Mondo grass or agapanthus in the background. Then, sprinkled in the foreground, clover or soft grass (e.g. couch) ...


8

(This answer is a summary of my own research and other answers to my question. Thanks for the help.) A few notes: All plants listed below are perennial unless otherwise noted. Interestingly (I guess it should have been obvious) a number of "weeds" fit the criteria quite well... I've noted "forage" below for some items because there will be sheep, chickens, ...


8

Creeping thyme (Thymus serpyllum) works very well for me in USDA zone 4. Tolerates a lot of traffic, small flowers, turns a reddish colour in a mild winter. It is readily available at most nursery centres and once it gets established will self seed. The downsides are that the flowers attracts bees which may not be what you want when you open your car door. ...


8

I see a problem with the size of the area. No groundcover will be so thick it will choke out grass or other wind borne seeds. After a while you will be looking at weeding and with the size of the area this means wading in. Tough... White clover is an excellent idea from @woodchips. I have used it to open up and enrich thick clay soil. There are other ...


8

Those sound like the kind of temperatures we get here in North Texas (today will probably hit 40C - we have a hot week forecast!). Every summer for the last 10 years I've grown peppers in those conditions. Peppers are adapted to heat stress, so they'll appear to wilt during the day (leaves turn floppy like thin paper) but will perk up with a good watering. ...


8

Invasive plants that will be easy to establish and grow enthusiastically all over the fence will need cutting back every year. You might be better off compromising with something somewhat slower to establish and easier to maintain. Something also to consider is dealing with the cuttings of an enthusiastically growing plant. Woody plants are more difficult ...


8

Probably the easiest and most self-sustaining plants to grow are the invasive ones, although you have to be careful, because they are invasive. You may or may not have neighbors that care about this, and there may or may not be laws you’ll need to consider for certain kinds of plants. You might consider growing the following (not all of which are invasive): ...


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