25

Many houseplants can withstand low light intensity. You can google "houseplant". Some of them can clean the air too, according to a research done by NASA. I have a copy of that research in google doc here. Here is a shortlist of houseplants: Hedera helix English ivy Chlorophytum comosum spider plant Epipiremnum aureum golden pothos Spathiphyllum `...


20

Look into native plants that are attractive to wildlife such as birds, butterflies, bees, etc. You can find more information at the Minnesota Native Plant Society website. In Garden Gatherings (PDF) from the University of Minnesota Extension, there is some information on page 6 that relates to your location: Attracting Birds to Your Yard by Jane ...


18

Let me preface this answer by saying that due to my experience in 2016 contrasted with my 2015 experience, I personally think soil conditions and composition, kinds of light and light levels, and how you water your tomatoes may have a profound affect on heat-tolerance. Since the temperature in your area fluctuates so much between day and night, the rules ...


15

Legumes are often used for this purpose. From Wikipedia: Legumes are notable in that most of them have symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria in structures called root nodules. And Within legume nodules, nitrogen gas from the atmosphere is converted into ammonia, which is then assimilated into amino acids (the building blocks of proteins), nucleotides (...


14

For many indoor tropical plants life in the office is slow death. You may feel that way yourself after a bad day! With minimal light levels and good watering practices most tropicals will live for a while. The ones that require high light will draw on their stored resources in the roots and gradually go downhill. Tropicals that tolerate low light levels for ...


14

"Calorically dense"? Look at fruits. Apples, brambles (raspberry/blackberry), currants, strawberries, blueberries. Pie cherries (sweet will depend on your microclimate, pie are hardier), apricots, plums. These folks think you are wrong about soy: The soybean, agriculture's jack-of-all-trades, is gaining ground across Canada. Until the mid-1970s, ...


13

Lemon balm grows nicely in shade and makes a delicious pesto or refreshing accent to beverages. Parsley fares pretty well inside, too, but needs warmer temperatures in order to thrive. Basil actually doesn't do very well in mostly shade; it grows best in full sun. For vegetables, it seems that leafy greens are easy to grow in shade (which helps prevent ...


12

This is not really an answer to your question, but may be a step towards an answer. If you want a plant guild adapted to your area that contains Prunus species, you may want to look at your local forest to understand how it is put together and where Prunus species fit into it. In Vegetation of Wisconsin, John T. Curtis measured the prevailance of plant ...


12

Here are some things I have had experience with in this situation. They all will grow with proper care. thyme leaf lettuce radishes spinach pepper determinate tomatoes baby style carrots tophat blueberries poly variegated cat grass sage oregano strawberries catmint potatoes sweet potatoes


12

Pollinators are no different than people, they need the same things: food, water, shelter. Food: Some butterflies like a bit of mud to puddle up minerals Shelter: many bees are under-served in the shelter area. Nesting tubes can be as simple as groups of bamboo 4-8" long, smooth with a 5/16" diameter hole. Group them together in a bundle off the ground ...


12

I have read the original NASA studies and the plant industry has misused the findings to sell more stock. Yes, plants do filter air but only when their metabolism is going at full speed, that means lots of light, lots of air circulation. Outside light levels in the tropics are hundreds to thousands of times more intense than anything inside your car. ...


12

Are you familiar with John Jeavons? If not, I highly recommend checking him out. I think his "How to Grow More Vegetables" is still the best resource for this type of information. Unfortunately, I can't find my copy right now, but I do have a smaller, less detailed book of his on hand, and this is what he says: If you compare all of the foods we commonly ...


11

Basically, it is going to depend on the conditions you can maintain in a car, where I live in the great basin temperatures get to 100+f and temps in a car can easily get to 140f which will pretty much kill anything green... another challenge would be physical stability, something like a sansavaria would be pretty hardy through a pretty good temperature ...


11

I recall doing something like this each spring (for several years) growing up, and the plant of choice was Marigolds (planted in a paper cup, as far as I recall) which were grown in class and then taken home at the end. Tough enough, and if grown in the classroom they can also be an educational experience while not taking up any of your growing space at ...


10

We've had a Christmas Cactus (A.K.A. Holiday Cactus) in our bathroom window for over ten years now, with very little watering. I have a picture of the same young plant (in bloom) from the 90's. The name of the plant comes from the bright flowers that bloom during Christmas. It's remarkably unlike traditional cacti and from a distance it doesn't look like ...


10

I will recommend two excellent (at least I think they are) low level ground covers, that I have personal experience with (have both of them in my garden), they: Love sun. In the heat of summer (MO, USA: 90°F to 115°F / 32°C to 46°C) they do best if given a good drink of water once a week. Neither of them need to be trimmed. From what I ...


10

Consider blueberries, raspberries, blackberries. Blueberries need acid soil, and probably are good deer browse, so I'd do raspberries or blackberries first. I particularly like the "gold" or "yellow" varieties, because birds don't recognize them as food.


10

All of the currant family (red, black, gooseberry, lingonberry...) do reasonably well in shade. High and low bush cranberry do well in shade. If you have light shade, look at nut trees. It will be a good while before they produce, but it's worth a look. Hickory, hazelnut, walnut, beechnut are possibilities. I recall that one of persimmon and pawpaw do ...


10

In Northeast Indiana, you're in zone 5. There should actually be quite a lot of stone fruit trees that do well for you, depending on your soil. Stone fruit trees tend to be short-lived in our climate. In my opinion, they're still worth trying. Sour cherries should do very well for you. Montmorency is an easy one to find that does well in zone 5, but North ...


9

I don't really know what's the width of the "cracks" you're talking about, but if it's really the narrow cracks I'm assuming it is, where the two pieces of concrete are pretty much still abutting each other, you're going to have difficulty cultivating anything there. The seeds of weeds may blow into small holes and grass shoots may find their way up, but it'...


9

Mike Perry's answer covers much of the food and water aspect. There's also the perspective of shelter. Depending on what kind of birds you want to attract, planting trees and landscaping in a way that provides small birds with protection from predators encourages them to stick around when they've discovered that your yard is a good source of food. A ...


9

Regarding low maintenance, one of the things to bear in mind is choice of compost: in my experience, a peat-based compost dries out much more quickly than a soil-based one (however much moisture-retaining additive the first contains); this involves more frequent watering which, if you have a number of indoor plants, can be fairly time-consuming. Sooner or ...


9

White dutch clover attracts pollinators,fixes nitrogen, is a perennial and will grow in shade. It is best to mow it every couple of weeks to keep it flowering for weeks. Asparagus could be planted in the understory because they thrive in poor soil. They do not need attention. Shagbark hickories could be planted in the canopy because they have huge deep ...


9

Thymus serpyllum (creeping thyme) is an easy to grow, low height, low maintenance, creeping, perennial that's hardy to USDA zone 4. Pink flowers in early summer might be more interesting / better looking than the Liriope.


9

alchemilla mollis Ladys mantle 8" - 12" works well under trees or in some shade Gallium odoratum Sweet woodruff ~ 6-8" troublefree, hides bulb foliage nicely,slow grower Oenothera speciosa Evening primrose and it's cultivars, good for hotter and dryer as bstpierre mentions thyme is an excellent choice, inexpensive, widely available, tough


9

If you want all of the plants to be the same type, you would probably want a row of shrubs that grow between 3 and 6 feet tall and don't spread much. Blueberries would do well in your location, if you have an acid soil high in humus. Thornless blackberries would produce lots of fruit, but take a lot of care in pruning and supporting. Grapes need more ...


9

I live in USDA zone 6b (Southeastern Pennsylvania), and Pawpaws are native growers here. Cold shouldn't be an issue in 6b, but winter length may have some effect. They don't do well in really long winters. As for the conditions. Soil: What I've noticed is that these don't like compacted soil at all. Lawns are not best. Even a mowed meadow can have ...


9

You are going to have a very difficult time growing much in the forest portion of your land. Yes, currants and gooseberries, black raspberries, and possibly sour cherries will tolerate the shade and fruit, but most things will not. As far as vegetables go, you should be able to grow leafy greens - especially in the spring before the trees have leafed out, ...


9

It's not good for that water to be sitting around your foundation like that. I have a few suggestions that vary in the level of time, money, or practicality. The simplest is going to be to add dirt and grade the area away from the house. That's going to depend on what's around you and where you want the water to go. Hopefully, your house isn't in a hole. I ...


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