Hot answers tagged

12

Rust is iron oxide, which does not harm plants in moderate amounts, because it is not water soluble unless the soil ph is very low. In fact, oxidized iron is what gives most red subsoils their color. Watering your plants with this water will not harm them at all. If you suppose there was nothing environmentally harmful in it before (which is NOT a good ...


11

I've never heard of the need. The issue with hardening is that you're taking a plant in a largely controlled environment with low light levels, and a steady temperature, no wind, to a highly varied environment with strong sunlight, a wider range of temperatures and wind. The stems have to harden, the leaf wax increases, and probably lots of other ...


11

That might well be slug or snail damage - given there's lots of leaf litter laying around your plant, you've created a perfect environment for slugs to hide beneath during the day, and then appear at night and snack on your basil. If you want to confirm that's the problem, go out with a torch at night, especially a damp night, and see what's around. Clear ...


11

I recall doing something like this each spring (for several years) growing up, and the plant of choice was Marigolds (planted in a paper cup, as far as I recall) which were grown in class and then taken home at the end. Tough enough, and if grown in the classroom they can also be an educational experience while not taking up any of your growing space at ...


10

Moss on an indoor pot is a sign that the mix surface is constantly damp, and that isn't good. Use a fork or toothpick or something, and stir up the top layer to get rid of it. Always allow the top 1/2" or so to dry between waterings. Competition shouldn't be a problem except for very small seedlings, and the flavor should be fine.


9

First, there are lots of 'Thymes'. But the most common culinary thyme is Thymus vulgaris. It's a small perennial woody shrub or subshrub (having only some woody stems, near the base), native to the Mediterranean region. Most cultivars are quite hardy and easy to grow. They prefer dry conditions, but will tolerate areas with a bit more moisture if given ...


9

Looks like a heavy whitefly aphid infestation - they're usually underneath the leaves and suck the sap within, causing the leaf to shrivel and die. You can't treat with pesticide because it's an edible plant, so your only recourse is something like neem or insecticidal soap spray, I'm afraid. Further information on how to deal with whitefly on edible plants ...


9

My two suggestions; Scarlet Runner Beans and the second is Carex testacea or Orange Sedge. Easy to grow, very pretty no matter its age, wonderful to tuck into any plant bed or pot, nice just left in the pot and moved around to dress up a corner or a group of pots. My second suggestion would be Scarlet Runner Beans. Tough, hardy, vigorous, fast...very ...


8

I'm not sure how it will taste, but letting it flower is a disaster for other reasons - this plant is a half hardy annual, which means its main purpose is to flower, set seed and die - flowering means it's on the way to setting seed, so clip those off immediately. I can't say I've noticed any deterioration in flavour in the leaves on ordinary Basil when I've ...


8

There absolutely is a tasteless tarragon. It's usually called Russian Tarragon. The plant that you want for cooking is French Tarragon. Russian tarragon grows from seed and reseeds itself easily. French tarragon does not, so you will need to purchase a plant from a nursery or get a cutting or division from a friend. Tarragon is often mislabeled, so I would ...


8

Without looking at your video, I would expect the landscape fabric is being laid as a weed mat to inhibit weeds from regenerating from roots left in situ and coming up in the middle of the raised garden bed. Some people use layers of newspapers, and others old wool carpets.


8

Have you considered something as simple as Garden Cress (Lepidium sativum)? You can simply hand out a pack of seeds and a piece of cotton wool. The kids can then "plant" it themselves (really just sprinkle the seeds on damp cotton wool) and watch it grow. Given how fast it grows - couple of inches a week - and that it is edible, its a pretty good learning ...


7

Does the basil on the left side have any chances of survival? It doesn't seem likely, but there is still some green on the leaves. The plant on the left side is too far gone. It will never fully recover, and should be disposed of. The plant looks like it either took some cold, or got basil fusarium wilt. I think the latter is unlikely, but I'd keep that ...


7

The larger leaves don't necessarily have poor flavor. It's more about age than size. Old leaves don't taste as good as new ones. That's why a good harvesting system is key. Most people try to do this by harvesting the oldest (lowest) leaves as the plant grows, before they get too old. While this can work, it's not the most awesome method for plant form and ...


7

Lighting a plant from beneath will cause the plant to grow towards the light, ergo, downwards, if it grows at all. Phototropism is the name of the process induced by lighting or sunlight from above - the plant wants to maximise the amount of light it receives, and therefore grows up towards the light. If you place the light to one side, the plant will ...


7

Just a quick answer to get started, based on my experience. I never lived in the Puget Sound area, but know it quite well. Will continue to fill in as I have time. Short answer: Get started now, this is the perfect time. On a quick glance I see no plant that you would be too late for, but I haven't sown/planted all of them myself. Calendula will be fine. ...


7

Unlikely to recover - not impossible, but unlikely, and waiting to see if there's any regrowth will take some time. Given you might want some basil between now and Christmas, its probably best to get another plant. And instruct your wife to always leave some leaves on the plant next time... or buy two plants so its easier to leave some leaves in place and ...


7

The term you are looking for is perennial, describing plants that can live for many years. Your rosemary, thyme and peppermint fall in that category. Of these, rosemary is the most frost-sensitive, but hardyness varies somewhat between cultivars. Note that rosemary originally comes from the Mediterranean with it's mild winters. I am a bit pragmatic when ...


7

If anything, I have heard arguments (likely anecdotal) that plants like Tarragon and Basil actually repel some insects, possibly at a range of a few feet. Roses on the other hand, tend to be victimized by a wide range of insects and diseases regardless of what they are planted near. They are not exactly a low maintenance plant. I would suggest searching ...


7

Well, yes and no, or maybe. Annual plants have one purpose - to grow, flower, be pollinated and fertilized, set seed and die, all in a year. Then there's biennials - these form, usually, a basal clump of leaves one year, then flower the following year, set seed and die. Other plants that are considered 'annuals' may actually be perennial, but either look ...


7

Some plants are sensitive to light changes (such as Shark Fin Melon). I think this is partially because Shark Fin Melon is supposed to rely on light changes to know when to set fruit, but even though it may wilt for a while, it recovers. I don't know of any issues with basil. However, if there are issues, I recommend just keeping the plant as strong and ...


7

It's extremely helpful that you included the actual ingredient list in your question, rather than a brandname - thank you! So you know, I grow anything that I eat organically and this question is one of the reasons why I do (the other reason is that I was once a Certified Pesticide Applicator for five years, and the training you receive to get that ...


6

The little starts you buy at the grocery store have recently undergone a huge amount of stress, and wilting after being brought home is relatively common. They are usually grown fast in a greenhouse, sometimes with supplementary CO2 to promote fast growth. They are then packed and shipped (ground or air and ground) for hours, sometimes over a day. This ...


6

Most likely a form of red spider mite, although these prefer hot, dry conditions, and you say you're growing hydroponically; this often means moist air, although not necessarily. Assuming it is spider mite, neem oil in a spray should do the trick, but it would be best to spray only one plant, or a few leaves, to see how the plant responds to the treatment. ...


6

You can certainly try - seed won't cost much. Without more active/brighter/closer/longer lighting, it will probably be rather spindly and weak basil, but providing adequate plant light electrically can run to significant money, at which point buying imported basil might make more sense in wintertime. As a halfway point, you might see if you can (without ...


6

Mint does this when constrained within a pot - its natural growth habit is to throw out long runners up to 18 inches under the ground and pop up a good distance away from the original clump, which is why its so often said its not a good idea to plant it in open ground. Turn it out of its pot, cut the root ball into 3 sections, replant one in the same pot. ...


6

You can't actually "split" a basil plant as they grow from one stem. What you probably had is a pot of seedlings / small plants like they are sold in grocery stores or garden centers for cooking. Please see this post for more details. As for the collapsing, I see a few potential causes, but without pictures it is almost impossible to say for sure what ...


6

"Worth it" is often personal taste. Of these plants (in those store-bought pots are many young plants, not one), the smaller ones with the large leaves on top will probably bounce back and grow a bit more. The large ones with blooms possibly not really - those will focus on producing seeds, then die. I have in the past seen those pots as "disposable". For ...


6

Yes, they are the same species. Moench put it as different genus (Majorana), but still keeping references to Linnaeus' Origanum majorana. So they are the same species, and both are acceptable (and valid) names, but the currently accepted name is Origanum majorana. I use the Plant List: http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/kew-143853 This database is ...


5

Looks like a little wind. It won't affect the quality for culinary use, but possibly aesthetically as a garnish. Looks like Italian parsley, so not generally used as a garnish anyway. The plant looks quite healthy otherwise, so I wouldn't worry about it, but for next time, keep in mind that leaf tips on the outermost leaves are the most liable to sustain ...


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