Hot answers tagged

24

There are two reasons I can think of: Your plant has bolted If your mint plant has been producing flowers (usually a cone shaped inflorescence), then it has started bolting. While mints are perennials and I haven't known them to die off quickly after bolting, it sure is a process that makes the plant focus its resources elsewhere (flowers). You should ...


16

Herbs (and leaf vegetables in general) must be harvested regularly and not left to mature too much or too soon. Here are a few tips to harvesting herbs — mostly paraphrased from these two answers of mine — that'll help you keep a good availability of herbs for most of the year. Harvest the young leaves There's a reason why grocery stores only sell the ...


15

Oh yes, they will. I always do this and one or two bunches from the store is enough to produce green onions for an average household for a few months. While the scallions are refrigerated in the store, I try to chop off the bulbs as soon as I get home and plant them. However, a day or two's delay shouldn't matter. Onions are generally very easy to grow (...


13

Some things I've noticed about basil: 1) Basil is deep-rooted. I have medium size basil plants in fairly large pots (pots which originally contained 5ft pears trees). The basil roots have grown out of the drain holes and anchored the pots to the ground. Basil roots can easily exceed 1ft of depth. 2) Basil can root from the stem like tomatoes. I ...


12

IMHO that answer should work fine in your situation. It's a pretty "standard" procedure for dealing with such pests on potted plants. Submerging the pot in water for an hour or two, then allowing it to dry out will not have any adverse effects on your Basil plant (or any other "common" potted plant I can think of). It's not like you're keeping the roots ...


12

Not an herb, but lettuce intercrops well with tomato. I have parsley growing amongst my tomatoes right now -- it doesn't seem to harm the tomato any and the parsley is doing well. According to wikipedia*, and considering the time of year and how much growing you might have left, onion is supposed to help tomato. From the same list, don't plant dill as it ...


12

Here are some things I have had experience with in this situation. They all will grow with proper care. thyme leaf lettuce radishes spinach pepper determinate tomatoes baby style carrots tophat blueberries poly variegated cat grass sage oregano strawberries catmint potatoes sweet potatoes


11

I've never heard of the need. The issue with hardening is that you're taking a plant in a largely controlled environment with low light levels, and a steady temperature, no wind, to a highly varied environment with strong sunlight, a wider range of temperatures and wind. The stems have to harden, the leaf wax increases, and probably lots of other ...


11

That might well be slug or snail damage - given there's lots of leaf litter laying around your plant, you've created a perfect environment for slugs to hide beneath during the day, and then appear at night and snack on your basil. If you want to confirm that's the problem, go out with a torch at night, especially a damp night, and see what's around. Clear ...


11

I recall doing something like this each spring (for several years) growing up, and the plant of choice was Marigolds (planted in a paper cup, as far as I recall) which were grown in class and then taken home at the end. Tough enough, and if grown in the classroom they can also be an educational experience while not taking up any of your growing space at ...


10

Chives, Oregano, Cilantro, Mint, Basil, and Parsley all grow well as a companion to tomatoes. Some such as the Basil and Chives are said to enhance the flavor of the actual fruits as well but most all of these help deter harmful pests (such as aphids, certain beetles, etc.) while also helping attract beneficial bugs. Oregano in particular when it spreads ...


10

First off, your basil has bolted, which means that it has sent out a long stalk with flowers on it and the plant is on its way to dying. This is part of the plant's life cycle and there's nothing you can really do about it. In future, remember that you can prolong a basil's life by pinching the flowers as soon as they appear. As to why this works, I gave an ...


10

Rust is iron oxide, which does not harm plants in moderate amounts, because it is not water soluble unless the soil ph is very low. In fact, oxidized iron is what gives most red subsoils their color. Watering your plants with this water will not harm them at all. If you suppose there was nothing environmentally harmful in it before (which is NOT a good ...


10

Moss on an indoor pot is a sign that the mix surface is constantly damp, and that isn't good. Use a fork or toothpick or something, and stir up the top layer to get rid of it. Always allow the top 1/2" or so to dry between waterings. Competition shouldn't be a problem except for very small seedlings, and the flavor should be fine.


9

Your cilantro has definitely bolted. You can now do one of two things. You can either scrap the pot and start with new seeds or wait for the flower to mature and collect the seeds and use them a coriander (a different spice), or to plant more cilantro. Your parsley looks pretty good except for a little bit of yellowing. I would pull off the yellow leaves ...


9

One cannot give an exact time frame for a plant's survival. If you live in a cold place, the plant will die when temperatures start dropping, otherwise, it can live year round. The most important thing is to not let it bolt. A bolted plant looks like in this question. You can read through the advice given in Best conditions for basil and try to follow that ...


9

Chives are one of the easiest herbs to grow and are trouble free unless you grow onions close by. The onion fly will attack most members of the onion family of which the chive is a member. What are ideal conditions for germination? Soil less mix, moisture, light, bottom heat, moderate to high humidity to start germination with more air movement after ...


9

It does look like a tomato. The easy way to tell for sure is to gently rub the leaves -- even at that size, tomato should have a distinctive aroma. If you used compost in your potting soil, you could just have gotten a volunteer from a stray seed. As mentioned in the comments, the seedling to the right of the tomato could be a chive. They grow fairly slowly,...


9

Water the pots thoroughly with distilled water. Most distillation processes remove the dissolved elements in water. As this water flows through the soil that is saturated with fertilizer ions it will attract and remove them. Of course you are still left with a stressed plant with leaf burn. Success is not guaranteed....


9

First, there are lots of 'Thymes'. But the most common culinary thyme is Thymus vulgaris. It's a small perennial woody shrub or subshrub (having only some woody stems, near the base), native to the Mediterranean region. Most cultivars are quite hardy and easy to grow. They prefer dry conditions, but will tolerate areas with a bit more moisture if given ...


9

My two suggestions; Scarlet Runner Beans and the second is Carex testacea or Orange Sedge. Easy to grow, very pretty no matter its age, wonderful to tuck into any plant bed or pot, nice just left in the pot and moved around to dress up a corner or a group of pots. My second suggestion would be Scarlet Runner Beans. Tough, hardy, vigorous, fast...very ...


8

As I mention in my answer on a question on easy to grow herbs and spices, you must harvest your herbs regularly. Herbs are not exactly like tomatoes/peppers where you plant it, wait for it to grow, for fruits to be produced, ripen and harvest a big crop all at once. Once you have a bunch of young leaves (or when the plant is 6" high), you can start ...


8

Yes, I have had quite a bit of success using 25 litre buckets on my balcony, planting some plants "upside down" and others at the top of the bucket. I cut a small hole in the bottom of the bucket and gently push the roots of my seedling through the hole. I keep the roots in place with a small square of landscaping fabric with a slit cut into one side, or ...


8

Stevia seems to be widely available in North America. Examples include Vesey's or Richters The issue seems to be that plants grown from seed can have widely varying amounts of the sugar substitute. Seeds can normally be shipped across the world but live plants are subject to phytosanitary certificates which are a lot of work for an individual. Your best ...


8

Yes, your arugula's crop season is coming to an end, as bstpierre notes. Mine finished going to seed and dried out completely by last week (I live in southern California, so you can compare the weather here with your location). You certainly have planted them very close to each other, which is why they aren't tall/the leaves aren't bigger (in comparison, ...


8

UPDATE @GardenerJ points out that the list below is far too liberal - blueberries like very acid soil (4.5-5.5), whereas the list includes plants that will tolerate, at best, a little below 7. Of course, what matters is how acid your soil is - not what blueberries like. A list of herb pH preferences can be found at the Gardener's Network - check your ...


8

I would take basil by pinching whole stems off. The new growth is the best tasting and the plant will sprout multiple new stems from the old one. You have to be careful not to overdo it which is why you might want more than one plant to produce enough basil on a regular basis. Most herbs will respond to this treatment, I can't think of any exceptions, but I ...


8

I'm not sure how it will taste, but letting it flower is a disaster for other reasons - this plant is a half hardy annual, which means its main purpose is to flower, set seed and die - flowering means it's on the way to setting seed, so clip those off immediately. I can't say I've noticed any deterioration in flavour in the leaves on ordinary Basil when I've ...


8

There absolutely is a tasteless tarragon. It's usually called Russian Tarragon. The plant that you want for cooking is French Tarragon. Russian tarragon grows from seed and reseeds itself easily. French tarragon does not, so you will need to purchase a plant from a nursery or get a cutting or division from a friend. Tarragon is often mislabeled, so I would ...


8

Looks like a heavy whitefly aphid infestation - they're usually underneath the leaves and suck the sap within, causing the leaf to shrivel and die. You can't treat with pesticide because it's an edible plant, so your only recourse is something like neem or insecticidal soap spray, I'm afraid. Further information on how to deal with whitefly on edible plants ...


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