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11

All of the currant family (red, black, gooseberry, lingonberry...) do reasonably well in shade. High and low bush cranberry do well in shade. If you have light shade, look at nut trees. It will be a good while before they produce, but it's worth a look. Hickory, hazelnut, walnut, beechnut are possibilities. I recall that one of persimmon and pawpaw do ok ...


9

You are going to have a very difficult time growing much in the forest portion of your land. Yes, currants and gooseberries, black raspberries, and possibly sour cherries will tolerate the shade and fruit, but most things will not. As far as vegetables go, you should be able to grow leafy greens - especially in the spring before the trees have leafed out, ...


8

Your plant appears to be an Areca palm which is now known as Dypsis lutescens. This looks like a combination of factors: overwatering promotes anerobic conditions in the soil which promote fungus. The black spots and brown spots are indicators of this. Another identification is the classic signs of fungus growth which is a spot with a ring on the inside ...


7

It's not so much the variety of tree which counts for making a small treehouse, it's more its maturity, size, climbability, and particular forking of branches that make it a suitable subject for one. Most amateur treehouses are erected in trees that provide those conditions, and they will usually be 70-90 years old or more, with a trunk girth of more than 6 ...


6

Creeping thyme - hardy to at least USDA zone 4, thins a bit in light shade, tolerates heat very well, flowers in summer and attractive to bees, maintenance limited to ripping it out when it gets too big. Never had a problem with bees but it will self seed. Not suitable for culinary use. Irish moss - hardy to at least USDA zone 4, tolerates shade, small white ...


6

Top of mind i would have suggested Mango, Avocado and Litchis which all provide delicious fruit and fantastic shade. I also thought of Macadamia, but turns out the growth rate is slow. In the end, after some research, here are some interesting indigenous alternatives: Syzygium cumini / Jambolan / Jamun / Java plum: Evergreen dense foliage, grown for ...


6

No undergrowth forest plus creek makes me immediately think of allium ursinum (European variety) or allium tricoccum (US native). Both are happy to cover the forest floor in spring and disappear later in the year. If you are lucky, they take hold and propagate themselves. Not exactly a mass food source, but a spring kitchen staple for me. Used fresh in ...


6

Should be fine - needs warmth and good daylight, but not having any sun as a houseplant is fine, even outdoors it prefers dappled sunlight or partial shade, see here https://www.gardenseeker.com/indoor-plants/callisia_repens.htm


5

You can grown indian almond You can also grow Neem tree which gives a lot of cool shade and small fruit which is eaten by some birds. Both the trees mentioned above are native to India. They shed the leaves in autumn. But all through out the year they give lot of shade. Indian Almond will give its fruit in Winters. Mango is also extremely shady tree ...


5

Apricot trees are great for shade. Our Mormon apricot provides the most (as in darkest) shade out of all our fruit trees. It's a fairly young tree, too (about 6-12 years since it was planted in our yard from the nursery). It's a good spot to harden off plants. We have, and have had peach, nectarine, apples (McIntosh, Yellow Delicious and others), cherry, ...


5

It's a bit of a tall order, wanting plants that perform best in spring, summer and winter and not autumn, but I've had a go! Check out Ruscus aculeatus, the variety 'Sparkler' if you can get it, because that one's hermaphrodite and will produce red berries which last well into Winter. Otherwise, you'd need a mix of male and female to get berries. It's ...


5

Nuts of course, and some floor plants, will be naturals, but so as not to repeat others' answers, I thought I'd point out the issues/other things I noticed about your idea, rather than listing plants. No undergrowth means there isn't enough sun for the undergrowth. The lower tiers, and the floor, all depend on the amount of light let through the top canopy. ...


5

No, doesn't need to be in shade - lilac does prefer full sun, but that doesn't mean it won't cope with any shade. It may be getting more sun than you're aware of, but whether you can move it successfully or not is dependent on how long its been there - if you don't know that, then it depends how big it is, and whether its a dwarf variety. If it's been in ...


5

Carex pensylvanica seed is available in quantity at Prairie Moon Nursery. The species is difficult to germinate, the cost is considerable at $300 per ounce of approximately 30k seeds, and the plant is not as shade-tolerant as commonly believed, thinning out after a few years of less-than-substantial sunlight. Possible substitutions of shade-tolerant, North-...


5

almost no mow shade grass This fine fescue is gorgeous as an understory ground cover. Make sure you mow it twice a year because when it starts falling over it will be so thick as to block any sun and/or trap moisture and you'll get rot and grass kill. When it starts the fall over and sweeps you have about a month before you have to mow it. The height to ...


5

In my opinion, it is not a big deal. Six hours are enough. You can cut some branches of the other tree, and wait the spruce to grow, so it will get more sun. In nature, young tree tend to grow in semi-shadows (most will die or be dormant also for decades in shadows, waiting a old tree to fall). I just expect that it will grow very slow, but (also in my ...


5

If you check the area where you want to plant, you will be able to see what plants are already growing in these conditions, and that will inform you as to what sort of plants you might be able to grow. But generally, in low light conditions, you need to plant things for their edible leaves, and roots. And you'll need access to water.


4

Conditions. Shading the second floor requires taller trees (dooohhh, I know) NMOsZ "vicious sun" 2-5pm photo indicates that BVFcU photo is nearer to midday. BVFcU shows downspout (gutter drop, leaders, whatever) extenders. The driveway itself looks well-graded. The grade near the house looks too flat, IMO. OTOH, your soil looks like coarser loam or "dirty"...


4

White clover is a good green manure for shade and will grow in low nitrogen, compacted soil. Generally, compacted soil is lacking in calcium and will need lime or gypsum.


4

For a completely different approach have you considered planting a hop (humulus lupulus) a half-hardy perennial, grows VERY rapidly to about 8metres and then dies away to nothing in fall, and then comes away again in the spring - you do have to clean up the mess, but it composts easily - you would need a frame for it to climb on but this is not difficult.


4

You could train some grapevines to grow on those. I'm not sure if there's enough sun. If you count rose hips as fruit, you could grow climbing rose bushes. There are lots of annual fruiting plants that climb, but they don't necessarily need to do so. For instance, a lot of cucurbits climb. Shark Fin Melon might be okay. It grows leaves pretty well on low ...


4

I'm not sure what your zone is, but I have a zone 4 garden around a spruce tree, as well, and the plants that have done well there are: Blueberries, Vaccinium sp. Columbine, Aquilegia sp. (which supposedly likes alkaline soil, but is thriving next to my spruce and blueberries) Kinnikinnick, Arctostaphylos sp. Bleeding heart, Dicentra or Lamprocapnos sp. ...


4

All the ones recommended already, plus Campanula portenschlagiana (previously Campanula muralis, sometimes still sold under that name). Note, NOT Campanula carpatica or any of the hundreds of other varieties you're likely to find available. C. portenschlagiana is a very neat grower, remains evergreen, tolerates some shade - the fact it'll be in full light ...


4

The two genus generally classed as heaths, lings or heathers are Calluna or Erica. Calluna won't tolerate lime in the soil, but there are some varieties of Erica that will, though generally, the larger proportion do not like it. What all these plants have in common, though, is a liking for an open and sunny position - given your bed faces east, although it ...


4

There are a number of issues with trying to grow a shade tree in a container. To get a good amount of shade you'll need a large container. Large container, lots of soil and water means lots of weight so you need to make sure your roof can support it. Most trees grown in containers are dwarf varieties that won't get too big and they tend to grow slowly. To ...


4

Blue spruces only need full sun to reach their top growth potential, they do not require it to be healthy. They will grow very well in shade, if they are not under another tree's dripline, and if there aren't many other tree roots in the soil. Under a dripline, and in dense rooted ground, a spruce will grow much slower (sometimes less than 6" a year), and ...


4

Partial shade isn't a problem, though if its more than partial you may find flowering is reduced. However, you may want to reconsider your choice - Escallonia Leaf Spot is a fungal infection of these plants and there is no effective treatment for it. The disease is widespread in the West country because of higher precipitation levels, such that many people ...


4

Your greenhouse should be oriented east west. Your plant beds (and I recommend building your greenhouse over soil that you will simply add decomposed organic matter to as you build your beds and periodically cover the tops around the plants with decomposed organic mulch as well) should be north south (long axis). Do not worry about morning sun or afternoon ...


4

What you are probably thinking about it called hydroseeding. It's typically a blend of grass seed, some kind of wood fiber/cellulose and fertilizer. It is typically used in large scale seeding jobs because of the ease of application and the moisture retention of the media. You can buy spray bottles of it at many hardware stores. It will be liquid and ...


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