33

Watermelons and pumpkins naturally grow as trailing vines across the ground. A tomato plant grows upright, holding its fruit up off the ground. They often need cages or stakes because the tomatoes get heavy enough to pull limbs or even the entire plant to the ground, potentially snapping the branches or stem in the process. 'Wild tomatoes' bear much ...


22

Here are a few things you can do to promote fruiting in your tomato plant. 1. Remove the suckers Suckers are the small offshoots that rise from between the central stem and a leaf node (see image). Suckers need to be removed periodically (aas soon as you see them), as they only suck essential nutrients from the plant, which could otherwise have been used ...


22

The size of the tomato has been increased with human selection. Wild tomatoes are berry sized, so the plant doesn't need extra support. The same is true for most plants that humans have selectively bred, although for tomatoes, the plant is not fibrous or tough enough to bear much weight. Genetic engineering has come a long way, but it will be a while before ...


18

I've done tomatoes in a few different ways. The list of steps below seems long and involved, but it's really pretty easy. Start 6-8 weeks before the last frost date for your area, or 6-8 weeks before you plan to transplant to the garden. That's about 1 week to germinate, 1 week for growing before potting up, 3-5 weeks of growing in the second container, and ...


18

Let me preface this answer by saying that due to my experience in 2016 contrasted with my 2015 experience, I personally think soil conditions and composition, kinds of light and light levels, and how you water your tomatoes may have a profound affect on heat-tolerance. Since the temperature in your area fluctuates so much between day and night, the rules ...


17

Yes, you should thin them. If you wanted to keep them, you could try pricking out -- gently tease apart the roots from the soil and move the plant into a separate container. Always handle the plant by the leaves, not the stem. (The plant can replace a broken leaf, but a broken stem is fatal.) In your case, since you've got more plants than you need, thin ...


17

Another reason to cage them is if you leave them on the ground, they are more prone to fungal diseases, and you really don't want those in your garden because they are hard to get rid of. I speak from experience. 4 years later and I'm still trying to eradicate the blight spores that came when one of my trellis' fell over from a wind storm and I thought it ...


16

This is a situation where a net might be the best option. Put it on stakes to hold it over the plants, and arrange it so it can be easily lifted or pulled aside for harvesting. make sure the net touches the ground so squirrels can't get underneath. This spring I made little teepees of chicken wire to keep them off my yucca seedlings. You will want something ...


16

Tomato plants need some kind of support (as you see, they are a sort of vine). Especially when they are fruiting, the stem cannot support the weight of the tomatoes. It is normal to have the stem curved (and down to the soil). In professional greenhouses, the tomatoes are supported by a cord, and the cord will be lowered (or elongated) in order to have the ...


15

In addition to the good points made by the other answers, at least in my experience, it's also important to keep the leaves and branches off of the ground, not just the fruit. Branches and leaves dragging the ground (or even hanging low enough to the ground to be splashed by soil during rain) can get Septoria Leaf Spot, which will quickly kill off the ...


14

These are the tiny hairs on the stems trying to turn into roots, above ground; they are called stem primordia, and this is usually caused by high humidity, over-watering or prolonged rain - see here. Generally speaking, this is nothing to worry about, and is best ignored; however, it can be triggered by root problems or disease, and given that some of your ...


14

I sprinkle cayenne pepper on the fruits and around the base of the plant, and this seems to keep the squirrels away. Cayenne is also available as a "hot pepper wax spray" which may also work.


13

Looking at the video, it looks like a pretty typical whitefly. They aren't uncommon on tomatoes (or in your garden in general), and they typically do the most damage by transmitting disease. UC Davis has a good summary page: http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/r783301211.html From my own personal experience, there are three things that can help. The first is ...


13

Cracking tomatoes happens when the (almost) ripe fruit expands and the skin can't hold up any more. (A bit like stretch marks...) There are a few causes that typically lead to different crack patterns, but sometimes it's a bit non-conclusive, so I won't go into detail. Excess water, especially after a drought - water as consistantly as possible, protect ...


13

That injury looks more like a "sprain" than a break. In other words, the stem is injured, but the tissue isn't completely severed. If you can immobilize it and provide additional support to keep the weight of the ripening fruit from damaging it further, I bet it will recover. (Patient needs to avoid strenuous activity though.)


12

I think I would go with winwaed's answer, but if you find out the culprit is a slightly bigger creature, I might then be tempted to look into getting a "Scarecrow Motion-Activated Sprinkler" system (like this one) to humanely scare away the hungry creatures...


12

Not an herb, but lettuce intercrops well with tomato. I have parsley growing amongst my tomatoes right now -- it doesn't seem to harm the tomato any and the parsley is doing well. According to wikipedia*, and considering the time of year and how much growing you might have left, onion is supposed to help tomato. From the same list, don't plant dill as it ...


12

From the look of the pictures I think that the plants will be ready on time for the dinner. In the meantime I would recommend the following care for them. I water once a day at least. Never let them stress for water. Nine out of ten days they are watered with a half solution of Peters or some other water soluble fertilizer rated for tomatoes and vegetable ...


11

Looking closely at the last picture, there are clear dark concentric circles around the black spots which is textbook early blight. It is a trademark of the disease. Blight has been bad, really bad this year. Your best chance is unfortunately to pull the plants and save any remaining healthy plants. Then going forward there are some key cultural ...


11

Tomato seeds that have never been dried can germinate. I've tried it. Tomatoes can actually germinate inside the fruit, sometimes (wherein the fruit is still good to eat, at that). I've read that the gel sacks around the seeds are supposed to inhibit germination. You may have greater success if you remove the sacks. I could be wrong, but I don't think ...


11

Sweet Million are an F1 variety, so will not come true. Seeds saved from their first year may grow what are known as F2 types, which may be quite close to the original F1 Sweet Million, but any seed saved from the second year will produce random tomatoes. More info here http://www.gardenfocused.co.uk/vegetable/tomato-outdoor/variety-sweet-million.php


11

I recall doing something like this each spring (for several years) growing up, and the plant of choice was Marigolds (planted in a paper cup, as far as I recall) which were grown in class and then taken home at the end. Tough enough, and if grown in the classroom they can also be an educational experience while not taking up any of your growing space at ...


10

Chives, Oregano, Cilantro, Mint, Basil, and Parsley all grow well as a companion to tomatoes. Some such as the Basil and Chives are said to enhance the flavor of the actual fruits as well but most all of these help deter harmful pests (such as aphids, certain beetles, etc.) while also helping attract beneficial bugs. Oregano in particular when it spreads ...


10

You've got to pay attention to any insects in the area and how moist the soil is to work out which of two possible reasons for the purple rain. Phosphorus deficiency You've got this if the leaf veins are purple and overall sport a purplish tint. "Recognizing Tomato Problems - Colorado State University". Most likely if there are no insects around, it's ...


10

As a general rule, you can prune tomatoes every 7-10 days. Yes, it is possible to over prune the plant. If you remove too many stems, you will reduce production. And you don't need to prune a determinate tomato -- they will stop growing at a certain height. I wouldn't prune yours. At 6 months old, I'd expect it to be much larger than 18". Is it fruiting? (...


10

What to prune is a lot more important than how often. If you know what to prune, you can't prune too frequently. Then you're better off pruning when sucker growth (and whatever else you want to prune) is small, so you reduce the amount of wasted growth. So it really depends on how fast the plants are growing. In July, if the weather is good, and they'...


10

You should definitely thin them out. No more than two per spot. If you have two, you will have to make sure they get enough nutrients and water. I snip the stem of the thinnest stalked seedlings with a pair of scissors. If they are the same height I pick the one with more leaves. It does look like your seedlings could use a little more light, but they will ...


10

I would say pull the whole plants if they will not survive the winter, just in case they became infected with something like Verticillium Wilt in their weakened state prior to dying, which might then build up and overwinter in the soil and infect your new plants next spring. Plus think about gophers or insects that might feed on the roots, you're providing ...


10

Too much water, most likely, for one thing, could be combined with poor drainage depending on the details of the pot and soil mix. Probably some other things [planting depth?] to not get any tomato seedlings (I gather that you "planted tomatoes" [fruit] rather than transplanting tomato plants) such as excessively cool temperatures or not noticing the ...


10

Blossom end rot is a physiological disorder primarily caused by irregular or insufficient water supply, which disables calcium uptake. The fruits, or the bits that aren't affected, are not dangerous to eat, so if the part that's left after you cut off the brown bits is tasty, then yes, you can eat them. You might want to reconsider if the brown parts are ...


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