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20

Benjamin, here are my recommendations based on your answers to my questions in the above comments: Get yourself some suitably sized clay pots, they should be big enough so the plants have room to grow in, have good drainage holes in the bottom (remember you can always easily drill your own or add more, if need be) & transfer the plants into them. Pots ...


17

These look like the tree lichens that are growing on my own trees. A lichen is a composite organism where by a fungus lives together with an algae in a symbiotic relationship. They don't hurt the tree, and are more commonly seen on the bark of older trees where the bark is not constantly being shed and regrown. So, it may also be an indicator of poor health ...


16

Those look like Birch Polypore, scientific name Piptoporus betulinus. This mushroom is global but found almost exclusively on birch trees. The polypore is called "saprobic," which means it feeds on parts of the tree which are already dead or decaying, so most likely that crack was there first. Now that the tree is infested, though, unfortunately it's likely ...


14

That is lichen, which is not detrimental to your tree's health (it's not a parasite, it lives off of photosynthesis). This is normal, no need to worry.


12

Given that your avocado was doing well before you moved it into a warm, centrally-heated environment, the problem is likely to be caused by: a constantly dry atmosphere The best way to give it more humidity, is to stand it on a 'pebble tray' - fill a shallow plastic tray (one which is two or three times as wide as the base of your pot) with pebbles or ...


9

As Graham says they are lichen and moss. A tree will commonly live in a symbiotic relationship with millions of macro and micro-scopic organisms. In tropical and temperate rain forests overgrowth on the the bark is very common. I cannot find any research which indicates that they harm the tree in any way at any age as these publications indicate. That ...


8

The bark mulch leads me to think it's a slime mold - which is either a fungus or Something Else, depending on who you listen to. See, for instance, this article from the Colorado Extension Service. Beyond ugliness, it's harmless.


7

This is a member of the Nidulariaceae / birds nest fungi, the exact variety would need better photos and possibly a microscope, but I can still answer your other questions: No, they are not dangerous. Inedible, but they don't damage your garden. They do what they do best, which is eating the decomposing wood from your mulch. The white "felted" disc ...


7

I don't know which fungus it is, but there are bracket fungii which exude amber coloured droplets (Shaggy Bracket, Oak Bracket fungus) although this one doesn't look like either of those. Trees, when they're infected, can also produce amber coloured droplets - sometimes they stink because its a bacterial infection, sometimes there's no smell at all, so it ...


7

Powdery mildew occurs only when it is relatively cool, still, and quite humid (maybe I should say foggy). Usually the mildew will vanish when these conditions pass. You can spray with a solution of 2 tablespoons 3% hydrogen peroxide per quart of water. It should take care of it. Repeat as needed. Note that peroxide has no prophylactic effects - it only acts ...


7

There appears to be a long standing insect infestation, possiby whitefly (does anything rise up and fly about when you go near or disturb the plant?) or scale infestation of some sort. The leaves look somewhat sticky, they're unhealthy with evidence of damage on the stems as well - there are white dots on the upper surface of the leaves and I think there ...


7

It is a little hard to tell for sure from the single photo (if you could pick a specimen & post more detailed photos including the underside & provide a description of the texture, it would help), but it looks to be what is commonly called a Wood Ear Fungus. There are a couple species I am aware of that are commonly referred to as Wood Ear, & I'...


7

How impressive! I think you can relax - this is not a sign of a massive insect infestation and not a fungus, but one of nature’s wonders known as slime mold. The “eggs” are the spore-carrying fruiting bodies. They come in lots of different shapes and colors, some with a striking resemblance to insect eggs. This one looks a bit like yours, for example. If ...


6

There is another non chemical treatment which should work, particularly for powdery mildew - 1 part milk to 9 parts water mixed in a sprayer, spray all leaves and stems, including under the leaves. Doesn't matter whether the milk is full fat or skimmed. The 'scientific' explanation as to why it works is there's something about the lactic acid which seems to ...


6

Blackspot is a difficult disease to control, as I know from bitter experience. I see that you are in Australia, where it will soon be spring, so here is what I suggest: Remove all dead leaves from around your rose bushes, as the disease spores overwinter on them and, in spring, as soon as it rains, are splashed or blown up up onto the new foliage. Dispose ...


6

It's a slime mold, a weird primitive organism that has spores but isn't fungus. See also (as usual) Wikipedia. It's not harmful. In a very few places, one phase of this, when it's transparent "slime", is eaten. No thanks. It made (non)fungus of the month in 1999 - what an honor! As for getting rid of it - there's no need, but if you want to try, use ...


6

Like your coriander, you may be overwatering your mint as well. Although mint likes moist soil, the key here is "moist" and not "wet." Unless you are experiencing very high temps and very low humidity there, then every day is probably too often to be watering your plants.


6

Removing the fruiting bodies will not slow the damage/decay to the host tree. They do not affect the rate of the mycelium growth within the tree, and, if anything, removing the fruiting bodies will divert energy to new mycelium growth. They are only present for one purpose: spreading the fungus around. Usually, in a case that bad, you will remove the tree. ...


6

I would also suggest that you only water the plants in the morning when the excess water will evaporate in the sunlight. I made this mistake several times with midnight watering which caused my salvia, Rosemary and lemon verbena to drown first then get fungal disease.


6

Your problem is thinking this is a plant. This is obviously a mushroom. If you look for "black mushroom growing in bathroom" you'll find relevant results. One of the genera is called coprinus but I'm not enough of a mycologist to tell if you have that or something else.


6

I've got to say that looks an awful lot like a brain coral with moss growing on it. I know of no mushrooms that look nearly as similar to brain coral, and I don't think any fungal fruiting body would last long enough on the ground to grow moss like that. I think someone went to Florida or the Bahamas many years ago, and brought back a souvenir. We've got ...


6

That appears to be Southern Blight, Sclerotium rolfsii It's a fungal disease from the soil, and affects many species of plants. You cannot cure plants infected with it. From the University of California: Rotate to nonhost crops, such as corn, sorghum, rice, or small grains, for at least 2 years to reduce inoculum. Deep plowing to bury plant refuse ...


6

Looks like some kind of Verbena in the top pic, possibly Verbena bonariensis - these are prone to getting powdery mildew, particularly towards the end of the growing season, and the usual cause is dryness at the roots, and yes, powdery mildew can spread to other susceptible plants. If the soil is dry, its worth watering, but otherwise, yes, the milk remedy ...


6

re: "How can one prevent baby/recently sprouted plant disease?" With knowledge & proper care. re: "When one desires to germinate seeds in the seedling tray, he/she has to keep a humid and warm environment." Depending on the type/s of seeds that you are trying to germinate, you may not need a warm & humid environment. Most garden seeds germinate ...


6

It's a member of the order Agaricales. Which contains many edible mushrooms such as the white mushrooms you buy in the store as well as very poisonous mushrooms such as the European destroying angel. Agaricales apart from chanterelles are often hard to identify and easy to confuse. Touching a poisonous mushroom is not dangerous. However when dealing with ...


6

Your close up leaf images show an aphid infestation. In my experience, this is a highly persistent insect that infests chili plants amongst others with over 500 different types of Aphids specific to particular plants. My own chilli plant is over one year old and got infested while outside, and again when wintered inside. I've been spraying regularly with ...


6

These are Parasola plicatilis, the pleated inkcap. They are saprobic, meaning they live off decaying matter in the soil, and these fruiting bodies are usually short lived. Common in grass, but whether they're moving towards your house or not, they're nothing to worry about, they're not going to damage your house. Fungal mycelium are everywhere in the soil, ...


5

Depends - is there anything resembling this on other parts of the tree, perhaps on the leafed branches? This could be woolly aphid, it could be scale eggs (some scale insects lay their eggs under white cottony threads like this), but if it was either of those, I'd expect to see further evidence on the rest of the tree. Otherwise, it could be some kind of ...


5

That is leafminer damage. You can control leafminers by cutting off affected leaves, to improve appearance, and remove existing leafminers before they mature (for minor infestations) Spraying with neem oil for the adult insects early in the season before they lay their eggs (this is what I usually do), or using a stronger insecticide to knock out existing ...


5

You don't normally see fungus growing on clay pots unless it is in a greenhouse with a high humidity. Then you see algae and green slimy growths. However you can see a white powdery exudate on clay pots where the local water has a lot of dissolved salts. If your area has a lot of limestone this will likely be calcium and a mix of other salts. If this is ...


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