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21

Quite normal. Some varieties store well, some don't. As a rule, the better storing apples are harder than the not so good for storing apples as they come off the tree. If you know the variety (beyond it being a cooker) you might even find that noted as part of its description - in any case, you now know it for yourself. An alternate storage method might ...


20

Yes, how well an apple stores is definitely dependent on the variety. Many nurseries even market some of their trees as "good keepers". And some apples, like Spitzenburg, improve in flavor after they are stored for a few weeks. Others, like Empire, have the best flavor when you eat them straight from the tree. As a general rule, most apples that ripen early ...


14

That is lichen, which is not detrimental to your tree's health (it's not a parasite, it lives off of photosynthesis). This is normal, no need to worry.


11

A picture would be nice. If the trees are young, they may not yet have an extensive enough root system and canopy to support all the fruit so you end up with lots of small fruit rather then larger specimens. And do you want growth wasted when they drop prematurely as the tree sheds those it can't support? Another reason is that low lying branches laden with ...


10

Apple trees do well in clay. There are a few things you could do different next time: do not put stones or other soil amendments in the bottom of the hole. If the planting hole has reached the clay sub soil or pan then plant it high or "proud" as described here. The addition of organic matter provides little or no advantage to the planting hole in ...


10

My experience is different. It is very easy to have a apple tree from seed. But apple trees are not auto-fertile. This mean that to have apple on a tree, you need pollen from an other trees (and other varieties). There are tables about which varieties could pollinate which other variety, so different variety is not always enough. To complicate things, you ...


9

This site from Washington State University offers a wealth of information about apples and their uses. You'll find a long list of apple varieties, including type descriptions and whether they're best used for long storage; eating; cooking, as in pies and applesauce; and cider. I don't know where you live, and some of these are regionalized to western United ...


9

You have this kind of wounds of your apple tree because it was not pruned correctly. It cannot heal at the tip of the cut, so you must cut close to where the other buds or living branches are. Opposite to other trees, you must cut very close to the buds. Here is how to prune: very close to the parts that will go on handling life in them. What not to do:


8

Many apples fruit from multi-year-old "spurs" - specialized branches that mostly grow the clusters of flower buds. It sounds to me like you may have accidentally pruned a lot of your fruiting spurs off with the water sprouts and other extra branches.


8

I volunteered at a heritage garden (shameless plug for a place worth visiting) that had old crab apple and their bark did exfoliate or peel in little scales about two inches high by an inch wide. This is normal for mature crab apple and apple trees. What is in your pictures doesn't look like a mature tree with a trunk over eight inches in diameter and ...


8

Probably Apple Scab, which is an issue where you are, as it is in many parts of the world. It's caused by a fungus, and it affects the twigs behind the fruits and often the leaves too. Some info in the link below, but it looks as if you'll need to spray with a copper solution to get some kind of control. How easy that will be in a large tree, I leave you to ...


8

What "full size" IS depends on what you do or don't do (and/or what "June-drop" does or not do for you.) More smaller fruit - don't thin. Less larger fruit - do thin. From the tree's point of view the smallest, seediest fruit that will still be considered edible by some animal who will transport the seeds elsewhere is "big enough." If you thin the fruit, ...


8

As well as the issue of small-sized fruit, another consequence of letting a tree over-crop by not thinning is that the tree may start a cycle of only producing a good crop once every two years. This problem affects apples and pears more than other tree fruits. Some varieties are more prone to "biennial bearing" than others, but curing it is difficult - ...


8

Since woodpeckers don't eat wood, concentrate on killing the insects that the woodpeckers are actually eating (rather than "keeping the woodpeckers away" by some means other than removing their food source.) Though if the tree is as described, I'd also suggest taking scions to graft to new rootstocks as it may be in serious trouble and at least that way you'...


7

The traditional way to do this is to buy an apple tree which is grafted onto a dwarfing root stock such as E.M.26. You can keep fruit trees smaller but it's more work without the right rootstock. Keep in mind that even semi dwarf rootstock will "grow to be twice as tall as the average person". Things you can do are listed here but can be summarized as: ...


7

Here are three apple books I would recommend for detailed info about different varieties: The New Book of Apples by Joan Morgan - It's expensive but well worth the investment. Apples of Uncommon Character by Rowan Jacobson Apples of North America by Tom Burford You can find these and other fantastic books here. You can also see if your public library ...


7

Put the seed in a pot (if you want it potted) and put the pot in the ground; or plant directly in the ground. Wait for spring. The seeds require "cold treatment" - they are programmed not to sprout until they have experienced "winter" since seeds that sprout in fall lead to dead seedlings. The above method is the simple way to get that. If you like, you can ...


7

Ripening fruits produce ethylene, which in turn triggers ripening in not-already-ripening fruits - a feedback mechanism. So it may also be that by separating the fruits into different trays, you are localising this effect, so that the one bad apple doesn't spoil the whole damn bunch, or rather, the one ripening tray doesn't influence the other tray as much.


7

If you manage to catch a windfall apple before the slugs, then try that one (maybe cutting off a bruised or only slightly slug-munched side, and eating the other). If it's tasty, others with a similar colour will likely be ripe too. If you can't get lucky with a windfall, give a few ripe looking apples a very gentle twisting tug, if they come away easily ...


7

Disclaimer: we haven't identified the wasps in question Wasps are insectivores. If they are flyng back and forth between or around plants, they are on the hunt or scouting for food. The wasps' behaviour is harmless, but you might want to check your tree: if they suddenly hunt there a lot, it may indicate the presence of unwanted parasites like aphids.


6

If you are worried about it, put a 6' diameter circle of topsoil mixed with compost around the tree to a depth of about three inches. I do not recommend replanting as this will set back the tree. My method will actually speed up the maturity. It works especially well if you maintain a 1" mulch of organic matter around the tree. One of my trees has the graft ...


6

You can splice your twig right onto another established apple tree, cutting it back enough to give the twig room to grow. Then you will have two types of apples on that one tree - this is one way they make multi-variety trees in the retail trade and is probably the easiest way to get started with your new acquisition. You can also buy apple "rootstocks" (...


6

Take a close look. Usually the main graft of a fruit tree is a few inches above the ground. It will appear as a lump in the trunk. In a multiple cultivar graft, it may be higher. In any case, any branch coming from below the graft will be coming from the root stock. This will usually be either a special purpose root stock, or a crabapple. In either ...


6

In the end you want the wound to approximately follow the plane of where the branch split from the tree. You don't want to have a split or a shelf that would collect water as it will lead to rot. I would begin by cutting upward with a saw to finish severing the branch. Let us say the broken branch and tree trunk form an inverted 'V' - cut upward through the ...


6

Doesn't matter whether you're fan training, espalier or cordon growing, the best time for planting trees in the UK is September or October. If they're container grown plants, you can plant at other times, like February or March, if the ground is neither waterlogged nor frozen, but you will need to pay careful attention to watering during the first and second ...


6

I think it has the same name in English. Verde Doncella. It is a Spanish cultivar, so the Spanish name of the cultivar is also used in other countries. In the Netherlands for instance we also have apple cultivars with English names, such as "Golden Delicious" and "Granny Smith", we don't change them to Dutch names.


5

Apples will produce much less fruit when: they are not pruned so the branches shade each other a late spring frost when the tree is in bloom can reduce yields by 80 to 90 percent some trees produce more fruit in one year and much less in the following year. On that forum page, user mr.shep lists some other reasons for a tree not to produce fruit (list ...


5

Depends - is there anything resembling this on other parts of the tree, perhaps on the leafed branches? This could be woolly aphid, it could be scale eggs (some scale insects lay their eggs under white cottony threads like this), but if it was either of those, I'd expect to see further evidence on the rest of the tree. Otherwise, it could be some kind of ...


5

A larger caliper (larger-trunked) apple tree with spur-type growth habit will likely yield fruit sooner than the other options you've mentioned. Most commercially available apple trees will have been grafted onto a compatible root stock. Some of these root stocks will produce trees that fruit sooner - in particular, the dwarfing root stocks will cause a tree ...


5

I see some problems here: Fuji apple trees are not self fertile so you would need two late blooming apple trees to get any fruit set Anything less than full sun will reduce the amount of flower and fruit set. How your plants will do could vary depending on such hard to measure things as amount of reflected light, if there are drying winds to stress the ...


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