11

This looks like Zanthoxylum clava-herculis to me based on the distinctive look and region that you mentioned. It's also known as the Hercules' club, pepperwood, or southern prickly ash: Here's the range distribution map:


5

It's a dianthus; its wide green leaves indicate that it's probably a cultivar of Dianthus chinensis. These plants like cool weather and usually bloom in the spring in my area of the US - looks like you're living in a region with a mild winter, which means it will be a (possibly short-lived) perennial where you live. The flowers may smell sweetly of cloves.


4

It looks strikingly similar to these pictures in another identification post. Bamboo provided a bit more information about the plant called Ceiba speciosa. Perhaps the additional characteristics listed by Bamboo (bulbous base, not always pronounced) and the original poster of the similar/same identification question (thorns also present) are also true of the ...


4

Pothos, Devil's ivy, in Asia it is called money plant but I don't know why.


3

As I mentioned in another answer recently, this looks like Zanthoxylum clava-herculis to me based on the distinctive look and region (Louisiana) that you mentioned. It's also known as the Hercules' club, pepperwood, or southern prickly ash:


3

It's what is commonly known as a bracket or shelf fungus - they all are polypores and this group of fungi is fairly similar one to another in structure, but in outward appearance they come in a range of colours and sizes. When this occurs on a tree, it means the heartwood of the tree has been infiltrated already by the mycorrhizae - what you see on the ...


3

Looks like Bangalore Blue, except your sample is seedless. That is commonly grown in India. Grapes in the species Vitis labrusca, or crossed with them have the slip-skin characteristic where the skin detaches easily.


2

I have a feeling that looks like a young pampas grass. If it is, the edges of the long leaves are very sharp so be careful handling it as it can leave painful paper cuts. They can germinate from seeds blown on the wind from the fluffy plumes it produces in summer, when established, and can grow very big and wide.


1

Note how the leaves have a particular kind of vein arrangement, all curving in tune with the shape of the leaf, not the more complex branching arrangement from a main vein we see in the higher plants. This puts it in the same broad classification as corn and grasses and onions and orchids and other monocots. With the clumping at first it looks like a Hosta (...


1

Yes, it looks like papaya. The outer skin in the second photo looks like it has some greenish flecks which indicate it is not fully ripe. Leave fruit to go fully yellow all over and then pick. Use nose and softness of outer skin to judge. Papaya needs to be cut when fully ripe, otherwise it will taste a bit flat; they may not continue to ripen after cutting ...


1

The black-purple colour, with seedless characteristic and oval shape correspond with the Sharad Seedless variety, found in Maharashtra state. You might look to see if they come in possibly large bunches, another characteristic of the vine.


1

As you say ; a fungus = mushroom ( which I don't recognize ). However , that trunk of the lilac is likely dead and does not know it yet. I would cut that trunk to try to reduce growth of the fungus into the rest of the bush. The lilac will likely come back very well if pruned while dormant ( winter).


1

The two horns at the back (siphunculi or cornicles) are common in aphids, and useful features for identification. But less than 1mm is very small for aphids. It may be Aphis fabae, as a search indicates it can be present on your tree, and is 1-2 mm long. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_bean_aphid But not sure at all.


1

I'm pretty confident that the pictured plant is an Aeonium of some kind. The keys are The upright "trunk" and branching The flattened rosette of leaves at the end of each "stem" The way in which the leaves whorl about the center in each rosette The leaf shape If this is an aeonium, then care is relatively easy, beginning with "DO ...


1

Looks like some sort of bracket fungus. There is possibly some old dead wood - a felled tree trunk or root below the surface which it will be growing on. The darker part will be hard like wood or leather and the white is softer as in a mushroom. It could also be some form of puffball but it looks too firm in the photo. Puffballs will explode spores if ...


1

There are so many different cultivars of mint, I’m wondering if it actually is one. I had one last year that had leaves very like yours which was an apple mint. It was that same bright green colour as yours and softer and shorter than garden mint with slight furring to the leaves. That one smelled very like lemon balm too. I also had a ginger mint, similar ...


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