3

Looks like Betula pendula commonly known as Silver Birch. The white bark is typical of these trees - they do produce male and female catkins in early spring. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betula_pendula


2

I do not know your flora, but it seems Capsella bursa-pastoris, from Brassicaceae (cabbage/mustard family). Note: there can be more similar species in your region, but usually similar. You may recognize it with heart-shaped fruits. Note: heart has not the heart-shape, so in past they say it has shape of a shepherd bag (or better flask). You may see many of ...


2

Looks like winter savory... Satureja montana, is a perennial, semi-evergreen herb in the family Lamiaceae, native to warm temperate regions of southern Europe, the Mediterranean, and Africa. It has dark green leaves and summer flowers ranging from pale lavender, or pink to white. The closely related plant, summer savory is an annual plant.


2

Assuming that the plant is no more than 12 inches/30cm tall (and most likely shorter than that), then this is a common garden hyacinth, but one that's been in the ground awhile and has lost its compact growth habit. A photo from farther away would be helpful in this ID. I first thought we were looking at English or Spanish Bluebells (Hyacinthoides species), ...


2

Your plant is in a bit of a state so its hard to be certain quite what it is, but I think its Dracaena sanderiana, not a spider plant - this plant is often sold as 'lucky bamboo', when it looks like a collection of thin canes with maybe one or two leaves, but it can be grown as a foliage houseplant. It will not appreciate direct sunlight - indirect bright ...


2

This could very well be a tomato, or like others suggest in the comments, another member of the Solanacae (nightshade) family. Here an example of how young tomato plant looks like, very similar leaves. You can wait for the flowers and fruit, they can give more information.


2

This is a healthy Beaucarnea recurvata commonly known as ponytail palm, and no, it's not a bonsai. These are slow growing plants - they do best in bright daylight, with some sunlight if possible. Favoured temperature is around 70 deg F, though they will tolerate quite low temperatures. The bulbous bit at the bottom of the plant stores water, but you should ...


1

It looks like a member of the genus Vigna, which is the type of bean originating in the Old World, as opposed to the genus Phaseolus, the New World beans most western gardeners are familiar with (think runner beans). Judging by the color, your beans look a lot like mung beans, although the growth habit of the seed pods is slightly different. But judging by ...


1

Aloe 'Pink Blush' maybe, certainly looks very similar http://www.llifle.com/Encyclopedia/SUCCULENTS/Family/Aloaceae/22534/Aloe_cv._Pink_Blush


1

It is a compression fitting. The blue ring unscrews, a couple of wrenches on it and the black nut will be fine. For future fittings you need to identify the pipe size and material.


1

I think you'll find what your looking for here. https://www.selfsufficientme.com/fruit-vegetables/what-s-wrong-with-my-lemon-tree-the-fruit-tastes-awful


1

This is Iris japonica , details here https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/9281/Iris-japonica/Details. Although not considered particularly invasive, it does spread by means of long, slender, creeping rhizomes, and yours has spread quite a bit. If you can find another spot for it in the garden, move it there, preferably a place without paving nearby because it ...


1

Looks like peace lilly. Spathiphyllum wallisii, commonly known as peace lily, white sails, or spathe flower is a very popular indoor house plant of the family Araceae. The genus name means "spathe-leaf", and the specific epithet is named after Gustav Wallis, the German plant collector.


1

The appearance of the leaves which show intermittent patches of light and dark greens hints at a nutrient issue. Mixing the prepared soil with a significant proportion of sand, while improving drainage, does dilute the nutrient that the rest of the soil offers. Juvenile plants are adequately nourished by the large fatty seeds, but once that has been ...


1

A known phenomena among ferocactus species - this one possibly f. Herrerae, Juvenile spines at the tip are pink at the growth tip.


1

Definitely palm seedlings. No idea which palm. But I don't think it's Rhapis excelsa (lady finger palm) -- the ends of those leaves are typically square, not pointy. I've never grown them from seed, but when they put up a new shoot (they have multiple trunks), there are usually two short leaves on each frond, not one long thin one as in the photo. More ...


1

Looks like a Pygmy Date Palm (Phoenix roebelenii) to me. The leaves off the frond are relatively flat, and they are narrow and widely spaced. But the sharp spikes on the frond near the trunk are the biggest clue. I don't think it's Areca Palm (Dypsis lutescens, golden cane palm). Areca has more of a V shape to the leaves off the trunk. And the leaves are ...


1

Leaves look like the Christmas palm, adonidia. When the spotted/mottled look disappears when the palm tree is older, it could be this one... http://www.palmpedia.net/wiki/Adonidia_dransfieldii


1

just signed I'm from Tanzania. Found a couple of citrus plant outside my bedrooms window as I was "googling" for ID I came across, "orange leaves grow in a compound arrangement, with multiple leaves arising from a single bud. Lemon leaves have jagged edges, and the branches of the trees bear thorns. Oranges may or may not have toothed leaves"


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