6

Ricinus communis, common name - castor oil plant. Details here and here.


3

No need to worry. That’s a tuberous begonia - and it’s just too small to flower yet. Unlike the spring bulbs you may be more familiar with, these begonias have tubers that can go dormant (what you bought) and regrow again in spring and will flower when they are grown into good-sized plants. Take good care of it and expect flowers in a few weeks.


3

Take a look at Olearia macrodonta (New Zealand Holly). According to this website, it's "Very well established throughout West Cork now."


3

This looks VERY much like wild parsnip, which is a plant you need to remove as soon as you can.Here are some images to help with the ID: Leaves Stalk Flowers (umbels). Note that this site minimizes the risks of this plant. If this is wild parsnip, it's an invasive and potentially dangerous plant, so BE CAREFUL when removing it! The sap is phytotoxic and ...


2

Happened to my jasmine plant recently and it stopped flowering for a couple of months. I sprayed some alcohol on the underside of the leaves for a few days straight, trim away damaged leaves and fertilized the soil. She is flowering again almost immediately after that.


2

It looks like Houttuynia Cordata, or Chameleon Plant. (Also known by other names.) Used in Eastern medicine but considered an invasive plant by many who have it in their gardens.


2

It is a Delphinium; it has flowered whilst still very short. These usually reach a height of somewhere between 4-7 feet, depending on variety. You don't say how long the plant has been in situ nor where you are in the world, but the foliage is still growing upwards, and may yet reach a more normal height and produce more flowers. These plants are herbaceous ...


2

It looks like an Imperial Red Philodendron. It is supposed to produce the reddish leaves. As a general rule, water plants when the top inch of soil feels dry to the touch. Unnecessary re-potting is a main cause of plant failure. You should only re-pot a plant if it is root-bound (although some plants like to be root-bound). A couple of good signs of a plant ...


2

I think it is catalpa. In the midwest , the tradition if to severely prune them to about 10 ft. high so the flowers can be easily seen. When I first saw upruned ones in TX, I couldn't figure out what they were. I only saw the flowers because I was bird watching and many birds were attracted to insects in the flowers.


2

If the berries just turn black and aren't multicoloured, it is most likely wild grapevine (Vitis riparia); porcelain berry and wild grape are often confused with one another because of their similarity in growth habit and leaf shape. Further, identifying details and information on wild grape here https://www.ediblewildfood.com/wild-grape-vine.aspx


2

I've never heard of porcelain-berry, but looking at the Virginia Native Plant website, your climber certainly looks like it. In particular the "inflorescence ... is a cymose panicle – its umbrella-shaped top sticks up", as yours does. In contrast, "the inflorescence of our native grapes are panicles that are broad at the base, tapered at the ...


1

Looks like a lemon balm - rub the leaves, do they have a mostly-citrus, slightly-minty aroma?


1

That looks like mint. Can you break off a leave and spell to see if it's a mint.


1

This is going to be a slightly complicated answer! There are two plants which are quite similar to each other, and are often misnamed at point of sale; Mandevilla and Dipladenia. Both have trumpet shaped flowers, but the first is a vine and tends to climb upwards; it requires a support such as a trellis, whereas the second tends to trail downwards and doesn'...


1

Assuming that this had white flowers on it a few weeks ago, and assuming that you're in North America, I'd say that the shrub is a Chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa). The shrub might be about 3 feet high and wide, unless trimmed by your workplace's maintenance people. If I'm right, then the berries are edible, but only if cooked first (too bitter otherwise - ...


1

Looks like Tagetes (Marigold), did you have those last year by any chance?


1

Looks a bit like Lovage (Levisticum officinale). To know for sure you can try to smell the leaves, break it in your fingers, and if it smells like a soup broth it is Lovage.


1

Looks like Stachys byzantina. More information here.


1

Look around at the desirable plants nearby, and read the label on 2,4-D to see if that will have undesirable effects on any of them. Grasses and some woody plants are immune to 2,4-D if it's used in lawful quantities (you must obey the instructions on the label). Poison ivy, however, is killed good-and-plenty by it. You'll still need to leave the area ...


1

I believe it is a pear: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pear (Also, when trying to post only necessary and sufficient information for a response, I was confusingly told: "Body must be at least 30 characters")


1

The plant in the first picture is an Areca palm, also known as "dypsis lutescens" and the spots on the stalk are not harmful to the plant, and very common. They shouldn't last long and won't affect the plant.


1

In Iowa I am told it is called the California Thistle, and it WILL go to seed in the fall, in spades! It can infest a garden in one season!! The only way I have found to successfully kill them is to cut them off near the ground and soak the stump with Round-Up. Hitting the leaves will kill this years plant, but it will still go to seed, and the root will ...


1

I’m pretty sure that is Melia azederach. If yellow berries follow the flowers then it’s definitely a Melia, or chinaberry. I grew one in Sydney Australia, and it grew very fast and was a beautiful small tree, but it got attacked every year by processional caterpillars, which covered the whole trunk in their thousands. They even found their way into the house....


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible