5

I don't think it is "a plant growing from the tree". I think it was actually the last ditch attempt of the tree itself to stay alive. When the white shoot had grown up through the soil it would have turned green in the light as it started to produce chlorophyll. Unfortunately, digging it up won't have increased its chances of survival, even if you replant ...


5

It is a dracena, but very difficult to find which one. Closest match is the Dracaena afromontana which is an African plant, shown in my photo. I have not been able to find evidence of one with bicolored leaves with this size and presentation of fruit. But this is certainly an exact match for growth pattern, note how the fruiting branches are ...


4

Looks like a common garden spider to me. Perhaps the Banded Garden Spider or Wasp Spider. These are not dangerous to you. They are your friends. I keep mine on my raspberry plant so they can eat those pesky Japanese beetles.


3

Disclaimer: Under no circumstances can or should a post here be a substitute for qualified on-site medical advice. If any symptoms of poisoning are observed, contact your local healthcare provider. After the update: This is elderberry (Sambucus nigra). The berries contain low doses of cyanogenic glycosides (which produce prussic acid) and lectins. Typical ...


3

It's hard to know until the first flowers appear or the trees get much bigger. The male generally flowers first and produces only pollen. I think right now the size of the specimens, if they have not obviously been pruned, confirms the seller's claim that the smaller one is female since the male plants are much larger when mature. It looks like the producer ...


3

It is an elderberry, probably Sambucus nigra. The illustration shows berry clusters where the berries are immature, in the process of turning dark black. One of its advantages is that it is late flowering and will reliably form fruit since the flower clusters appear well after the last frost; also hardwood cuttings root very easily. The berries are good to ...


3

I think it might be Hoya carnosa - I note one of the shoots is variegated, so possibly H. carnosa variegata, though there's either been some reversion to plain green, or those are two separate cuttings which have been rooted into the same pot. Their trailing habit means they are often grown in hanging pots - indoors they like bright daylight, but don't ...


2

I really don't think it is any type of solidago. Perhaps horseweed (Conzya sp., or Erigeron sp. depending on which plant taxonomist you talk to), based on the branching of the inflorescence, the vase-like "flowers" (the involucre, more specifically), and the seeming overall ruderal aspect of the thing as Stephie suggested. Or maybe a fleabane (Erigeron in ...


2

Looks like a tamarind seed. The Tamarindus indica has a pinnate leaf as in your seedling, has distinctively shiny seeds and the leaves close at night. Mind you, there are many other tropical leaves that close at night as well, largely in the Mimosa family (also a pea type plant) but they have different seeds. Unfortunately it is not a baobab. Baobab seeds ...


2

It's probably fruit. The picture doesn't show much detail and its seems a little odd looking. Fruit doesn't normally displace tubercles, but who am I to tell a cactus how to behave. If it is fruit it will slowly ripen and slide out of its current location. Don't tug on it, wait until it comes out with the slightest pressure. On an unrelated note: Does the ...


2

It's hard to know from the information provided. Some details say it could be, but there are other plants that might qualify as well. Consider this picture for example, that of a woody vine (Cissus hypoglauca) in Australia and there may well be others with palmate 5 leaflets. Arguments no: normally by this size Brassaia actinophylla (Schefflera) has started ...


2

This looks poisonous, if your wife and daughter still feel sick of it, please go find some medical help immediately. This is probably Prunus laurocerasus, which is indeed toxic.


2

Most likely dogwood, I believe. It's hard to see the centers.


2

I would suggest that this is coffee, either arabica or robusta, but the berry stalks appear to be a bit long on this plant. The leaves are shiny and corrugated as expected. Normally coffee cherries are arranged in small whorls tightly clustered around the stem, this one seems to have loose clusters on a branching stalk; from Hortus III it might be Zanzibar ...


2

There are a couple of terms that will be useful to you in your researches here: dimorphism and phyllode. Dimorphism is simply the occurrence of more than one leaf type on a single plant, which is more common than you might think; take junipers for example where there can be sharp juvenile leaves and blunt mature leaves on one bush. Your example is related to ...


1

You're right - the tree IS a dogwood, specifically, Cornus kousa. There are more details here.


1

Espostoa species are mostly covered in greyish coloured hairs, except for one of two species when they are very young. Whatever it is, it looks like a desert cactus, so it will do fine with as much direct sun as possible and free draining compost. Whatever that brown stuff is (some sort of moss?) get rid of it! Make sure the pot has drain holes, so it won'...


1

I suspect, from the shape of the leaves and the 4 petalled flowers, and the fact its more of a vine like plant, they've based this on Clematis montana var. grandiflora, info and image here https://www.rhs.org.uk/plants/210221/i-clematis-montana-i-var-i-grandiflora-i-(m)/details. Artistic licence will have been used though - there are no stamens in the centre ...


1

These are artificial flowers, sorry. (Or not, if your baker can reproduce them.) They seem to be modeled based on dogwoods (four whiteish petals with a green tinge, green center), but dogwoods blooms are significantly larger and don’t grow as a vine.


1

Junipers have a characteristic odour when the foliage is crushed. It sure looks like a juniper. Different junipers are grown for their colour, shape, size. The colour you already know - the shape is more upright than spreading but not strictly columnar. Size is not predictable unless you get the description from the grower. When garden centres order in ...


1

This is Impatiens balsamina or Balsam impatiens. The stems are quite soft and almost translucent, can grow to about 2 feet tall and the leaves can be quite long and strap like. They can take quite a few weeks to come into flower from seed, so if you sowed the seeds direct into the garden say at the end of June then they should be coming into flower any time ...


1

Moonstones a species of Pachyphtum. Also known as Sugaralmond plant. The meaning of the name Pachyphytum oviferum is thick plant bearing eggs. The stems (20 cm long, 1 cm thick) rise then fall with about 15 leaves. These leaves are 3 to 5 cm long, 1.8 to 3 cm wide and 8 to 17 mm thick. Leaves are pale blue-green to bluish-purple, looking like a sugared ...


1

It's a rose, possibly Rosa rugosa, though there are others which produce large, bright red hips. The hips are formed after the flowers have gone and are actually seed pods; some roses are grown for their decorative hips rather than their flowers. Image of the flower and the hips of rosa rugosa here https://www.davidaustinroses.com/eu/r-rugosa


1

People will often only notice the rose when it is in blossom. This is what it looks like after the flowers fruit. There are some recipes that you'll find that need rose hip.


1

It looks like a Pachyphytum and less likely an Echeveria (Members of the Crassulaceae family), but possibly this is a hybrid. I don't think it may have such a long stem, possibly too little light. A jade plant (Crassula Ovata) has a different stem and leaves. The one in the middle appears to have a basal stem rot. That's why it looks "burnt". Cut it above ...


1

I think it is a member of the Crassula family (genus). The most popular member of this family is the Jade plant (Crassula ovata), but I am not sure if you have the same species here. Your plants seems to have a more lighter green than the Jade plant. Succulents like Crassula, don't need a lot of water. The soil can dry out between waterings, let's say give ...


1

It's confusing, no? The leaves look right but the flowers are wrong. Oregano has dense terminal spikes of flowers, these have whorls of flowers that are the right colour but down on the stem, not up at the top. If it has a square stem then this confirms is in the mint family as the whorls would indicate, but this family is very broad; typical mint leaves are ...


1

It is a Passiflora, it seems Passiflora 'Incense'. If you look in Wikipedia-Passiflora, you will see a very similar photo of your flower.


1

This is probably ricinus communis. With oversized, tropical-looking leaves and bizarre seed pods, castor bean is an exotic addition to the ornamental garden. The only member of the genus, Ricinus communis is in the Spurge Family (Euphorbiaceae). The word ricinus is Latin for “tick”, used for this plant name because of the superficial resemblance of the ...


1

It's called Canna indica or less formally Canna Lily. Mostly they have red flowers but there is a yellow variety as the wiki page shows. The large paddle shaped leaves are distinctive. They grow from a large thick rhizome root; it looks like this one will soon need more room to grow in that pot. They are native to the American tropics and like warm to hot ...


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