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Top insects are thrips: https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=876 and will be causing some damage, other insect is a psocid https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psocoptera and should not be a problem for the plant.


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It is Begonia grandis, or a B. grandis hybrid. It is considered a tender perennial, and I've tried to keep it here in Zone 5a without success. It is not difficult to control (i.e., it is not rampantly invasive) and it can produce white to pink flowers late in the summer. If happy, it can produce bulbils at the leaf axis, which will spread it. It is lovely ...


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Well, there are hundreds of species of plants native to Florida. See here for a comprehensive state-wide list. Florida is an interesting state, horticulturally speaking, because it encompasses three complete USDA hardiness zones and contains a number of different environments. This is what makes the plant list so long - what grows in the Panhandle is not ...


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It seems one of the Pulmonaria. There are many cultivars. I think you should wait for the flowers, to see which one it is. Tell your toddler not to touch any plant. As far I know, this is not dangerous, but you know the children: so maybe you should plant some bitter plant (but not toxic), so that your children learn not to eat from plants (if it is not a ...


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This is, as the comments say, a black locust. It can be identified by: compound leaves paired on either side of the stem spines or thorns are sometimes present but this varies widely within the species fragrant white showy flowers in the spring It should be noted that black locust is considered an invasive species across the world and in urban areas is ...


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I hybridize daylilies in zone 4. When collecting seed pods this time of year I always find some of these guys hiding out in the pods. Quite sure they dine on other insects who come into pods. Harmless.


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I can't comment yet. It could be a zebra spider. I've heard of spider mites (if they even are spiders) being a problem, but you don't tend to hear about larger spiders like this being a problem for plants. I wouldn't worry about them myself.


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I looked at the pictures and think this is Jack in the pulpit or Arisaema Triphyllum. The identification keys are that: native to eastern North America from Nova Scotia to Florida and including USDA zone 4 where I live close relative, Arisaema dracontium, has quite a different leaf shape but overlaps the range cluster of bright red berries in the fall the ...


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It looks like a hickory nut. Hickory nuts have 4 quadrants, like your nut. Try looking up pictures of hickory nut and see what you think (I've never seen such a nut in real life).


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Seems to be Mirabilis jalapa, common name four o'clock plant (probably because it opens its flowers in the afternoon). it's not a weed, but they do sometimes seed themselves. Info and image here https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mirabilis_jalapa


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Looks like watermelon vine. Wait and see what grows on it. Some of the big ones take months to develop so chances are you will not have time for fruit.


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It looks and sounds like kalanchoe, a common houseplant. Yours is more leggy than normal, so it would probably benefit from stronger light. I've had mine for years, and when I put it outside in the sun, it grew big, thick leaves close to the ground. But it's good not to increase the light too quickly, and like you said, kalanchoe plants are easy to please.


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That’s a beautiful plant! It looks like a very healthy pothos vine. Luckily, it’s a very hearty plant, and easy to care for. This is a great article about pothos care, but I’ll sum up some of the points here: Pothos like bright, indirect light, but they tolerate almost any type of light. They popular vines in offices and other low light areas. Some types of ...


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Very much looks like Crassula ovata (Jade tree). it looks like a real tree, not just a recently grown cutting. Very hardy with respect to heat and dryness. Not sure about repotting, but likely to be straightforward.


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