3

It looks like these seeds are from an Acer, based on the "helicopter" structure. To be able to tell the species you will need more information, pictures of the leaves or from less dried up seeds.


2

That's a phaelenopsis orchid. It's not growing from the trunk. If the plant is in a garden, then the roots have probably been attached to the trunk to mimic the way in which it grows in the wild. If not, then they probably look something like this.


2

They're cannas. This is actually a near-duplicate of this question. Cannas have very large rhizomes which, in the Northern US, are dug every fall, stored over the winter indoors, and then planted out in the spring. You would use this same method in a pot, but make sure that the pot is large enough! I would estimate that a seven-gallon pot is the minimum size ...


2

It looks like Peperomia, and judging from the shape of the leaves I would say a raindrop Peperomia (P. polybotrya). The Peperomia likes bright but indirect light, and warm temperatures. I have one on a north-east facing window, so it gets only a little bit of direct sunlight very early in the morning in summertime. Watering: let the soil dry up completely ...


2

This is a friendship plant (Billbergia nutans), which is indeed from the Bromeliaceae (Bromeliad) family. Here some pictures of the flowers, they originate from South America. Its an easy houseplant (very resistant to neglect), and is easily propagated by splitting. Here some more details about the plant.


1

This is known as a cup fungus (Peziza phyllogena) which commonly grows on decaying logs. The cup shape is distinctive, and the presence of the log helps confirm this. It can also grow on wood chips. Read the wiki article carefully to compare with your fungus.


1

I bought this plant for my house a few months ago. Over the winter it dropped 80% of its leaves and I was going to throw it out. Instead I cut back all the old branches that didn’t have any leaves on them and aerated the soil using chopsticks or a pencil. The next week I had loads of new leaves growing at the top of the plant and a month later the bottom as ...


1

Greenbriar is very common in E. TX , I eliminated them by cutting them whenever I found them on my lot. They are relatively persistent and each year I cut a few. They come up from potatoe-like tubers , but are not worth the work to dig up.


1

I think that what you've unfortunately run into is common greenbriar, Smilax rotundifolia or perhaps cat greenbriar Smilax glauca, although it could be one of a number of other Smilax species. Smilax is native to the Eastern US and S. rotundifolia is one of the more common species. It probably doesn't have leaves because it is still early spring, even in ...


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