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10

There are many possible types of fungi or slime mould that this could be but the cause and treatment are the same. The source is wood which is part of a soil mix that has been inadequately composted or sterilized. The culprit is eating the woody bits in the soil. You cannot control this just by removing the soil as it will be found throughout the soil. ...


10

The conditions for growing mold are warmth, soil consistently wet, little air movement and undisturbed soil, and the presence of spores to feed on the organic matter present. It is natural to find some spores in potting compost, not a big deal. The plant in the pot (probably Chlorophytum) has fleshy roots and can be allowed to dry down between waterings. So ...


8

There appears to be a long standing insect infestation, possiby whitefly (does anything rise up and fly about when you go near or disturb the plant?) or scale infestation of some sort. The leaves look somewhat sticky, they're unhealthy with evidence of damage on the stems as well - there are white dots on the upper surface of the leaves and I think there ...


7

It might, it might not, but there's no point in not removing the lid and exposing it to the air - it's come this far, and it may just be fine. If its not, then you'll have to start again, there isn't anything you can do to get rid of the mould (if that's actually what it is, and not just masses of tiny root hairs) anyway.


7

How much to water is a complex question where you have to evaluate how much light is present, the relative humidity and the water needs of the plant. Bulbs do not normally like wet feet. The amaryllis is now in a period of fast growth using up the energy stored in the fall. If the pot has drainage at the bottom and it is in high light then water ...


7

It is a fungus digesting the organic matter in the soil underneath the plant, and it is, if anything, beneficial. See the bark chips in the soil? They are what the fungus is breaking down. The white stuff you saw under the surface is mycelia. The part on the top is the reproductive material. It really only eats the undecomposed material, rendering it into ...


7

Your close up leaf images show an aphid infestation. In my experience, this is a highly persistent insect that infests chili plants amongst others with over 500 different types of Aphids specific to particular plants. My own chilli plant is over one year old and got infested while outside, and again when wintered inside. I've been spraying regularly with ...


6

It's quite hard to tell from the photographs - in the top one, there may be some mould growing towards the bottom, right hand side, and the soil in that pot does look quite wet. As for the second photograph, it's not quite in focus, and it has more the look of salt deposits from using hard tapwater to water with than mould. If you think you're reacting to ...


6

There is another non chemical treatment which should work, particularly for powdery mildew - 1 part milk to 9 parts water mixed in a sprayer, spray all leaves and stems, including under the leaves. Doesn't matter whether the milk is full fat or skimmed. The 'scientific' explanation as to why it works is there's something about the lactic acid which seems to ...


6

If you're watering with tapwater and have done so for a while, some of this white deposit might be salts from the water; however, in reference to your other query, the salt deposits would have been present whilst the plant was in your office, and it seems you've only noticed it recently. The photograph, with close inspection, does show there is some fungal ...


5

So there are two possibilities here, one is that you are indeed seeing mold, the other is you are seeing salts and mineral deposits on the surface of your soil. Mold is minimized by watering only when needed, but you should water deeply to prevent salts from developing on your surfaces. Salts develop when you have hard water (including softened water). If ...


5

Looks like Fuligo septica, one of the slime moulds, also known charmingly as dog vomit slime mould. Harmless, but not attractive, and very common where there are bark chips within the compost mix or on top of the soil. Allowing it to dry out between waterings might help a bit, but you might find it returns, so if it does and you really hate it, you may need ...


5

I think it might be Woolly Aphid, specifically Woolly Oak Aphid, especially as you're in Florida. The only thing I'm not sure of is I can't find anything that says this particular form of woolly aphid affects the woody parts of the tree; other forms of woolly aphid do so, coating branches with layers of what looks like white fluff or fur. Whilst a bit ...


5

My method: take all peppers and flowers. Then put in the soil some "Actara". This should be enough to save the plant, and not to poison yourself. Usually I take some pepper and I plant it again: they grow quickly, but your pepper plant is an hybrid, so not sure if seeds can generate plants, and the seedling will not be like the original plant.


5

Fairly sure you got slime mould Fuligo septica, commonly called dog vomit slime mould. Its substrate (what it grows on) is generally wood chips. It's not a fungus though as slime moulds fit into an entirely different taxonomic group. Here's a photo of dog vomit slime mould that looks very much like yours. They often show up after a heavy rain or if you ...


4

Change the environment to create one much more suitable for growing these plants. It's a good thing you told me where the Oregano was in the third picture, because it's next to impossible to tell. I'm afraid this particular planting arrangement isn't going to work because all the plants are crammed much too close together, with no opportunity for air flow ...


4

If it is mold, spraying or drenching with an hydrogen peroxide solution should kill it. Two tablespoons of 3% peroxide in a quart of water. It won't harm your sprouts.


4

The answer to your second question, "how prevent it from growing in the other 3", is as follows: Move this plant away from the other three Disinfect your tools every time you've used on the diseased plant If possible, disinfect your hands too. After you have saved the other plants, we can examine your first question, "How to kill the mold in the pot". ...


4

Try neem oil. My peonies get infected with powdery mildew every year and this is the only organic solution that seems to really work. It works immediately but you have to start applying it before the mildew sets in. Spray the whole plant liberally from all directions making sure to get the undersides of leaves. The powdery mildew washes right off. Follow the ...


4

I've found some useful information from Colorado State University: Prevention: Avoid late-summer applications of nitrogen fertilizer to limit the production of succulent tissue, which is more susceptible to infection. Avoid overhead watering to help reduce the relative humidity. Selectively prune overcrowded plant material to help increase air ...


4

This is totally common to have happen with new soil. It must not be sterilized very well or they added organic matter and fungal spores later. Not a problem. Use your fingers to 'fruff' up the top of the soil, might have to do that a couple of times but this fungal growth will stop. Very common when organic matter is added to the soil. How did you plant ...


4

This is a simple 'gray mold' that is absolutely not harmful. Rake the top of the soil and it should go away. What I am worried about is your watering practices. This fungus needs constant moisture and/or little ventilation to grow. Are these pots filled with potting soil or did you add garden soil or 'compost'? Do these pots have drain holes? Did you ...


4

This is usually a saphrophytic fungus - its there to consume dead material in the potting soil, but its continued presence indicates a watering issue, as well as air flow problems. If you are not watering too often so that the soil is constantly moist, assuming there's a drainage hole or three in the pot, if you allow water to collect in any outer tray or ...


4

This is perfectly normal for terracotta pots - they are porous, so deposits from hard water, fertilizers and so on seep through to the outside and, once dry, are noticeable. Believe it or not,some people like this 'aged' look and actually apply yoghurt or other dairy based products to encourage deposit formation on new pots. You can scrub it off ...


3

Mold can be lethal to seeds/seedlings if left unchecked. I germinated corn seed at one point, just to the point of root emergence, in wet paper (this was going to peat pots in the cold frame, and from there to the garden under cover, for a late May harvest). Out of the 2 lbs of seed, about 2/3 of them developed mold just as the root began emerging. these ...


3

Nothing should be left in contact with a lawn for longer than a day or two at most, left for a week or three, this is what happens if you do, particularly during cool weather and very cool nights. It looks like the grey area in the middle is actually dead, but the browner ring round the outside may have some life in it still. Even so, it's best to cut the ...


3

Not a problem, will go away as the soil dries out. The fungus is having a meal of the woody organic matter in the soil. No action is required on your part.


3

That is mold. It digests the damp organic matter in the potting soil, not the plant. While it won't harm the plant, it is often a sing of constant damp, which isn't healthy. In addition to your fungicide application, allow a layer of potting mix (about 1/2" deep) to dry out between every watering. When you water, water very thoroughly. And while your control ...


3

If it is really fungus that you see, and not just root hairs, it could be the symbiosis between the plant and the fungus which is called (arbuscular) mycorrhiza. The plant gets minerals from the fungus, and gives in return sugar back. Wheat and many crops need this symbiosis, so you don't have to remove it, it is part of how wheat grows properly. The ...


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