19

Preface: This answer is based solely on the search result. I'm not a gardener and I don't have any gardening knowledge to sufficiently answer this with full certainty. Looking at the picture, it seems the most prevalent thing is the blackening of the core. Researching that gave results to a similar symptom from Alternaria/Black rot. This is caused by ...


16

Those look like Birch Polypore, scientific name Piptoporus betulinus. This mushroom is global but found almost exclusively on birch trees. The polypore is called "saprobic," which means it feeds on parts of the tree which are already dead or decaying, so most likely that crack was there first. Now that the tree is infested, though, unfortunately it's likely ...


13

I would have said Blossom End Rot because that seems to be the most rot along these lines., and especially as you have it on a few of the larger fruit. It is caused by a Calcium deficiency. Check your MiracleGro - it is probably almost all NPK but might have Calcium in smaller quantities. Is that enough? I don't know. Usually the problem occurs more due to ...


12

Definitely looks like something from a sci fi/horror movie! Black areas within oranges are usually caused by a fungal pathogen - it enters most often at the 'navel' end of the orange and then spreads inside the fruit in varying degrees. It most often spreads up the central area, but can appear as small black areas in some of the cells of the orange. However,...


11

Looking closely at the last picture, there are clear dark concentric circles around the black spots which is textbook early blight. It is a trademark of the disease. Blight has been bad, really bad this year. Your best chance is unfortunately to pull the plants and save any remaining healthy plants. Then going forward there are some key cultural ...


10

That is Early Blight, Alternaria solani. The earlier you treat, the better the control, as a strong infection will build up resistance to the fungicide. Here's what to do: Remove all leaves showing signs of early blight (yellowing, dry margin, large to small round dead spots.) Do not touch the unaffected leaves with the removed portions, or your hands ...


10

The only time you usually remove leaves which are slightly damaged or part dead is if the plant is highly ornamental and it's detracting from its appearance, or the leaf is damaged by some kind of infection or invader. Otherwise, just wait for the leaf to shrivel and fall off naturally, or remove it when it's at that stage.


10

Small fruiting tomatoes tend to be a lot juicier (that is ratio of meaty pulp to juice) than medium or large fruiting. Tomato produces a skin of a certain size for the number of fruits it has, then as b.nota points out extra water arrives. The fruit is already turgid, the extra water has nowhere to go but to burst the balloon. It is particularly a problem ...


10

There are two main causes of fruit split - the first is irregular watering. Once tomatoes have fruitlets, and especially as they start to get bigger and ripen, its critical to water sufficiently every day, without missing a day or two, or giving a bit less some days than others. If you don't, then the tomato, receiving a sudden influx of water, swells ...


9

I'm thinking too that now would be a good time to transplant it into a larger container. In my experience, cukes don't do very well when they get root bound, and it looks like that is a definite possibility for you.


9

This looks like blossom end rot. Here is another source of info. According to the second link, which is from Clemson University: After tomatoes are planted, gardeners can minimize the potential for blossom end rot by doing the following: Once transplants become established, encourage the production of a large root system by keeping plants a little ...


9

Those white dots are spider mites. There are a lot of them so you will need to apply at least three treatments of soap and water at a rate of 5 ml /liter at five to seven day intervals. This will catch the next generation when they hatch. Don't put too much soap in the mix or you will burn the leaves with the fatty acid content of the soap. If you have ...


8

I volunteered at a heritage garden (shameless plug for a place worth visiting) that had old crab apple and their bark did exfoliate or peel in little scales about two inches high by an inch wide. This is normal for mature crab apple and apple trees. What is in your pictures doesn't look like a mature tree with a trunk over eight inches in diameter and ...


8

I'd hazard an educated guess at bad growing conditions - it looks as if this plant is in a pot, which presumably has drainage holes, sitting inside an outer container which probably does not. Succulents like to be kept on the dry side, preferring well drained conditions - if you've watered that too often, and not emptied the outer pot of all water twice ...


8

There are many possible types of fungi or slime mould that this could be but the cause and treatment are the same. The source is wood which is part of a soil mix that has been inadequately composted or sterilized. The culprit is eating the woody bits in the soil. You cannot control this just by removing the soil as it will be found throughout the soil. ...


8

I think you have Cucumber mosaic virus, because of the mosaicing, curling, and drying of the leaves, and the stop in production, plus the time frame of infection matches perfectly. There is no cure. What you can do is try to keep it from spreading, which is done by removing affected plants from the environment. Burn or seal them in bags to prevent the virus ...


8

The likelihood of disease is not more likely when planted in close quarters, but if one species contracts a disease, it will likely pass it on. To avoid this, planting them apart should do it, anywhere that no blown leaves/running soil will reach them. Now I don't worry about it myself, I put everything together. Disease control in untreatable diseases ...


8

Your plant appears to be an Areca palm which is now known as Dypsis lutescens. This looks like a combination of factors: overwatering promotes anerobic conditions in the soil which promote fungus. The black spots and brown spots are indicators of this. Another identification is the classic signs of fungus growth which is a spot with a ring on the inside ...


8

Probably Apple Scab, which is an issue where you are, as it is in many parts of the world. It's caused by a fungus, and it affects the twigs behind the fruits and often the leaves too. Some info in the link below, but it looks as if you'll need to spray with a copper solution to get some kind of control. How easy that will be in a large tree, I leave you to ...


8

Alstonia scholaris (L.) R. Br. is a very beautiful ornamental tree, which is commonly known as pagoda tree because of its pagoda like growing habit. It is commonly infected by the Homopteran, Pauropsylla tuberculata Crawf which leads to unsightly gall formation on the leaves as pictured. The gall is the leaf response to the infection by the parasite which ...


8

Looks like you have at least two problems. Let's take the last image first which appears to show Citrus Leaf Miner damage. You can see the channels that the miner has burrowed into the leaf. The other images show a plant under a lot of stress. The leaves show a lack of nutrients - the stem looks as though it was strong and healthy at one time, but then ...


7

The last picture clinches it - it's undoubtedly scale. Scale is really hard to get rid of entirely. For most of the lifecycle it's very tiny and impossible to spot all of. It spreads to other plants. It leaves a sticky residue underneath the plant that's hard to remove. So... consider tossing the plant. You can slow it down a lot with organic sprays, ...


7

tomato blossom end rot is caused (generally) by a lack of calcium, sound like you are amending the soil, but in my area, The Great Basin the lack of calcium is caused by too much limestone clay, causing the soil to be so basic that the calcium isn't available (ie too much calcium means too little available to the plant) introduction of organic matter ...


7

As it turns out, the answer was as Mike Perry suggested in the comments on the question: wait and see. One year after I posted this question, the previously "bad" Lupin is growing and flowering strongly, while the "good" Lupin is a lot smaller than last year, but otherwise looks healthy:


7

This is a dwarf Alberta spruce (Picea glauca conica). They grow slowly and burn easily if sited so they are exposed to cold winter winds. Sadly almost all of eastern North America was subject to very cold temperatures in the winter of 2013-2014. Your spruce looks a lot better than many I have seen. Even my dwarf white pine suffered burn on the south side ...


7

Here's the biggest difference: Late blight is caused by the pathogen Phytophthora infestans, while early blight is caused by Alternaria solani. Phytophthora infestans is an oomycete, a fungus-like eukaryotic microorganism. It is similar to Alternaria solani (a fungus) in that it is a localized disease, and doesn't spread internally. P. infestans is a more ...


7

Scale infestation - brown scale in fact, not that it matters. If you've got some rubbing alcohol or some methylated spirits, dip a cotton bud (Q tip) in and rub off the scale from the stems, being careful not to douse the stems or leaves in the spirit solution. The immature ones on the back of the leaves (paler, smaller) are susceptible to oil sprays such as ...


7

Bacterial leaf spot infection. There is no cure, but you can try to avoid it next season. Here are some tips: Cultural: Clean up and burn/landfill fallen leaves/fruit. Don't compost. Loosen the soil around the base of the plant. Add 1" of rich compost to the soil. Mulch well with an organic mulch to help conserve moisture Water whenever the ground is ...


7

It's certainly possible to spread some fungal infections on gardening gloves and tools you may have used. Given you're wearing rubber gloves, after handling diseased plant material, its sensible to go indoors and wash your gloved hands, in a similar manner to that you would use if you weren't wearing gloves, in between healthy and non healthy plants; the ...


7

Peach trees are deciduous and lose their leaves in the winter, so don't worry about that. The leaves can turn gold/brown before they drop. Some munched leaves on a healthy tree are not a problem. Hopefully you have a tree that requires very few chilling hours to produce, if it was purchased locally you should be okay. It is very young, but you should get a ...


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