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21

It seems to be a garden centipede - they don't damage plants, they predate other creatures rather than plants. They like to hide in damp places during the day, they need moisture to survive, so possibly it was hiding underneath your plant pot and only ran when it was flooded out. More info here http://www2.fcps.edu/islandcreekes/ecology/garden_centipede.htm


15

Looks like a red pumpkin beetle Aulacophora foveicollis


13

Cracking tomatoes happens when the (almost) ripe fruit expands and the skin can't hold up any more. (A bit like stretch marks...) There are a few causes that typically lead to different crack patterns, but sometimes it's a bit non-conclusive, so I won't go into detail. Excess water, especially after a drought - water as consistantly as possible, protect ...


13

They look to be aphids. You can squish them with a pinch of your thumb and forefinger (you do not need to squeeze so hard as to crush the leaf). Repeat every time you see them, until you don't see them anymore. They are also easily jetted off with a spray from a garden hose, but I doubt you want to do this with an indoor plant. Most insecticides, including ...


12

I'd be very surprised if its actually rats eating your plants - rats will eat almost anything, but plants would be the last thing on the list, unless its a fruiting vegetable plant such as corn. You may have rats coming to check out the balcony, especially if, at any time, you've eaten out there or left other foodstuffs lying around, including things like ...


11

How to check for spider mites. Spider mites live on the underside of leaves, and are reddish brown or pale in color, oval-shaped, and very small. Obvious signs of infection are white webbing, yellow blotches on leaves, and even silver or bronze streaks. If an infection gets particularly bad, leaves can start falling off. To confirm an infection, take a leaf ...


11

As far as I can tell, there is very little empirical data on garlic and mosquitoes. And all of the studies I have seen show mixed results for ingesting garlic or using garlic as a mosquito repellent. That leaves you with anecdotal evidence, so here's mine. My garlic patch used to be 30 some feet from my deck. A few years ago, I moved it so it is now just ...


10

Spiders eat meat (bugs), hence the web to trap them, and have no interest in eating plants. If you're seeing spiders, you probably have bugs that they're eating. If you remove the spiders, the bugs are free to eat the plants unencumbered. I would leave them. The caveat to this would be if the spider is a black widow, though its hard to imagine a black ...


10

Most spiders are friends to your garden, they eat insects, likely including pests you want gone. I can think of one true spider that you might not want getting cozy in your garden. Meet the Brown Recluse: That darker brown fiddle-shaped marking on the head is suggestive of the species. Their eyes are more distinctive, one pair at the center, two pairs to ...


10

I don't think those are eggs. I think they are aphids. Put your gloves on and squish them. It will be easiest, and little is in fact lost, to just remove heavily infested tissue, such as the leaf you show; crush it as you discard it. A jet from your garden hose will usually remedy problems before they become serious if you just make a habit of 'blasting' ...


10

A photo would be great, but maybe some of the caterpillars have fallen prey to a parasitic wasp and what you're seeing are the wasp larvae, see image below https://www.wired.com/2014/10/absurd-creature-week-glyptapanteles-wasp-caterpillar-bodyguard/ Otherwise, could they be pollen grains?


9

Those are grubs. There are a lot of kinds of grubs, though, and they look so similar, you often can only tell them apart by their rear ends (seriously, see below) They feed on roots (usually turf, but also trees, perennials, and other plants) as larvae, and then emerge from the ground as beetles, which feed on the leaves. I think they might be masked chafer ...


9

These are Froghopper larvaes. Also, known as Splittlebugs. Wikipedia also shows the adult which I, of course, have seen in my garden. Best thing about it: They are harmless in small quantities. No need to treat. Update: Look who turned up this evening: a parent (Cercopis vulnerata)


9

Spiders in the garden are total GOOD GUYS. The amount of insects they control is wonderful!! They will not bother you! Now Tagenaria aggrestice or the Hobo Spider, Aggressive House Spider, Wolf Spiders...Brown Recluse you DON'T WANT in your home. If they bite you you will probably need antibiotics or the necrosis could turn into gangrene. Not cool ...


9

Agreed, its an aphid infestation, specifically what's known as Oleander Aphid, which affects plants in the Apocynaceae family (which Adenium belongs to) as well as Asclepiadaceae - more info in the link below, if you really want to know about it in detail, but if you've got neem or horticultural oil as a spray, that should work in getting rid of them. I ...


9

Your Pokemons are waxy scale, or coccidae. Your description in the comments above is spot on: another name is "tortoise scale". The Florida wax scale (Ceroplastes floridensis) looks quite similar, but I wouldn't venture a definitive id based on a few photos, Ceroplastes japonicus (pictures) is another possible candidate, and there are more Ceroplastes. As ...


8

Grubs like the one you've pictured feed on plant roots. If there are a lot of them, then yes, they are doing damage. You may just not be noticing it yet. The worst part is they will eventually pupate into adult beetles, and those will work on damaging the above-ground parts of your plants. If they are Japanese Beetles (hard to say without more info but the ...


8

I'm going to guess fungus gnats because I always think tiny black bodied winged bugs are fungus gnats but in this case I think I'm right. :) It looks like you have the plants in containers. Is that how you purchased them or did you pot them yourself? I had purchased a bag of organic potting mix once that was infested with fungus gnat eggs. Once I watered it ...


8

I would recommend just warning them and not treating the soil at all, unless they request a specific treatment when you ask, or unless they're in another state or you know your soil has particularly bad weeds, pests, pathogens or something. You could pour boiling water on the soil to kill weeds and bugs, but it will also kill beneficial soil microbes, which ...


8

The cracks are a physical injury caused by the tomato plant going from too dry to wet too fast. When the plant goes through a sudden change like that the fruit goes from being short on water to suddenly having plenty of water, so it takes in a lot of water very fast and the skin doesn't stretch fast enough to keep up. The skin splits near the top and then ...


7

While the drawing you have uploaded doesn't match any Douglas Fir specific beetles I've been able to locate online, the damage you described sounds very much exactly like the kind of damage a bark beetle infestation would produce. Beetles that attack trees generally lay eggs just under the bark, and their larvae will then eat their way through the living ...


7

Use an ant moat. You could build one yourself but the ones you can purchase are inexpensive and essentially consist of a cup that holds water and creates a barrier between the shepherd's hook and the hummingbird feeder. The ants won't be able to cross the barrier - at least they don't on ours. That style - same style I have - can leak a bit and if the ...


7

I've found that trees can put up with a lot. Oak trees are seldom affected by galls unless there is a heavy infestation. Galls on the leaves are not a worry, and oak trees will tolerate them quite well. You can rake up and destroy the leaves when they fall, if they are causing aesthetic issues. Pesticides are rarely effective. The kind that can be damaging ...


7

Cracking in tomatoes is almost always caused by uneven watering. My guess is that the soil in the shady spot of your garden is able to retain water better, so the plants in the shade have more consistent access to water. The soil in the sun is probably drying out more in between watering, so those plants have less consistent access to water. Watering the ...


7

The brown dots are an advanced infestation of scale. This is not the fig scale which looks pinkish and has an unusual shape but a more common variety. This is a common pest and regardless of the species control is the same. The white dots could be young scale or whitefly attracted by the sticky sap the scale excretes. You can learn more from this link: ...


7

There are so many species (and genera for that matter) of spider mites that one set of guidelines is likely not going to fit all of them. If you ask about a specific kind of spider mite, you might get a better answer (provided much is known about it). I recommend learning which spider mites are indigenous to your area, and observing how they behave. Expect ...


7

That is not so small an area. Four square meters ~= 43 Square feet I would just sod this and have the job finished in a few hours. A typical sod roll measures 24" x 81" or 2 ft x 6.75 ft. Each roll of sod will cover 1.5 sq. yds or 13.5 sq. ft So this could require up to 4 rolls of sod depending on wastage. Where I live this costs about $5/roll or $20. ...


7

Well, I wouldn't be using any of those, particularly not imidaproclid, and I don't keep bees - that substance has been or is about to be withdrawn in the EU for two to five years to see if it impacts on the bee population, because there is such conviction of its environmental impact on bees generally, never mind whether its sprayed on open flowers or a plant ...


7

Disclaimer: we haven't identified the wasps in question Wasps are insectivores. If they are flyng back and forth between or around plants, they are on the hunt or scouting for food. The wasps' behaviour is harmless, but you might want to check your tree: if they suddenly hunt there a lot, it may indicate the presence of unwanted parasites like aphids.


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