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It's a slime mould called Fuligo septica, common name dogs vomit slime mould or sometimes, scrambled egg mould. It's there because it's wet and there's plenty of dead wood in the area on the ground. When the weather or the soil/wood dries out, it will disappear - it's harmless to your plants, just looks horrible. https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/55483-Fuligo-...


4

When the female sago palm flowers, the 'flower', which looks nothing like the usual idea of a flower (they look more like orangy, ferny growths) is situated exactly where the orange fuzzy stuff is in your image, see here http://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Sago%20Palm.html. Since the tree is otherwise healthy, this may be the remains of flowering -...


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The picture shows a shelf fungus, which indicates that the mycelium of the fungus has spread throughout the trunk. I'm very sorry, but this tree is terminally ill. My opinion is that you should cut it down before it breaks in a storm.


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It's a slime mould, often commonly known charmingly as Dog Vomit slime mould - its actual name is Fuligo septica. It appears usually during very damp weather, or in damp areas, in spring/early summer and again in fall, and is likely to be seen on anything woody, including wood chips, though it can sometimes appear in lawns. It will just disappear as the area ...


2

The fuzzy white stuff seems to be the Woolly Apple Aphid (Eriosoma lanigerum). This is quite a serious pest of apple trees. These aphids form colonies at wound sites, where they feed on bark. So ironically, by pruning your tree you have probably been encouraging the spread of the aphids, since you've been creating lots of new wounds for them to infest. Wooly ...


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There is a natural flow of nutrients in solution from the root hairs up to the top of all plants where growth is happening. One result of this process is that as the sap reaches the top and the nutrients are used up what ends up on the leaf surface evaporates. Only the water can leave, so this process can leave behind salts and other minerals on the surface ...


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Oaks begin as acorns which are a large store of nutrient to get the seedling going. At the end of the first year the chemistry needs to transfer from nutrition from the acorn which rapidly depletes to feeding from roots. In the transfer it can happen that the seedling will steal nutrients from older parts of the plant to send out the new leaves. The leaf ...


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I don't think it's mealy bugs. Or at least, this is completely unlike any stage of a mealy bug I've seen yet. Unfortunately I've been battling an infestation this season, the big fat grayish mature mealys, the little tiny white baby mealys that are almost sesame seed shaped but a bit smaller, as well as the fuzzy/gooey egg sacks. I now have these fuzzballs ...


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Some fungus similar to shelf mushrooms. The bark looks abnormal as if damage has been developing over time. Likely the fungus has "roots" into the wood and the trees days are numbered. However, it may live for years. I had an oak with a shelf mushroom that gradually died over 20 years. I doubt there is any way to stop it. Plant another tree nearby ...


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I think it is armored scale with gall (the white stuff). The bugs are so small and flat that you don't recognize any insect parts, the white stuff is gall resulting from the infestation. You can use a magnifying glass to see if you can recognize bugs. Simple method to get rid of it is to brush them off with a toothbrush, like described here, the second ...


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Information from Google is essentially worthless, unless you've discovered a reputable source. For lawn questions, I like to use The Lawn Institute, a science-based organization committed to providing information on lawns and lawncare. Here's a link to their Lawn Diseases page. Note that there is information about cultural control (which is what you're ...


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This is scale. I looked up a great reference here on scale only to find that there are more types, colours and shapes than I could possibly imagine. I think your plant has soft brown scale. Scale on citrus is one of the most likely pests. This is an advanced infestation but you can verify my diagnosis by confirming that the rim of the pot and around it is ...


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The mildew that affects many squash plants grows on the surface, and can be scraped off. The white patches you show, which are exhibited by many squash varieties, are internal to the leaf tissue.


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Turns out they are Assassin bug (Reduviidae) eggs


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It doesn't look like a fungus or mushroom to me. I think you have slime mold, something in the Arcyria genus. Mycelium doesn't usually grow above the top inch of soil--but slime mold colonies will come up if conditions are right. They're really cool and most species are benign to plants. They're not a mold, actually related to amoebas! They live as single-...


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Thanks for the link. You can reuse the soil, but only if you don't mind more fungal growth - the soil obviously contains mycelium, which you cannot see, and mycelium produces fruiting bodies such as toadstools, mushrooms and the extrusion present in the linked picture, depending on which type of mycelium is present. If you have a garden, put the soil out ...


1

Don't move the wood! We don't have any ash trees within 50 miles of where I live and the same is true for much of the east coast of North America and Europe. This is due to the Emerald ash borer whose larvae eat the tissue under the bark. This insect has spread widely and caused the death of millions of ash trees at a cost in the billions of dollars. Your ...


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If a tree was cut down to prevent the spread of an infections disease and/or invasive pest, then you shouldn't relocate the wood to a location that doesn't already have that disease or pest. In general, wood from an infested tree can spread the infestation to uninfested trees. Since you aren't sure what disease those trees had, you have no way to check ...


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The yellowing and black spots are more likely the plant in its previous condition as pot-bound lacking nutrients for new growth, so it steals required elements from the older leaves to feed the new. The extraction of the required elements deprives the old cells of what is required for regular functioning so they die off in spots. If you see more of the ...


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This cactus has downy mildew. It can occur with a lot of shade and high humidity and colder nights. Get some neem oil. Mix with a few drops of dish detergent and spay after the sun goes away. repeat ever 5 days for one month. The white spots are the fruiting body of the fungus. The brown is another type of fungus. Neem oil prevents spread and the fungus ...


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Looks like dry rot=fungus. Once it is in the wood it is unlikely that it can be saved. However it may live several years. Removing any infected wood is all I know to do; that won't save it but may extend life.


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This is a fungus/virus/bacteria but it is growing inside the leaf so neem oil or baking soda will not control it. The most likely cause is overwatering. When the roots cannot get enough oxygen because the spaces in the soil are filled with water infections like the ones seen in your picture move into the weakened plant. I recommend: reduce watering improve ...


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Black spots on leaves are most often a fungal infection. You can either remove the leaf, ideally without waving it around in the air thus circulating the spores, or apply something like Neem Oil which is an anti-fungal solution. You may wish to dilute it (1% product to 99% water) to start with, or apply sparingly. Or you can try a more traditional treatment ...


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It looks like edema. The leaves should be bumpy underneath, if so. I'd increase ventilation, keep the leaves dry (don't get them wet when you water), maybe lessen the temperature and humidity. Adding extra potassium can also help. Edema isn't a pest or disease. It's just a condition caused by growing conditions (common when growing indoors under artificial ...


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This appears to be a scale infestation. They are small sap-sucking bugs that become immobile once they stick on to a part of the plant and start feeding off of it. I recommend using 2 parts rubbing alcohol and 1 part water on a cotton ball to rub the insects off the underside of the leaf. Go over the plant every two days and remove all bugs you see. A q-tip ...


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This is known as a cup fungus (Peziza phyllogena) which commonly grows on decaying logs. The cup shape is distinctive, and the presence of the log helps confirm this. It can also grow on wood chips. Read the wiki article carefully to compare with your fungus.


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