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9

Are they like the ones in the photo? Those are the "juvenile" spines. Depending on the variety they will fall off, or they will develop in to proper spines. The cactus is an Opuntia or prickly pear. These hybridize easily and they are the most diverse type of cactus. They are also very easy to grow. Not all of the classic "pad" Opuntia (like yours) develop ...


8

Check the stems. Are they just limp, or are they decaying at the base? And check the soil. Is it dry all the way through? What I suspect to be the case is: Cacti need water too, just not as much. If the mix is dry all the way through, that is too dry. If that's the case, give it a good watering right away. The limpness, if there are no signs of rot, is ...


7

In the case of the aloe (plant on the right) it's because trying to root aloe from cuttings is different from most and might involve a little luck. Most places I've read say that it just won't root from a cutting, instead it rots like yours has. Usually Aloe plants are propagated from the smaller plants that sprout off the side of the main plant (called pups)...


7

When you first got this cactus, with its red ball like growth on top, it would have been named Gymnocalycium mihanovichii friedrichii (common name Hibotan or Red Cap cactus), but really, that name only refers to the upper, red part, which will have been grafted onto a plain green cactus because the red cactus lacks chlorophyll. What's happened with yours is,...


7

Rodents do eat Opuntia (also known as prickly pear) varieties - not necessarily rats, but other rodents too. You've not said what variety of cactus, but if it is one of the Opuntias, then likely the culprit is a rodent of some sort. Information can be found in this link: Rodents That Eat Prickly Pear Cactus which refers to the States, so you may have your ...


7

These cacti seem very happy to me, they even started to get a baby! Wow! I am not sure how much light they get there on the dinner table, but many cacti are fine in the shade. Cacti in general are easy plants, the only tricky part is giving it too much water. Mostly, a cactus needs water every month or two weeks. Never leave them in "wet feet". Furthermore, ...


6

Opuntia humifusa pads are edible. Here are a few of the pages that name O. humfusa as edible: ozarkedgewildflowers.com chicagonow.com www.ebay.com (um) everwilde.com learn2grow.com And the list goes on. Of course, it is possible for some people to have reactions to foods others are fine with. If you often have allergic reactions to things, I'd be ...


6

My experience with the prickly pears I have here in Texas (natives and cultivars) is that the wrinkling is typically due to under-watering. The seed pods (tunas) will also wither in low water conditions (I have yet to get my own tunas). Under-watered pads will appear thin. Over-watered are going to appear fat. I have yet to over-water prickly pears. I don't ...


6

Yes, they will root if you put them into a very sandy, free-draining mix kept slightly damp at all times, preferably with bottom heat, but if that's not possible, keep it in a warm, bright place. Light is essential, but extremely intense light at this time may dry out the pad. You won't have this issue during winter, as the sun is low in intensity. The ...


6

You can graft it back. If the wound has already dried, use a very sharp knife, as in a proper sharpened and honed chef's knife, and slice off a pickle slice off the top piece and bottom piece. Wrap the cactus gently but firmly with cotton string, your common classroom white string is perfect for this. Wind the string around the cactus avoiding the spines, ...


6

I agree that this intriguing plant appears to be a Tephrocactus Articulatus, var. Papyracanthus, commonly known as the Paper Spine Cactus. According to Cacti-guide: It's a small genus in the subfamily Opuntioideae. It's name was derived from the Greek word for ashes, "tephra," referring to the color of the spines. Some species in this genus are very ...


6

I actually saw some of these in walmart, just the other day. They kept them with the Living Trends succulents and cacti. The blue color is just paint or dye. They had the same type of cactus painted many different colors. It's like when they glue the bright plastic flowers on top of the little bulb like cacti and people buy it thinking it's real and it'll ...


6

It's an orchid cactus, Epiphyllum oxypetallum, also known as Night Blooming cactus - can be grown in a trailing fashion if given plenty of sun and little water, as a more upright plant given shade and more water. Not frost tolerant, needs temperatures above 40 deg F. Flowers should be fragrant, and only last one night, more info here http://...


6

I think that's a Euphorbia, not a cactus. Similar to E. grandicornis. The tell is that the thorns aren't coming from an areole, they're growing from the edge of the plant. All cactus are succulents, not all succulents are cactus. Hopefully, a Euphorbia expert will chime in with an ID.


5

It appears to be a young Mammillaria longimamma, which can produce yellow flowers.


5

Plants grow in different patterns... most of a plant can't grow like an animal, because of the physiology of the cell, plants (with very few exceptions) have cell walls made of cellulose... so it is useful to think of an adult plant cell as a brick... and you can't easily expand a brick structure from the middle. so plants grow in small regions call "...


5

Heaps of sun can turn parts or whole cacti a purple or burgundy hue. When the heat is on and you have cacti in outside pots, the roots and plant can also start getting damaged from overheated roots and frequent watering. Keep them in pots that don't overheat (avoid black plastic) and the media should be coarse but still retain some moisture without soggy ...


5

Well, maybe you could also explain why you'd prefer a terrarium. A Cactus can easily be happy out of the terrarium in a room, there is no need for a terrarium, Terrarium gets hot and humid exactly opposite what a cactus is used to They are used to hot and dry lands, and their fleshy organs will fail in humid or cold weathers, bacteria and diseases will ...


5

I don't think you are overwatering at twice a month. What I DO see are salt deposits on top of your soil. This is from softened tap water. Not good. Repot with soil made for cactus. Check the roots. If any are mush, cut them off and wash them. In fact, if the roots supporting the yellowed barrel are mush, I'd probably get rid of that part of the plant. ...


5

Off the top of my head, I'd say Portland is too wet. PP is native to areas that get under 15" precip per year. That said: The spot you describe sounds ideal for them. Two possible problems: Cacti generally don't tolerate wet soils, or even soils that are moist a lot of the time. You may need to take out the top 4-6 inches of soil, and replace with a ...


5

What you're seeing there is quite normal callous formation - it's a bit like a scab when you've cut yourself. The cause of the corky callous layers is damage - either from insects, or sudden chilling, physical injury and sometimes, underwatering in summer. I'm no cacti expert, but it's possible, from your description of some of the new growth 'dissolving' ...


5

I think this is Trichocereus peruvianus - the discolored area at the base is typical of callous formation following damage of some sort. No idea what could have caused it though, there's nothing glaringly wrong with it otherwise, but it can be caused through physical injury, insects or sudden chilling, so you might want to check or keep an eye on it in case ...


5

Very much so. I have done similar cuts many times on cacti and succulents. If you cleanly cut off the top 6 inches or so and pot it up it should root quite easily. And then remove all but the bottom 6 inches and leave it to regrow and you will have two lovely cacti!


5

That is indeed a member of the aloe family. As others have said, there are hundreds of types. A good list is provided here. I don't know enough to narrow it down. A Google search brings up pictures which may be helpful. This site about identification, care, and uses for aloe has a picture that looks similar to yours. Aloe is easy to care for, and can live ...


5

I've never bothered with drying them. I just plonk them vertically in some sandy soil - I may need to prop them up at first until roots grow. Then they will grow. It might take a while - cacti are slow growing, and it has to grow roots first. Ideally I try to take a cutting that has some buds - then you will see growth more quickly. The existing buds will ...


5

I've propagated a lot of prickly pear. They root easily and grow roots faster than most cactus. You could just stick it in soil a few days after cutting, forget about it, and it will most likely grow roots. That being said, it's best to give the cactus more than a few days for the wound to heal, a fresh cut is more susceptible to disease or fungus. I ...


5

Try this one; drunkard cactus, little bottles Let's see if this name works for this plant. I like the drunkard part because it looks like lots of little bottles...grins!


5

I think this is Turbinicarpus horripilus, see here http://www.cactus-art.biz/schede/TURBINICARPUS/Turbinicarpus_horripilus/Turbinicarpus_horripilus/Turbinicarpus_horripilus.htm I can see the whitened areas you're talking about, but it's hard to tell whether they're soft and soggy or quite dry - they may actually be corky areas, because they're more ...


5

How sure are you, that this is a fungus? To me, it looks suspiciously like scale, although the photos are a bit blurry. Try to pry off one of the bigger thingies. If my suspicion is correct, you'll find a shell-like object (actually an insect) that pops off in one piece. We have more Q/As on scale, in short, typical treatments are spraying with neem or an ...


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