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18

This is called Marcescence. Some species of trees retain their old leaves longer than others, and young trees may retain them longer than old trees. In the UK, "copper beech" trees (with naturally brown or purple coloured leaves even in summer) which are sometimes used for ornamental hedges often retain the old leaves right through the winter. It may be a ...


14

What's done is done, but in future years, as others suggest, collect up the leaves and compost them separately, either in a contained heap or in binliner bags with holes in the bottom. Leaves should be wet, crammed in a binliner, the tops tied shut, holes poked in the bottom, then left in a corner somewhere to rot down over a year or so, by which time they ...


13

The leaves in the picture looks like ferns. As you may know, ferns use spores to reproduce. It appears to me that it is just the Sori under your leaves (the Sori is made up of groups of Sporangium, which produce and contain the spores). Nothing to be worry about! You can even try to grow more from these.


13

I use a lawnmower with a bagger. The blades chop the leaves and reduce the volume by up to 80%. The finely shredded leaves are great mulch for plant or vegetable beds. I cut my grass low in the fall as we get a lot of snow and this reduces the chance of snow mould. You may have to adjust your cutting height depending on the amount of leaves. This ...


13

Leaves are good compost if they are shredded. If left as is on garden beds or lawns they tend to clump and can smother the smaller perennials. To do my fall clean up I put a bagger on the mower and go at it. I can put up to six inches (12 cm) of fluffy shredded leaves on top of rhubarb and by next June or July the worms have eaten it up. They will do the ...


12

These are aphids whose lifestyle is to live off the plant juices in the leaves. They can be found almost everywhere during the growing season and prefer plants with soft leaves. You will rarely find them on plants with hard waxy leaves as the cuticle is too hard to bite through. Control is easy with 5 ml dish soap to 1 litre of water. Agitate and spray ...


12

It looks in your photos as if you have it in a small cup with no drainage. I would surmise from that & the condition of the leaves that it is over-watered and probably suffering from root rot. Replant it into a container with drainage holes with a rich, well draining potting soil. Keep the soil damp but not soggy and give it some time.


11

Looking closely at the last picture, there are clear dark concentric circles around the black spots which is textbook early blight. It is a trademark of the disease. Blight has been bad, really bad this year. Your best chance is unfortunately to pull the plants and save any remaining healthy plants. Then going forward there are some key cultural ...


11

That looks like a squash of some kind. It will probably send out runners and spread quite a bit. The fruit should be edible, but I can't really tell what it will look like. It may be more like a pumpkin (it resembles Cucurbita maxima).


11

Looks like natural variegation to me...looks like a typical golden pothos (Epipremnum aureum). It's supposed to have these marks. They show up and contrast best with good lighting. Don't worry about this - it's natural, and healthy.


11

Nothing to worry about, if you're referring to the semi circular red area on the leaves - these are zonally marked Pelargoniums, and that's what they should look like.


10

That is Early Blight, Alternaria solani. The earlier you treat, the better the control, as a strong infection will build up resistance to the fungicide. Here's what to do: Remove all leaves showing signs of early blight (yellowing, dry margin, large to small round dead spots.) Do not touch the unaffected leaves with the removed portions, or your hands ...


10

The only time you usually remove leaves which are slightly damaged or part dead is if the plant is highly ornamental and it's detracting from its appearance, or the leaf is damaged by some kind of infection or invader. Otherwise, just wait for the leaf to shrivel and fall off naturally, or remove it when it's at that stage.


10

Urtica dioica - Stinging nettles...! Very valuable wilderness food. Truly! If you grab a leaf touching just the topside you can mash it (eliminating the chemicals on the underside of the leaf) roll it in a ball and eat it! We had to do this in Wilderness Survival classes. Interesting. Even better, this stuff is almost exactly like spinach steamed. ...


10

Hope this is what you were looking for. These pictures are all from the site of the Colorado Master Gardener Program. (There's much more extensive information there than I can copy here.) They have more diagrams, and the explanation are very good. You can also print them out: http://www.cmg.colostate.edu/GardenNotesUpdate.shtml This one gives definitions ...


9

No, don't cut this one back,it'll ruin its structure, and anyway, they bleed like crazy if you cut them. The thing to remember about any Ficus is they're fussy - they absolutely hate a change in conditions, and in particular, a draught. Indoors, most will drop leaves when the seasons change, so in spring and again in autumn, and mostly because the heating ...


9

That is magnesium deficiency. It can also cause yellowing between leaf veins. Treat by watering Epsom salts (magnesium sulfate) at a rate of 1 cup per every two gallons, with every watering until the symptoms leave. See a comparison pic:


9

Mint leaves are just fine to use any time, including after the plant has flowered. The flavor may not be quite as strong as it was before it flowered, so you may need to add more leaves to your jelly infusion to get the same taste. Be sure to cut the flowering stems back when you harvest. Cutting the flowering stems back may even encourage your mint to ...


9

This is some species of Acacia. The strap-shaped leaves are actually petioles (the leaf stem) which have expanded and flattened, and do not have an actual leaf blade. This type of flattened petiole is called a phyllode. The only acacia I've ever seen with these two different leaf forms is koa, but several (maybe most?) Australian acacias also behave ...


9

I let the grass grow a little higher than usual for a week or two before the leaves fall, set the mower on the highest setting and mow twice at that setting. This mulches the leaves in place. I do this for subsequent weeks, progressively lowering the blade. By the time I am ready to use the bagger a lot of the material is composted on the lawn; since ...


8

Look on the bottom of the leaves. If you see small rows of tiny white capsules, you have leaf miners. These devastated spinach and chard for our garden. They also infest beet greens but are not a problem unless you eat the tops. Control is to remove infested plants, put screens over the plants to keep the flies from coming onto the plants, and eliminate ...


8

Going off of what Kevin said (I can't make comments yet :). I used to work in a greenhouse for a year in high school. There is another way other than dish soap and water as well as picking them off yourself which I used to do, however it depends on where you plants are. You could release lady bugs as they love eating them. Lady bugs tend to get ridd of them ...


8

Alstonia scholaris (L.) R. Br. is a very beautiful ornamental tree, which is commonly known as pagoda tree because of its pagoda like growing habit. It is commonly infected by the Homopteran, Pauropsylla tuberculata Crawf which leads to unsightly gall formation on the leaves as pictured. The gall is the leaf response to the infection by the parasite which ...


7

I know the answer has already been accepted, but feel the need to add this - piles of leaves are best composted separately from everything else, because they break down in a different way from most other stuff. If you've got room, and plenty of black bags, it's easy - just collect them up, stuff them in the bags, as many as you can in each bag and still be ...


7

I do it every year and always have great vegetable gardens. If the forest does not die from leaves your garden will not. I just till then in several times over the fall and winter then have a great garden in the spring. They will build your garden soil. I collected probably 500 bags this past year (fall 2014) and will do the same this year. They are great ...


7

Leaves that have been chopped (and I am assuming this is what your mower did) can add motility but not necessarily additional fertility to garden soil. This is a good thing depending upon your soil type: humus to make the soil drain better, be a bit looser rather than compacted is good. It was long believed that leaves would raise the pH to the acid side, ...


7

I strongly suspect this is early infection with citrus leaf miner - the moth that causes this is an import from Asia and is now very active in the USA. There is evidence of leaf miner infestation in the second photograph, top leaf, to the left of the dead area in the leaf, which itself is probably where a former leafminer was present. That, coupled with the ...


7

Those are not fruits, but galls caused by an insect laying its eggs inside the leaf tissue. It is probably a tiny wasp. If you carefully dissect one of the galls you will find either an unhatched egg or a larva inside. Usually it is not considered a problem unless there are so many that the plant is disfigured, but spraying with insecticides will not have ...


7

Bacterial leaf spot infection. There is no cure, but you can try to avoid it next season. Here are some tips: Cultural: Clean up and burn/landfill fallen leaves/fruit. Don't compost. Loosen the soil around the base of the plant. Add 1" of rich compost to the soil. Mulch well with an organic mulch to help conserve moisture Water whenever the ground is ...


7

The dark green veins and light green leaf material also indicate an Iron/Manganese deficiency which is very common with citrus grown on alkaline soils. See here for more detail. Repotting with new soil, more light, more drainage and a touch of acid or citrus fertilizer should fix all the symptoms.


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