Hot answers tagged

8

First off, if its grown from seed you may want to consider grafting while its still a manageable size. If it frosts in your area this may be a consideration in getting a suitable graft, in the comments it mentions some mexican varieties that may be more frost resistant. You can always graft individual branches later. Fruit from ungrafted plants (from seed)...


7

Plant it now in a pot with a height and diameter of four to six inches. Avocados are trees so in good conditions you can expect that it will need to be re potted one size larger in a year or two. Avocados exhibit apical dominance so when I have cut mine back they do not sprout multiple leaders but just sit there until one new bud one the side forms. I do ...


7

The mushrooms are simply the fruiting bodies of mycelium present in the compost. To check whether the plant is revivable or not, scrape back a little of the bark or outer covering on the main stem with your fingernail in a few places, particularly towards the lower part of the stem. If beneath is brown and dry, it's dead - if it looks moist and greenish, ...


7

There are a lot of questions about avocado from people with the same issue. Avocado's have strong apical dominance. This plant wants to be a very tall tree. The other factor is that when grown indoors it is rarely receiving the light levels required to put out a lot of leaf growth. When I cut back avocados grown indoors you would get one, maybe two, buds. ...


6

I have seen this same type of damage on an avocado in a pot that was allowed to go dry. Given that your plant is outdoors in a hot and dry area this looks like stress caused by inadequate water. Avocados require a well aerated soil with water that is low in dissolved salts. A soil depth of 1 metre is helpful in maintaining water levels. The ...


6

If they are all dried out then they are dead. Avocado pits need to be planted pretty quickly after being removed from their fruit. On your first success, how did you start the pit? The method I've had the most luck with was suspending the fresh and thoroughly washed pit over a glass of water using toothpicks stuck into the seed in several spots, with ...


6

I think this is a bad idea. Avocados require freely draining soil, and if you're planting inside an IBC, then you're going to need most of a cubic ton of an artificial soil mix. But most of that might be wasted since the tree is shallow rooted and the main feeder roots are in the first 6 inches of soil. Trees can potentially grow 60 feet high, so you're ...


6

Bulrush is correct. Very few plants need to be watered every day. A better technique is to let the top inch of soil dry out and then water thoroughly until water comes out the bottom of the pot. You do have drainage holes in the pot? This damage does not look like fungus/virus/bacteria to me as it lacks the alternating bands of light and dark material ...


6

You can leave it the way it is. Most likely 2 of the shoots will die off as Avocados have strong apical dominance. If this doesnt happen, having multiple shoots won't hurt the tree. (Multiple shoots apparently also indicates is a very good plant)


6

Most avocado plants are hybrids and seeds will not necessarily come true from seed. Fruit could be better, worse or the same. Also, avocados are large trees. Your chances of getting a crop from a plant in a pot grown inside are not very good. If you search for avocado on this forum you will see many very sad looking plants. They do not do well inside in ...


5

I had incredible luck several years ago with an avocado plant at my work. The window I sat next to faced south, and it lived for about 3 years. It was very bush-like, as I consistently pruned it to keep it from getting too tall and lanky. The last time I had counted its leaves, there were over 200! Sadly, one winter, it died as our weather was incredibly ...


5

Plants live in an uneasy balance with fungus, virus and bacteria. Sometimes they coexist, sometimes one attacks the other. The symptoms I see look like a soil borne infection caused by a stress to the plant. One possible cause for this is overwatering. Underwatering tends to produce large areas of dead tissue in the leaves which I don't see here. If you ...


5

Yes, you can. When the plant has its seasonal high starch reserves, it likely can be 'chopped with abandon' (so to speak). This would be when new leaves are just starting to emerge. Even then it is a good practice to cut back retaining one or two leaves to branch. I suggest you cut back to one or two leafs. This bit of foliage will assure that there is ...


4

It should be noted that the bumpy skinned haas avocados only come from clones of the original tree. Avocados grown from seed will be the normal smooth skinned avocado which does not have the high flavor of the haas.


4

Trim the roots, yes. This will encourage a denser root system. Trim the stem? I can't see why. An avocado is a tree and no amount of trimming on the stem will make it grow like a bush. Avocado's exhibit apical dominance although not to the same degree as an evergreen. One stem will be more dominant and grow more than the others. See these other questions ...


4

I agree with Graham that this is not likely to produce the results you want if you use regular Avocado stock. There is a dwarf avocado called the Wurtz which will successfully crop when grown in a container. It gets about 3M (10') tall. Issues will be your temperatures which are right on the edge of what it will tolerate ( -3 Deg C or 25 Deg F). ...


4

(Posting because no one else did, and a partial answer is probably better then no answer) Avocados do have tap roots, but they do not go down very deep at all, so much so I'd hardly even call them tap roots. (Source - I dug up a couple of smallish avocado plants yesterday). I'm still dubious, but the person who's plants I dug up recons they just dig up ...


4

Avocados are a subtropical species that like high humidity and a climate without even mild frost. They prefer deep, well drained soil that has a pH around 6.2 (slightly acidic). Since they don't like any temperature below freezing, growing them indoors is probably best during winter in your zone. Once you are sure no freezing will occur you can move them ...


4

I'm not an expert with Avocados yet, but when my goats did something similar to one of my avocados about 6 months ago, new leaves did arrive on the scene, but the avo has still not grown back - it was about 60cm high, its now still 15 cm's high - but has a lot of leaves. It is possible that part of the reason is that I pruned it back a few times before (not ...


4

Here's the link to the grower of your avocado Waimea Nursery- Reed is the variety - there are 500 varieties. Are you in the South Island or North? Most production is Bay of Plenty, but with shelter, good drainage and deep soil, and only light frosts you may get fruit as far south as Nelson.


4

Your avocado looks fairly healthy...good soil, color is a bit on the light green side and curling down could be due to time of day or temperature. The big question is fertilizer. Have you used a balanced fertilizer? N P K plus micro nutrients? How old is your plant? Sure looks like it is lacking in chemicals for photosynthesis. Fertilizer. Let us ...


4

It's nothing to worry about, though you may not like the way it looks. Terracotta pots allow moisture to permeate their clay, and minerals from the soil and water end up depositing on the outside of the pot, usually looking white, like yours. You can try scrubbing it off with a brush and cloth if you don't like it, and then switch to watering with distilled ...


3

No, don't do that; that's something you might do as a temporary thing at the onset of winter in cold areas, to protect the roots, but not piling it up against the trunk of the tree. Knowing where you are would be very useful, but generally, avocado trees, though not fussy about soil ph, do require free draining soil, they do not like having 'wet feet'. At ...


3

There are a lot of people who like to grow avocado. You are fortunate that you can grow yours outside year round. repot with a pot one size larger the leaves are drooping in response to reduced sunlight. Outside the light comes from above and leaves are held parallel to the ground. Inside more light comes from all levels and the leaves respond by changing ...


3

Avocados need a lot of water. The soil the tree is in should always be moist, not damp but it should always be moist. Are you letting the tree try to fruit? During draught it may be a good idea to nip the buds before it tries to put water in the fruit. If more drastic measures are required and if you really cannot water (and you need a lot of water to feed ...


3

Scale insect attack can be a symptom of weaker than normal plant cells, such as produced by overfertilizing with nitrogen. So a longer term solution in this case is to reduce nitrogen fertilizer and/or add some potash to help grow stronger plant cells. Ants help to spread the scale on the plant by protecting them from potential insect predators. The ants do ...


3

Use 2-3 parts pumice to 1 part fast draining potting soil. If you want them to grow fast and well, the soil should be nearly dry in 2 days or less, less is better. I have not tried straight pumice but it should work well as long as you give it the correct nutrient mix.


3

By pruning the main stem back, you force the plant to back bud, or grow a greater amount of smaller leaves. This is how you achieve that "bushy" appearance that you want. Back budding also allows the plant to gain more sunlight without becoming tall and "lanky" or rather unattractive. The pot should be just big enough for the root ball to fit loosely. An ...


3

It can be several things. I have to look at the back of the leaves to know for sure. My guess is: Spider mites if there are red dots Thrips or whiteflies if there are white dots on the back It can be sun burn from misting if the back looks the same


3

This plant is well established and will do everything it needs without any assistance. I agree the leaves look dead but you should wait until you see new growth before removing the old leaves. There is no need to cut back the stem. It is storing energy. Avocados are trees with strong apical dominance (they grow one "leader" trunk). The existing trunk ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible