16

Those look like Birch Polypore, scientific name Piptoporus betulinus. This mushroom is global but found almost exclusively on birch trees. The polypore is called "saprobic," which means it feeds on parts of the tree which are already dead or decaying, so most likely that crack was there first. Now that the tree is infested, though, unfortunately it's likely ...


16

They're a perfectly natural part of nature's disposal/decomposition system - they break down dead wood. If they didn't, that dead wood would take forever to decompose, so if you have woody roots or even a stump left behind, fungal activity is an obvious consequence. The fact you've watered the area assists the fungal process and will aid faster breakdown of ...


13

Definitively a mushroom, a cup fungus of the pezizaceae family. (Precise identification is difficult over the internet.) What you see are the fruiting bodies - not unlike the apples on a tree. The fungus itself lives in the mulch / soil and is saprobiontic, which means it digests the wood chips of your mulch. This is perfectly normal and part of the ...


12

No, it's not going to make your radishes inedible, toxic or taste funny. I agree they look like Coprinus of some variety, and Coprinus are edible, though I wouldn't recommend eating them without a definite ID. Regarding the radishes you're growing, bear in mind that, although you can see the mushrooms right now, they are only the fruiting body of underground ...


11

It's one of the stinkhorns, and yes it does look like a phallus. Surprised you haven't mentioned the stench yet, but you may notice it shortly, especially if more arrive. Its Latin name is Mutinus elegans; they don't last long, but you may find more appearing associated with the mulch. It's not toxic, though not edible, should disappear fairly quickly, but ...


11

Those are fine-looking mushrooms! The key for mushrooms "like from the store" (in Germany) is to harvest when they are not yet fully mature. This means that the velum, the thin skin at the underside of the cap, is still closed. A mature mushroom will have a flatter cap with exposed gills, ready to release the spores. And mushrooms mature quickly once they ...


10

Firstly let me say that mushroom identification is a precise art and that many fungi require a whole host of things to identify them 100%, sometimes including microscopes. Therefore take my identification with a pinch of salt. I'm pretty sure mushroom #2 is a snowy ink cap (coprinopsis nivea/niveus), which is known for its preference of growing on manure. ...


10

Too much water, most likely, for one thing, could be combined with poor drainage depending on the details of the pot and soil mix. Probably some other things [planting depth?] to not get any tomato seedlings (I gather that you "planted tomatoes" [fruit] rather than transplanting tomato plants) such as excessively cool temperatures or not noticing the ...


8

Yes. Probably it is some Armillaria, but maybe other species. Fungi likes dead wood (and dead roots) as nutrient to grow. Fungi cannot produce own food (evolutionary, they are more related to animals than vegetables), so they need to find nutrients. You should remove them, and in a few years they should reduce, until they will find no more root. Next time, ...


7

I don't know which fungus it is, but there are bracket fungii which exude amber coloured droplets (Shaggy Bracket, Oak Bracket fungus) although this one doesn't look like either of those. Trees, when they're infected, can also produce amber coloured droplets - sometimes they stink because its a bacterial infection, sometimes there's no smell at all, so it ...


7

I'll confirm that the identification of Peziza fungus is accurate in Stephie's answer, and it is a saphrophytic fungus, meaning it merely digests dead material, link below (if you scroll down) shows one or two which are more like yours to look at. These are commonly known as cup fungi. Now that it's present, even if you replace your bark chips with new, it's ...


7

While I don't know anything about those particular mushrooms, I'm confident that they're not a problem. In fact, they might be a sign of beneficial microbes (maybe not). However, your soil looks pretty wet. A lot of people think overwatering contributes to root rot. Infected soil, low light, no ventilation and such are also factors. Pythium, one of the ...


7

Yes, Bamboo, I agree. Here are a couple pictures of the "elegant stinkhorn", Mutinus elegans: from Wikipedia, and from http://www.mushroomexpert.com/mutinus_elegans.html Amazing isn't it?


7

Please forget that idea immediately. (Unless you want to slowly kill your trees, have them become unstable, brittle and generally dangerous, of course.) There are two types of mushrooms that grow on trees. The non-parasitic ones that consume already dead plant material. If they grow on a tree, it was already damaged at this spot and the mushrooms are just ...


6

Your plan will stop the mushrooms from growing through, yes. Especially if you have gravel/dust between the flagstones, above the geotextile fabric. Sounds like a plan. But one thought. The stump will still decompose, and as it does, shrink in size, and leave a very uneven surface eventually. The bigger the tree, the worse. On large trees, there will also ...


6

Removing the fruiting bodies will not slow the damage/decay to the host tree. They do not affect the rate of the mycelium growth within the tree, and, if anything, removing the fruiting bodies will divert energy to new mycelium growth. They are only present for one purpose: spreading the fungus around. Usually, in a case that bad, you will remove the tree. ...


6

If you take the fruiting body (mushroom) off, you'll leave behind the mycelium ("roots") which are busily turning your wood mulch into finer mulch. Ask yourself if you have a moisture problem in that area, and if so, attempt to fix it. If it's been raining a lot, just pull the mushroom and keep an eye on the area for a few weeks. You may just have a ...


6

I'd like to know the source of the soil in your pot - the likeliest explanation is that the tomato seeds did not germinate at all, but there was mycelium in the soil, and that's what's grown. Mycelium are present throughout soil and mushrooms or toadstools are the fruiting bodies it produces at various times. If you used garden soil, this is the most likely ...


6

It's a member of the order Agaricales. Which contains many edible mushrooms such as the white mushrooms you buy in the store as well as very poisonous mushrooms such as the European destroying angel. Agaricales apart from chanterelles are often hard to identify and easy to confuse. Touching a poisonous mushroom is not dangerous. However when dealing with ...


6

How do I know when to harvest a champignon? You can harvest it once it has formed a cap. When small it's called a button mushroom, and at its largest size it's called a portobello mushroom. If the ends of the mushroom are curling upwards, it's a little late. When I harvest, should I cut the stem or just rip/screw it out? Twist them out. They suggest ...


5

This looks like typical wooden-linked mushroom. They come here to feed on the wood you put to feed your earth and this is a good thing: It shows that life is working around your plants in your garden. They won't be a problem to your young plants because they feed on something different, and even better, they enrich the soil for them! The mushrooms will ...


5

In the context of mushrooms, saprotrophic just means that the fungus uses already dead or dying plant material for sustenance. This is in contrast to parasitic fungi, which will actually hasten the death of their host plants; for example ganoderma zonatum, or reishi mushroom. Your trees and landscaping are not really threatened by saprotrophic fungi ...


5

They certainly do look like Oyster's. Without seeing the stem it's hard to know for sure. A white spore print is also a good indication. I've seen many Oyster's that split off like that as well. I did find one forum that addresses whether or not they can grow on Yukka. It seems that the major consensus is yes. https://www.shroomery.org/forums/showflat.php/...


5

It's nothing to worry about. Most potting mediums these days have a high proportion of composted materials within them. Sometimes the composting process is incomplete, but either way, fungal mycorrhizae are present in the soil, and yours are happy enough to produce a fruiting body or two - the mushrooms you're seeing. Just pick them off and bin them if you ...


5

A common cause of mushrooms appearing is cutting down a tree. The roots start to decay and provide an invisible underground food for the hyphae. Sod growers might also incorporate peat moss or other woody material in the soil for sod which can provide a home for mushrooms. Mushroom spores are wind borne and cannot be controlled. You cannot get rid of them ...


5

Hmm, I think a little explanation about mushrooms and how they function is necessary. When you see mushrooms or toadstools, those are only the fruiting bodies of an extensive underground root system called mycelium. The reason you're getting them in that area is because you have dead wood in the ground (your tree stump and its woody roots) and in fact, the ...


5

I know you've accepted the answer already, but I'll add this extra information anyway. They look like Coprinus of some variety, and they're not a problem at all. If you want to reduce their spread, twist off the caps and stalks as they appear with a plastic bag over your hand - some mushrooms disperse spores from the gills beneath the cap. However, the ...


5

Not sure which varieties of mushroom they are, but even if they are poisonous, that's only the case if you decide to throw them in a casserole or fry 'em up for breakast, so just don't eat them. The mushrooms are just the fruiting bodies of underground mycelium, so getting rid of them for once and all isn't possible, but they will disappear on their own ...


5

It's Parasola plicatilis, previously known as Coprinus, common name pleated inkcap. These are delicate mushrooms with a short lifespan of 24-72 hours - nothing much to worry about, they are saprobic, a decomposer mushroom usually found in grassy areas or sometimes forest edges, but there is some suggestion they might possibly have psychoactive properties. ...


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