3

Given the size of the bulb, the position of the bulb in the pot (even with/above the soil level), the fact that two flowering stems came from the same bulb, and time of year (I'm assuming that the plant is in the Northern Hemisphere), I'd say that's an amaryllis (a cultivar in either the Hippeastrum or Amaryllis genera). If I were a betting man, I'd bet on ...


3

Top insects are thrips: https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=876 and will be causing some damage, other insect is a psocid https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psocoptera and should not be a problem for the plant.


2

I have one Cyclamen persicum which goes naturally into dormancy and three which refuse to stop blooming. I hesitate to force a happily blooming plant to quit. They are all producing new leaves and abundant flowers. These plants were sold at a Big Box store as hardy, but they are not, although a friend has has success planting them in a warm sheltered ...


2

This is a sign of over watering and early root rot let the plant dry out for two weeks. Also remove the squishy leaves and if possible put it in a new pot. The pot you have it in is holding too much water. If you want a good succulent pot get something with plenty of drainage. After 1 week of watering the pot should be bone dry. Forget about it for another ...


2

It is not easily done. The thistles I see usually grow in full sun which can be about 120,000 lux outside at noon. Inside illumination ranges from 100 to 500 lux, a vast difference in the light levels needed for growth and flowering. You would need to supplement the light levels with an artificial light system of some sort. High pressure sodium or metal ...


2

It appears to be Dracaena Marginata. Here is a pretty good web page describing care. Highlights from the article: Make sure container is well-drained. Use a potting soil with a loamy soil (a mixture of silt, sand, and clay), along with some peat. Like all Dracaenas, the marginata flourishes in a humid atmosphere. Mist the leaves occasionally, and keep the ...


1

That’s a beautiful plant! It looks like a very healthy pothos vine. Luckily, it’s a very hearty plant, and easy to care for. This is a great article about pothos care, but I’ll sum up some of the points here: Pothos like bright, indirect light, but they tolerate almost any type of light. They popular vines in offices and other low light areas. Some types of ...


1

Your rubber tree has signs of root rot. The soil is too damp for too long, which is either caused by too frequent watering (overwatering) or poor drainage in the soil (or the combination of both). To get back to a healthy situation I suggest you stop watering for a while, until you are sure the soil is completely dry. If you say you water it every 2 weeks, ...


1

Manganese deficiency – If new fronds are yellow or display yellow splotches, the tree may be lacking manganese. This often occurs when the tree is planted in manganese-poor soil, which is common in tropical climates. This deficiency is easily treated by applying manganese sulfate (not magnesium sulfate, which is completely different). Read more at Gardening ...


1

I have mine with the same spots. My ZZ looks pretty healthy. Once a month I take all the dust from on top the leaves. I water occasionally. But I check the soil 3 X a week. I love mine. So, I really recommend to you, put set in your calendar, once a week to check your ZZ. You will never forget to water. Also, I talk with mine, I kiss some leaves, in my home ...


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