4

Based on the dotty leaves, the flower and the growth structure it is most probably a Begonia. I am not sure what species but it looks like a Begonia maculata "Madagascar" to me.


4

Based on the big brown bulb and the stem I think it is a Stephania erecta. The baby leaves could look similar: Stephania erecta Plant Care 4: Leaves!. Mature leaves will be more round but they still have a pointy part.


3

Just cut it - the plant will learn that's not where roots should go and it'll stop.


3

Overwatering can do long-term damage to rubber plant foliage (even just one overwatering). I have a non-variegated rubber plant that was droopy and not as vibrant as it could be; it looked a lot like yours, sans the variegation. The solution to the coloring problem and lack of growth seemed to be to give it a houseplant dose of 24-8-16 All-purpose Miracle ...


2

I've always heard and used "saucer", which probably came from the practice of using actual old glass/china saucers under plants. Gardeners tend to be a thrifty lot and have been following the "reuse/recycle" ethos for decades, if not forever. Personally, I've used old saucers, pie tins, layer cake pans, square cake pans, and many other ...


1

As mentioned, you could just cut it but while it is still short I usually try to guide it back inside the pot. Other option is that you could just leave it, although it has a higher risk of rotting and that could spread inside. If there is enough room and air under the pot it could be fine though.


1

Its likely the sun exposure - these are tiny seedlings, not small plants at this stage, and they are not strong enough to tolerate sunlight. It would have been best to pot them up individually in small pots until they did develop into bushy, small plants at least six inches tall, with a well formed root system, and then transfer them to this large pot, if ...


1

This is a fungus/virus/bacteria that has taken advantage of wet conditions in the root ball to move upstairs, so to speak. Typical signs are starts with old growth typical end state is a circle of dead tissue surrounded by an area of dying yellow tissue sometimes you will see growth "rings" as the fungus/virus/bacteria grows out from the initial ...


1

Try googling 'plant pot drip trays' as well, you're more likely to be shown a range of trays suitable for plants rather than china in the kitchen... If you want a decorative outer pot to stand a plant pot in, that's usually called a cache pot. Most of these don't have drainage holes, though some may have a hole with a matching saucer or tray beneath.


1

It likely is Xiphidium caeruleum, called Cola de paloma in English.


1

The insect pictured is not a thrip because it doesn't seem to have wings, though I can't otherwise identify it. Since you found it under a pot, its likely to be an insect that prefers damp conditions, which is why it was under there.


1

The only thing that could save some plants from last winters record low temperatures along the TX coast would be to bring them inside. As of the end of July some stuff has come back, some didn't. I am hoping some of a large fig tree made it. 75% was dead, but half of what leafed out has now died. One sego palm of 20 has still not come back. It was so cold ...


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