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I agree, it looks like a leggy Kalanchoe blossfeldiana. Most people throw them out when the blooms fade after purchase,but if you want to keep it, cut it right back ('d take it down to half an inch on any thick and leggy stems) repot into new potting soil if it needs it, or give it a feed with a houseplant fertilizer and stand it in a bright daylight ...


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I suggest just leaving it alone. These plants bud out quite readily from old growth but usually need good light to power the new buds. If you wait till spring there will be more light. By spring you will also be able to evaluate how much of that stem has died back. When it buds out you can cut it back to just above the new buds.


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Yes, direct sun can be acceptable for a couple of hours and given winter you will get only a couple of hours even in a South facing window. I have kept multiple Monstera and Philodendron in a South facing window since December and I did not experienced any burning. When it was exceptionally sunny I closed the curtains to provide some filtering. I live in ...


1

They are known as Fungus gnats in English. There are many tips and tricks, but like you have already noticed none of them are bullet proof. Here an example of a recent post with the same question. My own experience is that these gnats always come back, but you can keep them under control a bit. The nematode treatment, like you tried already, works very good ...


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You see this quite often on aglaonema and aroids. I have seen it more often on plants in good light and think it is guttation which is the exudation of drops of xylem sap on the tips or edges of leaves Your diagnostic keys would be to rule out other sources of sticky sap such as scale. Check the underside of the leaves and the base of the stems for small ...


1

One of the favourite things for people in garden centres to do is keep the place tidy by picking up random plant labels from the floor and sticking them in random pots that need a label. I think this one is an Episcia, but which species is a puzzle. Note that the plant is hairy; all Episcias are hairy and have the silver veining. E. lilacina leaves ...


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Actually there does not seem anything wrong with the basil plant apart from old age. Time to replace it with a younger seedling and allow that to continue to provide leaves. Longer version: there are at least 3 different plants known as "albahaca" in Spanish and Portuguese and Caribbean areas; this one we can see from the crumply leaves and light ...


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Yes, your mint has probably had a bit too much water. Also it has filled its pot and therefore exhausted all the resources there. It is time to move it to a new pot by taking a piece of a root from the existing plant and planting in new soil. If you take your plant out of the pot and break open the root ball you will find many very thin roots and a few very ...


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I would not put it in water; I suggest you get some new potting soil asap, a pot with drainage holes that is big enough to house what roots there are on the bottom of the one stem that appears to still have life in it without cramping or bending the roots, and pot it up properly, making sure the roots are all buried properly, and planting it no deeper than ...


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This plant has presumably been "forced" probably with the intention of making it flower for Christmas or Valentine's Day, though apparently that didn't quite work out as planned! In fact miniature roses are generally tougher plants than the larger varieties. The are quite happy with outdoor winter temperatures down to -20F (-30C). They prefer ...


1

When I was dealing with these plants on a regular basis they were called Dracaena demerensis cultivar Janet Craig. Botanists have been busy and this is now classified as Dracaena massangea. This plant is native to tropical Africa and will not stand below zero temperatures. The leaves are dead and should be removed. The stems and roots may be dead but it's ...


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This plant is an example of Schefflera actinophlla or the Umbrella tree. As you have had it for a while it is probably the species rather than a cultivar like Amate which has darker green leaves. It is native to Australia, New guinea and Java and can grow up to 50' (15m) tall. Indoors it has no problems reaching 10' (3m) tall. In Florida and Hawaii it is ...


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Unfortunately, that looks too late, sorry. I don't have a good history with Peace lily too. They reaction to stress is so bad. and the only medium I managed to keep them alive (after a stress such as dried or rotten roots) was water. Your Peace lily has almost no foliage so it has a serious problem with the photosynthesis. And two years + three month without ...


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I decided to answer this question myself, because I have this plant for already several months, and it's doing well. It turned out that water forget-me-not doesn't really need to grow in water. I've been keeping it in a clay pot and watering it regularly to keep the soil moist, so basically just treating it like any other plant that likes water. So far it ...


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