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Most probably, but the plant might go into a shock, could lose some leaves, or the remaining roots could even rot. On the other hand it could be just alright. It highly depends on the genus/type of the plant as well. A Golden Pothos most probably would not even notice but there are more sensitive plants (from roots perspective) like Peperomia or Hoya that do ...


1

The stem-facing part is rotten. You can try to slice it off cleanly higher up and put the moist bit into soil, but there's no guarantees that it'll grow. If you want to use the gel, cut it off where the leaf is fully healthy. Then slice it in half and scoop out the clear gel. It's great for the skin, and helps heal burns.


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Standard cut worm damage. Aluminum foil wrapped around the stem ( a collar) will protect the plants. Not easy to get the worms with insecticide as they live in the soil and occasionally come out to eat stems. BT should get them, except they may destroy a plant before the BT kills them. I would use BT anyway with collars.


1

I too suspect it's a Ficus. However, Ficus are known for their vigorous root system. It may develop quickly in one season and clog the drainage hole. The end result is waterlogging which may appear as overwatering. That is not the only factor to inspect. The soil looks too fine, something akin to loam or silt. As said, you will have to check the root system ...


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