3

It looks like Calathea lancifolia (rattlesnake plant) to me. When I propagated one, I did it by separation — taking it out of the pot and splitting it into multiple plants. New leaves come up from the roots, so the plant is easily divided this way. Good luck!


3

Sansevieria francisii ‘Ouch’ Spiky Mother in Laws Tongue


2

I have been lazily looking after a cyclamen in a similar situation for 20 years. If the leaves become very mouldy, or it gets a big mite infestation then dry it out and remove dead foilage, otherwise enjoy.


2

Looks like a scale problem, so removing the plant outdoors while you try to deal with it was a good idea. You need to clean the leaves with a soapy (insecticidal soap) cloth to remove as many scales as possible - the brown hard lumps need to come off, along with any white fluffy bits (the crawlers). Then apply or spray an insecticidal soap solution, or use ...


2

It's hard to know from the information provided. Some details say it could be, but there are other plants that might qualify as well. Consider this picture for example, that of a woody vine (Cissus hypoglauca) in Australia and there may well be others with palmate 5 leaflets. Arguments no: normally by this size Brassaia actinophylla (Schefflera) has started ...


1

Yes, plants produce, just like yourself, CO2 when they burn sugars for energy. However, CO2 is not toxic, especially not in concentrations found in your house or outside. It is completely natural to produce CO2, even bacteria do it. No worries about it. There are discussions going on about CO2 functioning as a greenhouse gas, or even that it might be ...


1

Espostoa species are mostly covered in greyish coloured hairs, except for one of two species when they are very young. Whatever it is, it looks like a desert cactus, so it will do fine with as much direct sun as possible and free draining compost. Whatever that brown stuff is (some sort of moss?) get rid of it! Make sure the pot has drain holes, so it won'...


1

I'm afraid cutting off the top from where it leans over will not solve the problem, because the problem is insufficient light - you will notice that the plant has the appearance of stretching and leaning over to get as close to daylight as possible. You could try moving it to a brighter spot, directly in front of a window and as close as possible, with the ...


1

Moonstones a species of Pachyphtum. Also known as Sugaralmond plant. The meaning of the name Pachyphytum oviferum is thick plant bearing eggs. The stems (20 cm long, 1 cm thick) rise then fall with about 15 leaves. These leaves are 3 to 5 cm long, 1.8 to 3 cm wide and 8 to 17 mm thick. Leaves are pale blue-green to bluish-purple, looking like a sugared ...


1

It looks like a Pachyphytum and less likely an Echeveria (Members of the Crassulaceae family), but possibly this is a hybrid. I don't think it may have such a long stem, possibly too little light. A jade plant (Crassula Ovata) has a different stem and leaves. The one in the middle appears to have a basal stem rot. That's why it looks "burnt". Cut it above ...


1

I think it is a member of the Crassula family (genus). The most popular member of this family is the Jade plant (Crassula ovata), but I am not sure if you have the same species here. Your plants seems to have a more lighter green than the Jade plant. Succulents like Crassula, don't need a lot of water. The soil can dry out between waterings, let's say give ...


1

The experiment was a failure in the end, though perhaps a promising one. Two out of three survived the winter, but then died in the spring. I think this was mainly because having been rather dormant and not needing much water they suddenly got going again just before I went away for a week, and dried out. I may try again at some point, though this year's ...


1

Could be a Swamp Rose Mallow, a species of Hibiscus. Do the flowers start of light in the morning and darken in colour by noon?


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible