3

It's not really a good idea - the cactus needs fast draining soil mix, and water is very much reduced or even suspended in winter during dormancy. They also need a position with some evening or morning sunlight. The Dracaena marginata needs watering year round, and just needs ordinary potting soil, as well as medium or bright light conditions, but without ...


3

Rubber plants (Ficus elastica) can be hard pruned and can respond well. In the wild they are trees, so they can certainly get bigger if you want. Just bear in mind that that pot is not very big for the size of plant, so pruning may buy you time before you need to repot. Cuts 1 and 2 look about right - it will look better if you can just above a branch and ...


3

Really looks like a Cymbidium orchid, one of the hardy species perhaps. The roots in loose clothing matches, and the pseudobulbs of the dead stems.


3

I'd like to know more about where you bought this Jasmine - if it was indoors in the houseplant section of a garden centre or a supermarket, then it's likely Jasminum polyanthemum, which is not fully hardy outdoors in the UK and is sold as a temporary, flowering houseplant whilst it is actually in bloom. Other,similar Jasmines are intended to be planted ...


2

In the winter, I water my spider plant maybe once a month. It's in a cool location (60 degrees F, so something like 17-18C) with only diffuse light, and has a ton of little spiders hanging from it. Generally, half of the spiders die each winter, which is expected behaviour. Right now, it's even blooming. I suspect that you're watering it WAY too much. Mine ...


2

It may well be underwatering or root rot from being too wet causing this, but does the pot it's in have drainage holes in the bottom, or have you planted it straight into a ceramic planter without holes? To check if its root rot, gently tug the affected leaf upwards - if it separates from the base of the plant easily, it's likely the roots are rotting - this ...


2

The seedlings are showing the difference between Epigeal germination, where the cotyledon(s) are pushed above ground and protect the developing leaves, and Hypogeal where they remain below ground. There are plant families where different species show different behaviour, including the Araucariaceae which are southern-hemisphere conifers and also lilies and ...


2

Fig trees of all kinds except the really tall ones prefer bright but indirect light. Since your Starlight is variegated it will grow better in really good light since it shows less green to the light than other fully green types. Put it out on the deck in a protected spot on bright, warm cloudy days but hide it from direct sun. For soil you want something ...


1

It's probably nothing to worry about, no pest, no disease, just a mechanical bend or twist or bump. Keep in mind that when the growing tip is young the tissues are very fragile, wrapped in a tight bundle. Any bump or knock could fracture the leaf, and since the cells are so young they will dry out at the edge, causing odd shapes and marks. Provided there is ...


1

I can see what might be black insects on some of the stems, but can't see them clearly. I can also see some white, oblong objects or marks on top of a leaf about halfway down on the left hand side of the second photo - again, its not possible to see them clearly. These might just be aphids (blackfly) in which case it's worth spraying with an insecticide ...


1

A closely related Ficus Benjamina I had many years ago, had the same problem: Bottom leaves falling off. One thing which stood-out when I attempted to repot it, is being rootbound. After a while, the roots are too big to keep spreading, and will start turning around the edges of the pot. Given that (from your description) it did not start immediately to ...


1

Not without providing additional nutrients. Vermiculite is inert and contains negligible amounts of nutrients, and your plants would quickly show signs of nutrient deficiencies if provided with water alone. However, as a substrate in a hydroponics system where a nutrient solution is used, it can perform well although other substrates are more commonly used ...


1

It's desperate for more root room, even though the topgrowth does not look too bad - repot asap, as previously suggested in the Q & A you link to. UPDATE: Use a pot one size larger than its current one, although two sizes larger won't do much harm; remove the plant from its current pot and settle into the new pot, filling in with potting soil. As for ...


1

It is a palm, my guess is Rhapis excelsa, since it is a common indoor palm (house plant) which looks very similar and has hairy seed pods as well. Here an example of how the seeds look like. Here are some pictures of these plants in the same life phase, I am not the seller, I just found them on google. Be sure that the pot has good drainage, and remove ...


1

Is it an older leaf? Plants loose old leaves all the time. That should be expected. I'm not sure where you are located, but indoors full shade is equal to dense shade outdoors. Your plant can get some direct light indoors. This plant would benefit from morning sun. Outdoors in hot climates it should be in light shade, but not dense. If you are ...


1

it sounds like too much water while it was dormant. to find out if its too much water you need to check the roots for root rot. spider plants need intervals between watering times and in winter it should be around 3 weeks depending on humidity and temperatures this plant should be slightly root bound before repotting. the roots hold large amounts of ...


1

Chlorophytum has very thick, fleshy roots where it stores water to supply to the leaves. The problem is that as the plant ages and the roots accumulate, they start to push the soil out of the pot. Watering wets the roots, but flushes more and more soil out of the pot until there is hardly any soil left - the pot is mostly full of roots. At this point ...


1

Change one of the following, --- give it more light. It looks pale from lack of light. Plants that are getting the right amount of light stand up taller. --- The roots are not getting enough oxygen. -The soil is either too dense or -the plant is root bound. If the soil is too dense them take it out of the pot, wash off the roots add drainage to the soil ...


1

The Plant is a Jade Plant (Crassula ovata)... with Sphagnum moss growing below it... generally Jade Plants want to be fairly dry, and Sphagnum moss grows in bogs... I think you are probably overwatering it... as for the white stuff on the moss... probably fungal... could also be some sort of arthropod pest though (can't see in the photo.)


1

Actually that is Tree Philodendron (Philodendron bipinnatifidum) (AKA Philodendron Selloum) If grown outdoors it prefers morning sun with dappled shade the remainder of the day or dappled shade the entire day. If the temperatures drop below 15°C (60°F), it should be brought inside in winter. Inside in winter, it should be given a bright window with as ...


1

You can keep it in water long term, but only the roots the stem should be kept dry. What you have is a very very basic hydroponic set-up. You will need to change the water often to keep fresh water that is full of oxygen. You will want to use a heat mat to keep the temp of the water around 20°c (70°f). You do not want the water to get too hot, because ...


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