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This is a result of over watering. The roots cannot get enough oxygen so the stem is dying. Here is a quick check to diagnose this: touch the stems where the dying leaves are. Are they soft and can be squeezed with very little force? If that is the case the roots are gone, the stem is dead and the leaves are just getting the news now. Reduce the frequency ...


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Manganese deficiency – If new fronds are yellow or display yellow splotches, the tree may be lacking manganese. This often occurs when the tree is planted in manganese-poor soil, which is common in tropical climates. This deficiency is easily treated by applying manganese sulfate (not magnesium sulfate, which is completely different). Read more at Gardening ...


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Many of the dracaena used as house plants have a problem with fluoridated water and virus/fungus/bacteria can show up when they are over watered. See here for more details. What I see in your pictures that is described in the link is "reddish to tan spots with wide, yellow halos" - described as Fusarium Leaf Spot most of the tips have been trimmed ...


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This is a sign of over watering and early root rot let the plant dry out for two weeks. Also remove the squishy leaves and if possible put it in a new pot. The pot you have it in is holding too much water. If you want a good succulent pot get something with plenty of drainage. After 1 week of watering the pot should be bone dry. Forget about it for another ...


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I've sprouted Mary thistle indoors before, in my kitchen's south windowsill, but only to transplant it outside after it got to a few inches tall. That works fine. However, my observation and guess is you would probably want growlights to get a good, healthy plant with flowers. If you're just growing it for microgreens or something, then growing indoors is ...


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I think it's mildew! My citronella gets the same, especially when I stopped pruning it for a bit.


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It is not easily done. The thistles I see usually grow in full sun which can be about 120,000 lux outside at noon. Inside illumination ranges from 100 to 500 lux, a vast difference in the light levels needed for growth and flowering. You would need to supplement the light levels with an artificial light system of some sort. High pressure sodium or metal ...


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It appears to be Dracaena Marginata. Here is a pretty good web page describing care. Highlights from the article: Make sure container is well-drained. Use a potting soil with a loamy soil (a mixture of silt, sand, and clay), along with some peat. Like all Dracaenas, the marginata flourishes in a humid atmosphere. Mist the leaves occasionally, and keep the ...


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The plant is struggling to reach out for enough sunlight, that is why it looks elongated. The best thing you can do is to place it in a bright area but indirect sunlight.


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There are various kinds of avocado trees. The South American varieties are very dwarf trees. The Tropical African avocado tree can grow quite tall trees. One thing that struck me on your pic is that there is no way the avocado tree does not wither in this small pot. You need a much bigger pot for the tree to grow.


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Oh yes, someone is hungry here. As a first step I recommend you get some generic plant fertilizer, ideally a liquid one for now and start fertilizing as prescribed on the container. You should see a significant improvement within just a few weeks. I suggest liquid because it’s easier to apply and somewhat quicker than the slower-release granules. You can of ...


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That’s a beautiful plant! It looks like a very healthy pothos vine. Luckily, it’s a very hearty plant, and easy to care for. This is a great article about pothos care, but I’ll sum up some of the points here: Pothos like bright, indirect light, but they tolerate almost any type of light. They popular vines in offices and other low light areas. Some types of ...


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Top insects are thrips: https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=876 and will be causing some damage, other insect is a psocid https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psocoptera and should not be a problem for the plant.


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I have mine with the same spots. My ZZ looks pretty healthy. Once a month I take all the dust from on top the leaves. I water occasionally. But I check the soil 3 X a week. I love mine. So, I really recommend to you, put set in your calendar, once a week to check your ZZ. You will never forget to water. Also, I talk with mine, I kiss some leaves, in my home ...


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Your rubber tree has signs of root rot. The soil is too damp for too long, which is either caused by too frequent watering (overwatering) or poor drainage in the soil (or the combination of both). To get back to a healthy situation I suggest you stop watering for a while, until you are sure the soil is completely dry. If you say you water it every 2 weeks, ...


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I have one Cyclamen persicum which goes naturally into dormancy and three which refuse to stop blooming. I hesitate to force a happily blooming plant to quit. They are all producing new leaves and abundant flowers. These plants were sold at a Big Box store as hardy, but they are not, although a friend has has success planting them in a warm sheltered ...


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Amaryllis or hippeastrum ?, after reading Wikipedia I don't know any more. The difference may be when it bloomed , Amaryllis blooms in winter in northern hemisphere ; IF it has had months ( 4 +) of dry dormancy. I think I have very large hippeastrum in the ground that bloom May/June (US zone 8) . Natural dormancy works fine. The blooms are similar to ...


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Given the size of the bulb, the position of the bulb in the pot (even with/above the soil level), the fact that two flowering stems came from the same bulb, and time of year (I'm assuming that the plant is in the Northern Hemisphere), I'd say that's an amaryllis (a cultivar in either the Hippeastrum or Amaryllis genera). If I were a betting man, I'd bet on ...


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