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Well, your plant looks as if it is struggling against something, and all you can do is experiment to find out what that factor is. You have done all the right things and now need to just hold on and hope for the best. At the very least you are gaining experience. The pot has lots of soil but the plant is a bit small compared to its root volume available. It ...


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I have seen nutrient solution stored at final use dilution. It tends to grow algae, but that is not a problem. This should work. The air bubbler is not needed as mixing is not needed, and has a problem. There is a chance of the warm solution eventually growing Legionaires disease bacteria, and the aerosols produced by the bubbler can be breathed in to give ...


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It's probably nothing to worry about, no pest, no disease, just a mechanical bend or twist or bump. Keep in mind that when the growing tip is young the tissues are very fragile, wrapped in a tight bundle. Any bump or knock could fracture the leaf, and since the cells are so young they will dry out at the edge, causing odd shapes and marks. Provided there is ...


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Is the plant near a heat source or draft? I can't tell what it is, but in the top picture, bottom right hand corner I see a white-ish device that could be a heater. Be sure to protect your plants from heat sources or drafts as that could damage their leaves.


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The most common factors for yellowing money tree leaves are too much sunlight, wide range of temperature fluctuations throughout the day and/or over-watering. Do not leave yellowing leaves on until they turn brown since it can spread decay to other parts of the plant.


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It's not really a good idea - the cactus needs fast draining soil mix, and water is very much reduced or even suspended in winter during dormancy. They also need a position with some evening or morning sunlight. The Dracaena marginata needs watering year round, and just needs ordinary potting soil, as well as medium or bright light conditions, but without ...


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yes ofcourse if they have similar environmental requirements :) all you need to do is check out the growing environment that both require and if they match then it's all good in the hood :) you will need a bigger pot to give them both enough space you have a Dracaena and that plant requires filtered light so not direct sun but the cactus loves full sun ...


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looks like aphids luckily to get rid of them you have a few options available I would recommend using soapy water first simply mix non toxic washing up liquid with water then spray all over the plant from top to bottom. making sure you spray under the leaves as well. the soap bubbles will suffocate the aphids. also if you also want you can use ...


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it sounds like too much water while it was dormant. to find out if its too much water you need to check the roots for root rot. spider plants need intervals between watering times and in winter it should be around 3 weeks depending on humidity and temperatures this plant should be slightly root bound before repotting. the roots hold large amounts of ...


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In the winter, I water my spider plant maybe once a month. It's in a cool location (60 degrees F, so something like 17-18C) with only diffuse light, and has a ton of little spiders hanging from it. Generally, half of the spiders die each winter, which is expected behaviour. Right now, it's even blooming. I suspect that you're watering it WAY too much. Mine ...


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Chlorophytum has very thick, fleshy roots where it stores water to supply to the leaves. The problem is that as the plant ages and the roots accumulate, they start to push the soil out of the pot. Watering wets the roots, but flushes more and more soil out of the pot until there is hardly any soil left - the pot is mostly full of roots. At this point ...


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I can see what might be black insects on some of the stems, but can't see them clearly. I can also see some white, oblong objects or marks on top of a leaf about halfway down on the left hand side of the second photo - again, its not possible to see them clearly. These might just be aphids (blackfly) in which case it's worth spraying with an insecticide ...


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It is a palm, my guess is Rhapis excelsa, since it is a common indoor palm (house plant) which looks very similar and has hairy seed pods as well. Here an example of how the seeds look like. Here are some pictures of these plants in the same life phase, I am not the seller, I just found them on google. Be sure that the pot has good drainage, and remove ...


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From the evidence we have in the leaves we can observe that the midribs are strong and lustrous green but the patches of yellow are on the outside of the leaves. Dracaena is a monocot, which tells us that the veins in the leaves run mainly lengthwise in the leaf, with little sideways translocation as would happen in a dicot which has a branching vein system. ...


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A closely related Ficus Benjamina I had many years ago, had the same problem: Bottom leaves falling off. One thing which stood-out when I attempted to repot it, is being rootbound. After a while, the roots are too big to keep spreading, and will start turning around the edges of the pot. Given that (from your description) it did not start immediately to ...


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Rubber plants (Ficus elastica) can be hard pruned and can respond well. In the wild they are trees, so they can certainly get bigger if you want. Just bear in mind that that pot is not very big for the size of plant, so pruning may buy you time before you need to repot. Cuts 1 and 2 look about right - it will look better if you can just above a branch and ...


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Not without providing additional nutrients. Vermiculite is inert and contains negligible amounts of nutrients, and your plants would quickly show signs of nutrient deficiencies if provided with water alone. However, as a substrate in a hydroponics system where a nutrient solution is used, it can perform well although other substrates are more commonly used ...


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I believe this plant is a Hylocereus, which is a genus of epiphytic jungle cactus. The brown patches you see look like corking which is the hardening/thickening of the skin/flesh in older parts of cactus plants. It's not a bad thing, but too much can indicate potential insect or disease problems. Check yours carefully for any small insects or fine webbing ...


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It looks like a Lemon Lime Dracaena The plant is very healthy and just the right height if it's still young


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It's desperate for more root room, even though the topgrowth does not look too bad - repot asap, as previously suggested in the Q & A you link to. UPDATE: Use a pot one size larger than its current one, although two sizes larger won't do much harm; remove the plant from its current pot and settle into the new pot, filling in with potting soil. As for ...


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I am pretty certain that's a variety of wondering jew. They like plenty of light and water, you can also root from cuttings in water. One thing to caution you on, they are an invasive plant, if planted outdoors in warm climates, they tend to take over.


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It may well be underwatering or root rot from being too wet causing this, but does the pot it's in have drainage holes in the bottom, or have you planted it straight into a ceramic planter without holes? To check if its root rot, gently tug the affected leaf upwards - if it separates from the base of the plant easily, it's likely the roots are rotting - this ...


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Regardless of which plants or plant types you choose, I would suggest you focus on two significant (IMHO) points... Microclimate; Health of growing medium. To explain in more detail... 1. Microclimate You note you intend to maintain a room temperature with low humidity. Let me assume 21°C / 70°F and RH less than 50%. Whichever plants you choose, you ...


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I've seen the most breath taking 'roof tops' and vertical walls planted with just succulents. They have a very condensed and shallow root system. They store their own water. Try looking at this site. Also 'Lake Washington Live A boards Roof Top gardens' out of Seattle Washington. Using succulents in a vertical planter is like painting a picture in oil. ...


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Fig trees of all kinds except the really tall ones prefer bright but indirect light. Since your Starlight is variegated it will grow better in really good light since it shows less green to the light than other fully green types. Put it out on the deck in a protected spot on bright, warm cloudy days but hide it from direct sun. For soil you want something ...


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Assuming the planter you mean is the one shown in the link below, you are unlikely to be able to create a large area of plant cover on the wall you select, because there is restricted root room within the planter. If you wanted to cover a large area of wall, Hedera helix varieties are the most likely to produce a fair amount of cover. This link https://www....


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if you like cooking edible herbs would be my choice


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Contrary to other answers, you can certainly recycle used HDPE plastic into "new" products at home. First you must locate suitable plastic (looking at the recycling numbers on any used plastic you already have). Then you chop it up, either manually or using some kind of shredder. Then melt and form, being careful to only use shop tools, not your kitchen oven....


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Is it an older leaf? Plants loose old leaves all the time. That should be expected. I'm not sure where you are located, but indoors full shade is equal to dense shade outdoors. Your plant can get some direct light indoors. This plant would benefit from morning sun. Outdoors in hot climates it should be in light shade, but not dense. If you are ...


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Change one of the following, --- give it more light. It looks pale from lack of light. Plants that are getting the right amount of light stand up taller. --- The roots are not getting enough oxygen. -The soil is either too dense or -the plant is root bound. If the soil is too dense them take it out of the pot, wash off the roots add drainage to the soil ...


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Actually that is Tree Philodendron (Philodendron bipinnatifidum) (AKA Philodendron Selloum) If grown outdoors it prefers morning sun with dappled shade the remainder of the day or dappled shade the entire day. If the temperatures drop below 15°C (60°F), it should be brought inside in winter. Inside in winter, it should be given a bright window with as ...


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Unless your plant is still just a seedling, you should just allow it to go dormant for the winter. If it is outdoors lift it out of the pond and bring it indoors to a cool, not cold, location sitting in wading pool of water. The water does not need to be deep just enough to keep the plant wet through out the winter. Ideally the water should stay around 40-...


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The seedlings are showing the difference between Epigeal germination, where the cotyledon(s) are pushed above ground and protect the developing leaves, and Hypogeal where they remain below ground. There are plant families where different species show different behaviour, including the Araucariaceae which are southern-hemisphere conifers and also lilies and ...


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I can't see why not. As long as you do not have extended periods of cold below 10°c then you should be able to grow both of these plants with no problem. Give them bright indirect or diffused light. A good potting soil in a pot with holes in the bottom. Water them when they need it, never letting the soil completely dry out. Rain water is preferable. ...


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You can keep it in water long term, but only the roots the stem should be kept dry. What you have is a very very basic hydroponic set-up. You will need to change the water often to keep fresh water that is full of oxygen. You will want to use a heat mat to keep the temp of the water around 20°c (70°f). You do not want the water to get too hot, because ...


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Possibly just been potted up before sale. Grab a teaspoon, and gently excavate at the edge. If you find the digging easy with no roots, then it has just been potted up. Treat as Bamboo suggests. If it dies totally, do a post-mortem on the roots.


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I'd like to know more about where you bought this Jasmine - if it was indoors in the houseplant section of a garden centre or a supermarket, then it's likely Jasminum polyanthemum, which is not fully hardy outdoors in the UK and is sold as a temporary, flowering houseplant whilst it is actually in bloom. Other,similar Jasmines are intended to be planted ...


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Grady Player is right that the plant is a Jade Plant and they like dry soil and lots of sunlight. The white spots seems to be on the plant and the moss which makes me think they are mealybug. Your test is to get a toothpick and a magnifying glass. If you can pick a white spot off the plant with the toothpick and it moves then it's mealy bug. You can find ...


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The Plant is a Jade Plant (Crassula ovata)... with Sphagnum moss growing below it... generally Jade Plants want to be fairly dry, and Sphagnum moss grows in bogs... I think you are probably overwatering it... as for the white stuff on the moss... probably fungal... could also be some sort of arthropod pest though (can't see in the photo.)


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Really looks like a Cymbidium orchid, one of the hardy species perhaps. The roots in loose clothing matches, and the pseudobulbs of the dead stems.


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