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This plant has white fly. The definitive test between this and powdery mildew which is also white is that if you shake the plant some of the adults will fly off. I normally recommend 5 ml dish soap to 1 liter water sprayed or rubbed on the leaves. Apply three times every 5 to seven days. If you are using this plant for cooking having soap residue on the ...


3

The seedlings are quite etiolated - the high sides of the box they're in won't be helping that, but regardless,you need to keep them out of direct sunlight, they're too small to cope with that at this stage. Given where you are, the fact that it's winter and daylight hours are short, that's most likely what the problem is, insufficient light. Seeds always ...


1

I have 3 red cyclamen plants. Two of them I have had for about 7 years and they have never stopped blooming. The 3rd plant I bought about 3 years ago and it has never stopped blooming either. I do lightly feed them about once per month. I do not change their soil. Right now I have 22 fully open blossoms (on the 3 plants) and many buds. For years now I kept ...


3

It is Fatsia japonica, an evergreen plant that can be grown outdoors as well as inside. It tolerates low light levels well, but it does need cooler temperatures in winter, as well as not being at all happy in overheated rooms generally. Information on care indoors here https://homeguides.sfgate.com/grow-fatsia-japonica-indoors-70510.html. Please inspect ...


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I've read that tap water may contain salts and Fluorine which accumulate at the edge of the leaf. Rainwater or A/C runoff is best with dilluted fertilizer. But that's not all. They require high humidity and should not be fertilized when soil is dry. Watering should allow constant moisture but not overwatering (think of rainforest floor: water drains but ...


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I will start with the size of your pot. It appears from the close up pictures your pot is oversized for your plant. The pot will hold too much water for your plant can absorb. This can cause leaves to yellow, root rot and edema (blisters on the leaves). If you plant had completely filled its last pot wit roots then it was time to repot it in a larger pot ...


1

It may be an issue with your water. Are you using tap? Ive found Calathea definitely prefer filtered/distilled water. They are picky plants for sure.


3

I've tried growing carrots from seeds inside sealed plastic bottles with LED lighting. I've written up the project here. I dried the soil before putting it in the bottle so that I could control the amount of water present in the bottle. The main challenge I found was getting the amount of water just right so that the plant has enough water, but the soil ...


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It looks like the kind of accumulation that happens when a plant is spritzed/sprayed with water that contains something in suspension. Note how the brown fuzzies are in the sharp angular crook of a petiole and stem, where sprayed on moisture is likely to accumulate and hang around after the rest of the plant dries off. If you spritz it regularly check inside ...


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I do see something odd on the leaves - the ones to the right seem to have some sort of greyish fuzzy deposit; whether the underside also shows that crack or line visible in the one you're holding, I can't tell. There may also be something grey and fuzzy surrounding what looks like a growth bud at the bottom of the leaf petiole on the left, with corky brown ...


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Yes, snake plants are loved because you can put them in some of the worse conditions and they remain the same. Where many plants would fail in a entryway with very little real light a Sensevieria, snake plant will remain the same for many month, years, before showing any sign of stress. The plant will also not change much in ideal conditions. If it is ...


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I only see at the petiole either auxilary bud, stipule, flower bud, all normal part of a growing plant. No scale. Other than that I see dust. Dirty plants will attract pest like spider mite. I suggest you also inspect the roots. If the plant looks overall unhappy, most problems start in the soil. Often plants that are unhappy/unhealthy, attract predators. ...


1

I would use a micorfiber cloth or cotton to clean the leaves. Unless you use wet sopallin. Dry sopallin will not remove the dust


2

Google tells me that 'sopalin' means kitchen paper or kitchen paper roll. No, don't use that, its too rough. The best thing to use is either a paintbrush (specially a larger paint brush of the type that children might use to do a painting) or a blusher brush, or any type of brush used for make up for the face. I suppose an ordinary paintbrush intended to ...


0

This appears to be a Parlour Palm, Chamaedorea elegans. I don't like the look of the blackened parts, that might indicate over rather than underwatering at some point, but you can cut out damaged fronds at the base, where they arise from. I think you should move it away from the window - it's not clear whether it gets any sun, but they don't like direct ...


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I cut the bottoms from PET clear plastic bottles , sizes are not very large. I also have a couple ceramic coated aluminum frying pans thrown out by a neighbor, removed the handles. Occasionally you can find a plastic planting pot with no drain holes and cut off the bottom (they likely came with pond plants that love water).


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I use pie or cake tins, and sometimes small aluminum cookie sheets, purchased at garage sales or thrift shops for maybe 25 cents each. While not plastic, they're certainly durable. Eventually they'll rust inside, at which point I recycle and replace. Following Bamboo's and Stephie's advice, you could also purchase tons of old plates from these same sources, ...


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I'm pretty sure its not possible to make your own plastic 12 inch trays, but you may be able to find another way round it. I don't know whether you mean for use outdoors or indoors, nor whether you really need 12 inch trays rather than something a little smaller, but I save some recyclable plastic trays originally acquired as part of packaging on vegetables, ...


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Making the kind of plastic saucers sold at stores is nearly impossible unless you have access to plastic molding equipment. But I recommend you think outside the box and remember that they are called “saucers” for a reason - our grandmas probably used real saucers or plates, either very decorative ones matching decorated pots (think Victorian estates) or ...


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I use thrift stores. Sometimes I find actual clay plant saucers (.50 cents) but mostly I’ll buy dessert/salad plates to use as saucers. Often I can find Arcoroc clear glass cup saucers or patterned plates with bright colors or flowers. I never pay more than .50 cents for any of it and keeps it out of landfill.


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The short answer is NO. You can exactly melt plastic meld plastic in your basement. You could come up with ways around it by trying something else, like; make hypertufa then seal it. Then you spent just as much. Terra cotta are often less expensive than plastic. Try the dollar store. Pie tins are cheap. Keep an eye out for used one on a local website. Post ...


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It certainly isn't "natural" for a desert cactus to have a continuous supply of water, but they seem to be healthy enough growing continuously for half the year if they do have sufficient light, heat, and water. But in the UK I have no experience of trying to keep them growing continuously all year round with artificial light in winter, and for my ...


1

It would seem not,though there is little research in regard to the health of any succulent plant should it not experience dormancy. There isn't much difference in the dormancy story between desert or any other type of cacti or succulent either; dormancy or partial dormancy can be triggered by periods of stress or drought, as well as the more usual cooler ...


0

The difficulty with this piece of plant (and yes, it might be a Hoya) is its length and the fact that the rooty material is along the length. Added to that, if you're in the northern hemisphere, now is not really the time to start cuttings off this plant, its best done in spring and early summer. That said, we are where we are; I can only suggest that you ...


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From what i can see, it looks like it might be a Hoya. It appears from the picture the orginial grower may have been doing the braiding of the vines stems and they were using a bamboo stick to aid in the process. Easy to do with a Hoya vine. Also Hoya have the most amazing flowers, but first it needs to be in a pot for a few years with its root ...


2

Fittonia likes humidity, heat and indirect light. The first two are essential, and there is some movement on the third as least important. Its natural environment is in a steamy tropical forest. A close substitute in a temperate environment is under the benches of a steam heated greenhouse, where it can grow in poor soil but constantly dripped on from ...


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The growth looks like it is probably some sort of ficus... some grow fairly gnarly, some grow pretty straight, training it shouldn't be different than anything else, bind with sticks and twine or wire, and trim off growth that isn't where you want it.


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