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Perilla is an annual herb and can be subject to rust which shows as rust coloured spots. As the spots on the leaves in the picture are light coloured it looks like aphids or spider mites which suck sap. Spider mites are the size of a grain of salt and cluster on the undersides of the leaves. You may need a magnifying glass to see them. They make a web when ...


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Just off the picture alone (which is not enough to be certain) my guess would be that the plant has root rot. You might want to check if the roots of the plant look healthy. My thought process for this guess is that the older leaves are very dry (roots probably rotted away and could not suck up enough water), while there are no signs of limping/wilting (this ...


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I have had this issue over the last two years in Ohio. I have eliminated white flies, and aphids from my suspects. I am pretty sure the damage I have experiences is from stink bugs.


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Turning up heat in the room to about 22 degrees may help. I would recommend moving the plant to where there is sunshine so it grows better. I wouldn’t use filtered tap water since it does not include the minerals that are needed for your plant. In conclusion, the main thing you should do is that the water you give to your plant is mineral water/ tap water. ...


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In an effort to close this discussion, I noticed that my tomatoes that grew in contact with the concrete below them (have only a small plot of dirt and they grew over onto the cement) had blotchy skins like this, which on further examination extended through most of the flesh of the tomato. I don't yet know why this is the case but when compared to the other ...


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If you want to add a support such as a moss stick, I suggest you wait to repot till late February/early March when daylight is not in such short supply, if you can bear to - you will need to insert the stick into the soil and this may well cause some root damage which, as others say, is harder for the plant to recover from at this time of year. In the ...


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Bence is right about that. I would just add that the plant may be growing outwards, having the leaves facing the window growing bigger, maybe finding the light intensity from the window more suitable than what's around the pot area. In the warmth inside the house you may still notice some growth, albeit slowed down. I don't know how warm is the area, but ...


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You can repot plants during the winter with care. If you leave the root-ball intact and you just back fill the extra space around it in the new pot you do not have to worry. The key is not to bother with the roots. Usually plants should be repotted during the growing season so they have better conditions to regenerate any damage to the roots, etc. Note that ...


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Alocasias have bulbs and can be grown from bulbs, How to grow an Alocasia from a bulb. So what you have found in the pot are unsprouted Alocasia bulbs. These plants often could go dormant, loosing all of their leaves and becoming a stump just to regrow from the bulb next spring. Here is an Alocasia bulb from the article above.


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I would put my bet on over watering. ZZ plants are a very low light tolerant plant getting them grow lights is not necessary for the winter or in general. The fact that you have doubled up the watering since the grow-lights have been installed, it is the possible root cause. With ZZ plants it is enough to water when the soil gets completely dry. During ...


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Pothos, Devil's ivy, in Asia it is called money plant but I don't know why.


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This palm has a well established colony of mealy bug. Using a magnifying glass will show them better as they hide in a white powdery layer of wax. You can try controlling them with a mix of 5 ml of dish soap to one liter of water. Dip a cloth in the solution and wipe all surfaces of the plant. Do this three times every five to seven days to catch the eggs ...


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Personally what I'd worry about the most is the temperature. Storages in general have no heating whatsoever, yet all the plants you've mentioned are basically tropical plants, so they must be kept at least at room temperature (or just slightly below that at worst) at all times. With that being said out of the plants the Dracaena tolerates the lack of light ...


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More finicky Philodendrons have unfurling issues due to low humidity but with your plant it should not be an issue. I think what you have is a pest issue, probably Thrips (but can be other as well). Here are a couple of images from a Monstera and a Philodendron Brasil that had/has Thrips infection and look similar. These insects are very tiny and very hard ...


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I'm pretty confident that the pictured plant is an Aeonium of some kind. The keys are The upright "trunk" and branching The flattened rosette of leaves at the end of each "stem" The way in which the leaves whorl about the center in each rosette The leaf shape If this is an aeonium, then care is relatively easy, beginning with "DO ...


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It is possibly not because of the tap water. That would cause mineral build-up in the tips and edges of the leaves which would lead to crispiness in those areas not yellowing in general. Low humidity would cause similar symptoms as tap water, crispiness instead of overall yellowing. Based on that you have upped the watering I would suspect root rot. You ...


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The two linear cracks on the bottom leaf are almost certainly caused by physical damage to the leaf. The pot may have tipped over and that leaf was caught underneath, or it may have been shoved to the back or side of a shelf and crushed against the wall. The other damage on that leaf probably happened at the same time. The spots on the top leaf are more ...


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I think the leaves start to yellow and drop because of the too small size of the container. The rootball is too small for the size of the plant above ground and therefore it cannot take up enough nutrients. Some leaves therefore will be sacrificed, the nutrients are taken from these leaves and you'll get yellowing and eventually dropping. The top of the ...


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If the rhizomes looked like this, then they're canna lilies: Note that they're not true lilies because they have rhizomes, not bulbs. Cannas are very easy to grow in the ground (kind of a "plant it and forget it" plant), but just a little bit harder in containers. According to this site, caring for cannas in pots is quite similar to caring for ...


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Per @Polypipe Wrangler, definitely a Canna. They come in a wide variety of colors which you won't know until it blooms. They do very well in wet locations; they do well in an inch of water in my pond bog. Also do well in drained sandy soil with occasional water.


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Nowadays the Peace lilies sold commercially are forced to bloom. They use gibberellic acid which will make the plants bloom within 3-4 months, when they will sell it. They are forced to bloom with gibberellic acid, a natural plant hormone that stimulates cell division and elongation. So if you have bought a Peace lily that was in bloom, it does not mean ...


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They're thrips, and are very contagious and persistent. There are several ways to treat them, you could google to see one that suits you. Best of luck, definitely isolate the sick plants as they spread. Best of luck!


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My best guess is Cissus rotundifolia Vahl also known as Arabian Wax Cissus:


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The formulation of your bonsai fertiliser isn't much use to the type of plants you mention; they will require higher levels of nitrogen. For instance, Baby Bio is a good liquid houseplant fertiliser, and its NPK is roughly 10-4-7, so you can easily see the difference in the NPK value between that and your bonsai fertiliser. Whatever you decide to do with the ...


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The white stuff is hyphae or fungal strands; the soil in the pot seems to have some debris (uncomposted material) and this is probably why the fungal strands are there. The other factor needed to produce this type of fungus is moisture, but the soil in the pot does not look wet. It will not affect the health of your plant, but if you don't like constantly ...


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The dry and warm air flow could create a very low humidity micro climate there, lower than your average humidity would be in the apartment. This would definitely kill anything that has thin foliage and in general requires moderate humidity, around 40-50%. (I have killed a Parlor palm this way, because I have forgot to move it in time.) Your choices could be ...


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On the whole, above the radiator would be a bad place to put a plant due to the drying nature of sitting above a heater. There are several plants that like it warm, so the higher temperature is not necessarily a major problem, depending on the plant. Perhaps, perhaps, you could find a very dry loving plant and just give it a try to see how it goes. I lean ...


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My father as a child took a chomp out of a sansevieria, he described it as just tasting painfully, eye wateringly, stinging bad, he has since survived to be a 74 year old retired botanist... If you don't notice it altering the taste of your drink I would think that you are well below the threshold of toxicity.


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Sansevieria is only toxic if eaten - and then you'll only get an upset stomach because it's not that poisonous. There's no danger from placing it near food or drink.


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Finally found the answer: they are wood sorrel seeds! http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/bug%E2%80%99s-eye-view/2019/yellow-wood-sorrel-seed-vol-5-no-30


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I wouldn't worry about that , see the new leave it is glossy and shinny , mostly this is due to weather change. I have same plant variegated and not variegated and both have 2 or 3 leaves with slight damage but new leaves are in good shape


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