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I bought this plant for my house a few months ago. Over the winter it dropped 80% of its leaves and I was going to throw it out. Instead I cut back all the old branches that didn’t have any leaves on them and aerated the soil using chopsticks or a pencil. The next week I had loads of new leaves growing at the top of the plant and a month later the bottom as ...


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I imagine it was not originally this color and was much closer to the one remaining part that looks like a tan/yellowy green ball? I do not know much about cacti specifically, but the dramatic color change is very disturbing. This article gives a few different causes and a few possible remedies. It is looking rather bleak for your cacti, especially since I'm ...


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Production of offsets is a normal process which happens when the mother plant is growing vigorously and has proceeded beyond the juvenile stage and has progressed to flowering and a degree of maturity. So all you really have to do is keep it growing vigorously, giving it space to grow and flourish. As with other plants that produce underground storage organs ...


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I have only accomplished one season of tomato growing, but I feel fairly confident in saying that the problem is over-watering made worse by the pot and soil. I have included several links detailing other potential reasons for the wilting and yellow leaves. I would think as you work to remedy the water situation it would become increasingly clear if over-...


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It can be a sign of nutrient deprivation, in other words it can use some fertilizer. How often do you fertilize it? I think because of spring it wants to grow and needs some extra nutrients therefore.


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Usually Aroids such as Monstera deliciousa puts out one leaf at a time and do not really have energy to put out multiple leaves at the same time on the same stem. For some reason yours has started to put out two leaves but it did not have enough energy to finish both of them. Such new leaf browning, withering could occur in case of overwatering or due to ...


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I have seen many different members of the Ficus family including the fiddle leaf fig grown in similar substrates. The problems that could occur are: these plants get quite tall. In the wild they grow up to 45 feet tall so indoors they need to be cut back frequently or they will be up to the ceiling. So much top weight makes them harder to keep balanced ...


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I think it is a cape jasmine (Gardenia jasminoides). It will produce white flowers that are extremely fragrant. It likes full sun, but tolerates light shade as well. For soil, it like consistently moist well-drained soil.


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It looks like Peperomia, and judging from the shape of the leaves I would say a raindrop Peperomia (P. polybotrya). The Peperomia likes bright but indirect light, and warm temperatures. I have one on a north-east facing window, so it gets only a little bit of direct sunlight very early in the morning in summertime. Watering: let the soil dry up completely ...


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This is a friendship plant (Billbergia nutans), which is indeed from the Bromeliaceae (Bromeliad) family. Here some pictures of the flowers, they originate from South America. Its an easy houseplant (very resistant to neglect), and is easily propagated by splitting. Here some more details about the plant.


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