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15

If I get your question right, should you pinch the buds of the basil plant before they flower in order to maximize leaf production? Answer yes. If you don't trim the buds off, then they will flower, growing up into a tall stalk on your basil plant and producing a tower of seeds. Producing seeds will become Basil plant's "Job 1", and it will neglect leaf ...


13

I would suggest a slightly different approach: Make cuttings from the top(s), that way you will get smaller and compact plants (that you can then prune before they get long and leggy) and with a bit of luck see new growth from the bottom of the old one as well. And it won’t matter if not. For shaping, note that basil will always favor the tops / ends of the ...


12

It won't digest live plant matter. Venus flytraps secrete the enzymes phosphatase, proteinase, nuclease and amylase. These enzymes target insect prey, which have high levels of protein. They do not digest plant matter. When a leaf closes on a bug, it (the bug) will often secrete chemicals such as uric acid, which keep the leaf closed. Otherwise (such as if ...


11

That is a type of jade plant. I want to preface my advice by saying that bonsai die, it's what they do best and if you want your plant to look like a bonsai you are going to need to prune it hard which may kill your plant. If it were my personal plant, I would cut that thing right down so that each branch only had an inch still remaining so that I would ...


11

Cut off all dead wood at the base, leaving just the live stems - you don't need to do anything to the roots. You might, though, want to consider replacing the plant - it'll look pretty ugly once the dead stuff has been removed. This plant doesn't regenerate from old wood, so you won't get any new growth other than on the two existing live stems.


11

Every bud can become a shoot/branch. If you don't want branches where buds appear (like on the trunk close to the ground), just rub them off. If you've waited so long that they are now shoots that you don't want, remove them with your pruner. That's all there is to it. Fruit trees are frequently grafted to roots of a different variety, or even a different ...


11

If you cut the root you will damage the leaves that are fed by that root. That root also provides structural stability. A better idea is to rebuild or remove the retaining wall in that area. The root will only get bigger and they can move quite large stones and interlock.


10

The only time you usually remove leaves which are slightly damaged or part dead is if the plant is highly ornamental and it's detracting from its appearance, or the leaf is damaged by some kind of infection or invader. Otherwise, just wait for the leaf to shrivel and fall off naturally, or remove it when it's at that stage.


9

If you prune before end of summer, you're pruning off fruit that could develop in the fall. I've never heard of pruning in summer so a tree could recover before winter. Pruning should done in the dormant season, as figs bleed a latex sap if pruned during the growing season. Link Pruning of fig trees should be done during cold weather if possible. Slow ...


9

No, don't cut this one back,it'll ruin its structure, and anyway, they bleed like crazy if you cut them. The thing to remember about any Ficus is they're fussy - they absolutely hate a change in conditions, and in particular, a draught. Indoors, most will drop leaves when the seasons change, so in spring and again in autumn, and mostly because the heating ...


9

You definitely need to do some pruning. Before you start pruning a tree, you should find all of the graft points. Since you have multi-graft trees, there should be one graft at the point where each main branch comes off of the trunk. As you are pruning, keep in mind that if you cut a grafted branch off or cut it back so close to this graft that it will have ...


9

Oh my goodness. Do you understand the treasure you have? Find a master pruner to create a covered walkway! How wonderful. If you destroy this tree I will haunt you when I am dead! (Grins). That tree should not be getting taller at all. Weeping trees are two trees grafted together; a prostrate variety of the same species grafted on top of an upright ...


9

The white patches mostly appear to be one of the lichens rather than fungal mycelium - the fact that they're under the moss isn't unusual, and no treatment is required. Moss and lichens often occur together on old trees, but it is true that weak, very old or diseased trees tend to have more lichen growth on them. Even if there is some fungal mycelium in ...


9

You can also prune when it freezes, without problems. I do that regularly under snow and have never had a problem. It is also done regularly in my region. Just: don't prune too much early: wait a few weeks until after the last leaves fall, in order to let the starch to reach the roots. if your region could have a strong freeze (less than -15° C, 5° F), ...


8

The traditional way to do this is to buy an apple tree which is grafted onto a dwarfing root stock such as E.M.26. You can keep fruit trees smaller but it's more work without the right rootstock. Keep in mind that even semi dwarf rootstock will "grow to be twice as tall as the average person". Things you can do are listed here but can be summarized as: ...


8

What is cascade style and what are the basic steps involved? Cascade style is where your tree trails down over the side of its pot. The overall most basic shape of a bonsai is a triangle, in order for your bonsai to maintain a nice shape you should be able to shape the tree around the idea of a triangle from the viewing side. The viewing side is the side of ...


8

Many apples fruit from multi-year-old "spurs" - specialized branches that mostly grow the clusters of flower buds. It sounds to me like you may have accidentally pruned a lot of your fruiting spurs off with the water sprouts and other extra branches.


8

According to Wayne K. Clatterbuck in the article Tree Wounds on the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Tree Care Kit: Research indicates that wound dressings (materials such as tar or paint) do not prevent decay and may even interfere with wound closure. Wound dressings can have the following detrimental effects: Prevent drying and encourage fungal growth ...


8

It would seem the scion is at the base of your plant, as shown in the second picture. Therefore, the branch you're concerned about is not a sucker because it doesn't arise from below the scion, or graft, or from below soil level. It might be a watersprout, although it doesn't look overly vigorous, and you will know whether its growing much faster than the ...


8

Pruning the branch back hard/heavily is about the only thing that will keep the crotch from splitting, aside from guy wiring it to other parts of the tree. For all practical intents, that joint will never get stronger. However, there is no reason to wait until next season. You can remove the branch anytime during the growing season (trees naturally ...


8

Allow the side shoots to grow. Bush beans are bred to be bushy, so by removing them you're fighting the plants' natural growth habit. The side shoots also carry leaves, which will provide more energy for making baby beans, and flowers, which will turn into those baby beans. The typical spacing that I've seen for bush beans is 6" between plants in a row, so ...


8

Lavender is a plant that can get straggly if it's not pruned, but it's a small perennial shrub, so its needs are very different from basil which is an herbaceous annual. Essentially, you allow lavender to grow until it's reached the size you want for the place you've planted it. Then, every year after that, you cut it back by about ⅓ of its size; it ...


8

You may be right - the grafted part died back, the rootstock took over, and the only part that's left of the original grafted lemon is at the bottom. It shouldn't be thorny - the thorny parts will be off the rootstock, which might be sour lemon or some other citrus rootstock, hard to say, but growth off the stock might very well be thorny. If the leaves on ...


8

I think the grouping would look more logical if it were made on the way the trees set fruit: stone fruit trees (plum, apricot) are the early bloomers, while the trees with fruits that contain seeds (apple and pear) are the late bloomers. One thing important when pruning is that different species form their flower buds the previous year, while others form ...


8

You can certainly try to, but you will face at least two significant problems: Apical dominance - if you cut out the leader (the strongest shoot right at the top of the tree) this will trigger other shoots to try to take over the job of stretching upwards. Several shoots might try to become the leader, but there will be a constant stretch upwards so it is a ...


8

The cut is fine but the tree has or will have issues. You can see that there is already interior decay in the heartwood of the tree. As stormy indicates water will enter the wound and decay will continue. Do not put tar on the wound or do anything else. Research has shown further action with sealants is harmful to the tree as this answer indicates. On ...


7

In one word, no, sorry! Training an evergreen by practicing topiary starts when the plant is small and involves repeated prunings over a few years. If you took your existing evergreens and pruned them into spiral shapes you would expose inside areas of the plant where there is no growth. Most evergreens do not bud or grow from old wood with the exception ...


7

Summer is the time to remove vigorous growth and keep the tree to a manageable size. Winter is the time to structurally prune and to stimulate lots of new growth. Say, for instance, you have a tree with 5 branches. In winter, the sap moves down out of the 5 branches. Then you cut 3 of the branches away. In spring, when the sap rises, it will be looking ...


7

We've grown Autumn Bliss for years - it's a great variety! Yes, you should be able to prune now. Once a cane has fruited and you have taken all the fruit you want from it, cut it down to near the ground. It will not fruit properly again, and will probably die on its own over the winter anyway, so you aren't really losing anything, especially once the new ...


7

You don't say where you are growing your cucumbers. (IE, greenhouse, outside, covered bed, etc.) If you could give more information it would be helpful. The kind of intense pruning you are talking about is generally only done for cucumbers being grown intensively, and especially those grown in greenhouses where growing space is very expensive and diseases ...


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