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12

There is no "exact" answer to this question, but it appears you already know the minimum it can last without water by your own unintended experiment. Though not a perfect answer, I hope the following can help you out. Succulents need water - it's commonly known (almost to the point of being an exaggerated myth) that succulents and cacti need very little ...


12

The aloe is not growing in that medium. Sugar dissolves, rice and coffee decompose, when exposed to the conditions required for a healthy root zone. They would sour and kill the plant roots. Not suitable at all for growing plants in. It's either temporary, or someone doesn't know what they're doing, or the plant is in an inside pot. What you could do, if ...


9

Based on the plump, browning tips on the leaves, this initially appears to be classic aloe over-watering response. BUT, once every three weeks isn't necessarily an unreasonable watering schedule for an aloe, if the soil is appropriate. As you have correctly observed, the soil is a very dark peat-based soil. It holds water very well and drains out slowly, ...


9

The damaged leaves will not heal, and the weakened narrow portion of stem will remain that way. It can grow from the end, though, and that can be healthy. It was obviously suffering from etiolation. I think the best method of action starts with repotting the aloe. Use a free draining cactus mix, and a free draining pot. You can repot the pups in separate ...


8

This plant is an aloe. It's a desert dwelling succulent. In warm weather they can handle being watered once a month, sometimes more often in HOT weather. Indoors they can often go several months without water before they complain. If they're watered frequently they start to suffer from drowning and root rot very quickly. The lower leaves of your plant appear ...


8

First, here is what sunburn looks like on an aloe leaf: And here is what etiolation looks like on an aloe (this one's actually mine :o): Mine is etiolated because it's in the basement under fluorescent lighting, which is on 24/7. That plus the warm temperatures are confusing to the plant. Mine responded by trying to grow (although I haven't watered it ...


7

Your profile says you're in Minnesota. Have you recently tried moving it outside? Aloe loves sun, but after being indoors for the winter the plant needs to be gently reintroduced to direct sunlight, a few hours a day at first, then longer. Otherwise it can suffer a burn that looks a lot like those browning leaf tips. Also, does a 1 week watering schedule ...


7

Actually, I was in a similar situation a few weeks ago: A friend gave me an aloe crown that looked exactly like yours (i.e. slightly dry stem, no roots). What worked for me was to simply plant it into a pot with a mix of normal potting soil and some sand, water it and wait. It seems to have rooted quickly, at least it already started growing one or two new ...


7

It's hard to tell from the photos but the leaves on your problematic aloe seem different to your "other aloe". Perhaps they're different species and thus will have different different habits ie. not supporting themselves well. It looks like you have have three aloe babies growing in that one pot. It'd be better if you lifted them into separate pots, placing ...


7

You should definitely re-pot the three "babies" in separate pots, to get them away from the old dead material which is a constant risk for attracting bugs, fungus diseases, etc. Possibly they are not getting enough light - I think the plantlet at the front of your picture looks a bit "leggy". Remove the old damaged leaves (using a sterilized knife) when you ...


6

I think a couple of things are going on here. I think your other two questions will solve most of your issue. I don't know if your aloe will recover or not from the pictures. From my experience with other plants, when that many leaves look that yellow, then chances are slim that it will survive. You do have a few good leaves at the bottom. So the aloe is a ...


6

I have had several aloe plants derived from one tiny plant 29 years ago! I am in Michigan and they live on my window sill facing east so they get the morning sun. They have thrived so much that I have repotted several of the pups for centerpieces at a wedding shower and a baby shower. I did pot some to put on my outdoor deck one summer and the direct sun ...


6

The trouble with gardening is, ask a panel of experts a question and you'll get 3 different answers. I remember your original question on this plant and then, you believed you should wait for the peat soil it was in to dry out before attempting to repot in different soil. That wasn't true, and I don't think this latest thing is any more true either - when I ...


6

The short answer to your question's title is no, not all varieties are safe to consume, because I'm guessing, when you say aloe vera, you mean any aloe rather than that particular variety. There is a great deal of confusion about Aloe and its varietal names. Many people refer to any Aloe as Aloe vera, even though they are not - although they may be Aloe, ...


6

Too much sun, no easy, slow transition from dim inside light to right out in the harsh sun - Aloes really hate that, IME. Put the poor things in the shade and give them time. Eventually they can be out in full sun, but they need time to adapt to it. More generally, this is a case of needing "hardening off" for the transition.


6

They do look very much like Gasteraloe beguinii


5

Bamboo is right that generally you do need roots to replant an aloe vera pup, but anecdotally I know people who say they've been successful replanting a rootless pup. You've already got the pup and the soil, so I'd keep going with it. The coir is fine as a planting medium, but I disagree with the advice to dry it out. For the plant to root, it will need to ...


5

If it is a true aloe vera, then it will eventually need a larger pot, because it will create "pups" (small offshoots) around its base, which will then grow to full size (maybe as tall as 18") and then produce pups of their own, which will then grow to full size... The smallest pot I'd try to keep a true aloe vera plant in would be a 12" (30 cm) pot. And ...


5

I have many times planted a broken off piece of aloe vera and had it root and grow on into a new plant. Find some sandy soil, water it well but let it drain completely, stick the stem of the broken off part into the soil and give it a couple or three weeks. Keep it in bright but not direct light, and water it sparingly. You can be pretty sure it has ...


5

A plant at my home servived for more than 5 years. This is how it looked after 5 years. Then I removed it from the hanging and planted it in the garden. https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipMEHK4oPPcXhBfX0apNcnBb_US-RiWbvXJC2Tguzqp2tFyoxtQmPjmShitrz0UoEA?key=MDVqbXNqYlVLd1VjR1VPTlBob3dnUXM4dmc4TDh3


5

Succulents do not 'heal' in the traditional sense from cracks or tears. Leave it be, unless it is starting to rot, and hopefully the plant will continue to grow and a new leaf will come up. You could trim the damaged leaf at the stem, but this is not necessary and will just turn brown.


5

I would just leave it. This happens in the wild and plants are fine. It looks like a fairly new/small plant so pruning that much leaf structure might do more harm than good. If it's lacking support or if the leaf is pulling apart because of it's own weight then you could prop it up or tie a string around the plant to keep the leaves from falling.


5

That is indeed a member of the aloe family. As others have said, there are hundreds of types. A good list is provided here. I don't know enough to narrow it down. A Google search brings up pictures which may be helpful. This site about identification, care, and uses for aloe has a picture that looks similar to yours. Aloe is easy to care for, and can live ...


5

Possibly Aloe vera var. chinensis. There's a photo here: http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/272091/#b


5

From what I see here, your Aloe gets too much water for the sun it get. Aloe Vera leaves in very hot, sunny places (often sandy). e.g. already discussed here. It goes for the sun (phototropism) because it doesn't have enough. That explains the long thing leaves we see on your plant. Result of frequent watering, lots of water is pumped into the leaves, ...


5

The aloe vera is a succulent which stores water in its leaves. It does better with a freely draining potting mix such as a cactus potting mix, or regular mix amended with perlite. It's drooping because the roots have now been compromised sitting in both the wrong mix and a pot lacking drainage. I'd suggest you remove it from the pot, remove any rotted ...


5

You're having a flower! Aloe do indeed flower. It depends on plant maturity, treatment, sunshine, etc. It sounds like you're treating it well. It's not an Aloe vera (barbadensis), it's some other species. I'm more of an aloe generalist, so I won't guess at the correct ID.


5

You were pretty close when you described the "thing" as a bean, because like a bean, it's a seedpod - your aloe was pollinated and has set seeds in three pods. You could let the pods dry - when ripe, they should open up a little. At that point, you could carefully pick them and collect the seeds to plant in other pots or cells. If I remember ...


4

Use a cactus mix for aloes. This is basically to simulate desert conditions somewhat, with coarse mineral soil that has excellent drainage. A good mix is: 2 parts sharp sand 2 parts coir 1 part pumice (for airiness) Or any other wide range of ingredient mixes. That's just one I've used in the past, and it worked well. The hardest part of the process was ...


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