15

That is called Pleiospilos nelii. It's a succulent, and a member of the same family as Lithops (Aizoaceae), but it's not a Lithop. It is a leaf window plant, like Lithops. They make a yellow-orange daisy-like flower in the early spring. Definitely from S. Africa, not Asia. The dots are windows that let sunlight in to the interior of the plant. Fairly ...


13

They look to be aphids. You can squish them with a pinch of your thumb and forefinger (you do not need to squeeze so hard as to crush the leaf). Repeat every time you see them, until you don't see them anymore. They are also easily jetted off with a spray from a garden hose, but I doubt you want to do this with an indoor plant. Most insecticides, including ...


11

There is no "exact" answer to this question, but it appears you already know the minimum it can last without water by your own unintended experiment. Though not a perfect answer, I hope the following can help you out. Succulents need water - it's commonly known (almost to the point of being an exaggerated myth) that succulents and cacti need very little ...


9

Agreed, its an aphid infestation, specifically what's known as Oleander Aphid, which affects plants in the Apocynaceae family (which Adenium belongs to) as well as Asclepiadaceae - more info in the link below, if you really want to know about it in detail, but if you've got neem or horticultural oil as a spray, that should work in getting rid of them. I ...


9

It's Kalanchoe blossfeldiana. It's a succulent native to Madagascar. They are pretty undemanding houseplants, but need good light and mustn't be over-watered: allow the soil to dry fully between watering and do not leave it sitting in water.


8

I'd hazard an educated guess at bad growing conditions - it looks as if this plant is in a pot, which presumably has drainage holes, sitting inside an outer container which probably does not. Succulents like to be kept on the dry side, preferring well drained conditions - if you've watered that too often, and not emptied the outer pot of all water twice ...


8

This plant is an aloe. It's a desert dwelling succulent. In warm weather they can handle being watered once a month, sometimes more often in HOT weather. Indoors they can often go several months without water before they complain. If they're watered frequently they start to suffer from drowning and root rot very quickly. The lower leaves of your plant appear ...


8

First, here is what sunburn looks like on an aloe leaf: And here is what etiolation looks like on an aloe (this one's actually mine :o): Mine is etiolated because it's in the basement under fluorescent lighting, which is on 24/7. That plus the warm temperatures are confusing to the plant. Mine responded by trying to grow (although I haven't watered it ...


8

This is fairly normal behavior for these plants. As they grow, the stems get longer, and since the leaves are full of water, the weight of the top of the plant pulls the stem over to one side. It's not really indicative of a problem, but it can be a little annoying. You've got a couple of options as I see it: You can get a heavy, possibly ceramic pot ...


8

We say a plant is 'etiolated' when its growth becomes long and lanky, usually thin and weak looking, often yellowish or pale in colour, and with elongated gaps between leaves on stems, although this latter is not applicable to your particular plant. Your plant (Euphorbia enopla gets my vote for ID) is looking very healthy. From what you say, you are keeping ...


8

It reminds me of a Night Blooming Cereus. I've never grown one, so can't comment on their need. My folks have theirs growing in normal household conditions, getting western light. They are amazing plants - sending up fragrant blooms that last a single night. This page seems to offer a decent overview.


8

First, I missed off a bit of this particular one's proper name - it's Sansevieria trifasciata laurentii; the version without yellow stripes is just Sansevieria trifasciata. My houseplant book says to only re-pot when the pot it's in starts to bulge - then you can either pot into something larger or divide the plant in two and pot the sections separately. ...


8

The damaged leaves will not heal, and the weakened narrow portion of stem will remain that way. It can grow from the end, though, and that can be healthy. It was obviously suffering from etiolation. I think the best method of action starts with repotting the aloe. Use a free draining cactus mix, and a free draining pot. You can repot the pups in separate ...


7

This looks like anthracnose to me. The picture shows some typical symptoms: no yellowing leaves round sunken areas that are not soft or rotting but look brown, even bark like anthracnose is also common in Australia in many major crops such as mangos, olives, lupins, avocados, pistachios Treatment easy way: cut the diseased tissue off with a knife or ...


7

In the case of the aloe (plant on the right) it's because trying to root aloe from cuttings is different from most and might involve a little luck. Most places I've read say that it just won't root from a cutting, instead it rots like yours has. Usually Aloe plants are propagated from the smaller plants that sprout off the side of the main plant (called pups)...


7

I don't know of a really good dichotomous key or similar... what I would do, is to learn the basics of most commonly kept succulents, then look at pictures of those families to see if you can narrow it to genera... main families of succulents (at least house plants) Cactuses (Cactaceae): almost all have leaves modified as woody spines... majority of the ...


7

Well, that's such a coincidence - this is the second question on this particular plant today. It's Sansevieria cylindrica - confirmation of ID can be achieved once the flowers are fully out. Your specimen is getting enough light and is growing well - this particular variety of Sansevieria does appreciate much brighter daylight than other varieties, and it ...


7

Well I wouldn't worry about drying it out first - simply tip it out of its pot, preferably wearing gloves, carefully, and with any luck, most of the wet soil will fall off immediately anyway. The plant appears to be quite small for the size pot its in, so its unlikely to be full of roots. They're quite forgiving of being potted on, but have a pot and your ...


7

The cause is usually not enough light, or the light is very directional (for example if the pot is near a window). The remedy is to turn the pot regularly (i.e. every day or two) to keep the plant growing straight. You can't "straighten out" a plant that has grown as twisted as your picture, though. Best to start again from cuttings, as in the other answer. ...


7

It is Plectranthus tomentosa, sometimes called the Vicks plant because it smells a bit like Vick mentho rub, or of menthol/eucalyptus anyway. Some cultural info about this plant here, if you need it http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/123089/#b


7

This plant is not a Crassula! It is a Portulacaria afra, commonly called Spekboom or Elephant Bush in South Africa, which is where it originates. It is extremely drought tolerant, but can also grow quite fast and very lush under kinder conditions. In Adelaide, Australia (where I live) you can plant it in your garden as long as the soil drains well in the ...


7

That's a Crassula ovata: the leaves are more elongated (ovata = "egg-shaped") and larger than Portulacaria afra. Also, they are missing the indentation at the tip that makes Portulacaria afra leaves heart-shaped. The growth of Crassula is "stockier" and the branches are smooth. Find a picture of a Portulacaria in this question for comparison. The white "...


7

Looks like over watering. The soil itself looks wet to me. The elephant's ear, like all other Jades, can use very little water, so you can usually just stick to weekly or even two-weekly watering schedules. This is a very resilient plant, so if this is the first time it happened, just let the soil dry and then water later. If the leaves fall off repeatedly ...


7

Like many plants, Jade plant stems are comprised of 'nodes and internodes' (the nodes containing the concentrated meristem tissue): The nodes hold one or more leaves, as well as buds which can grow into branches (with leaves, conifer cones, or inflorescences (flowers)). Adventitious roots may also be produced from the nodes. The internodes distance one ...


6

Water. Too much water. It's soaked it all up and is rotting. Succulents kept indoors should be left unwatered and in the best sunlight available. You should really only water once a month or "eyeball it". When the plant starts to shrivel a bit, that's when it needs water. succulents store water in their leaves. They will literally use it up before ...


6

Most succulents require a lot of sunshine. However, there are many that don't mind some shade. Grassland succulents are characterized by extremely long flower stalks that are meant to shoot up above grass. So the plants with long flowerstems are more tolerant of lower light. Plants like Gasteria and Haworthia will grow well on windowsills. The only ...


6

This plant is Haworthia attenuata var. radula – Hankey Dwarf Aloe or one of it's cultivars. A native of South Africa it is stemless and propagated by removing small offsets that grow out from the base. This plant looks very similar to Aloe aristata and definitive identification depends on examining a more mature specimen.


6

Yes, they will root if you put them into a very sandy, free-draining mix kept slightly damp at all times, preferably with bottom heat, but if that's not possible, keep it in a warm, bright place. Light is essential, but extremely intense light at this time may dry out the pad. You won't have this issue during winter, as the sun is low in intensity. The ...


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