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12

I haven't seen any single book that provides all of the information you're looking for, but you can get most of what you want with a small collection of reference guides. The Garden Primer by Barbara Damrosch has broad coverage of plants commonly found in North American yards: from vegetables and small fruit to bulbs, shrubs, and trees (both shade and ...


11

You can just buy a clove of garlic from the store. No need to freeze it. Just break apart the cloves and plant them. They will grow indoors but require the much higher light levels that outdoors has. If you do not provide the light levels that usually come with High Pressure Sodium or other indoor hydroponic lighting then their "growth" will be using up ...


10

I would suggest: Lack of sunlight I notice it's right next to a fence corner and suspect there's not enough sunlight getting through to this one for it to thrive. I'm not sure what to suggest as a solution for that. Possible magnesium deficiency (pretty common in Australian citrus trees) or some other mineral deficiency in soil I also notice, on close ...


10

If all you want is a tall plant, and it doesn't matter whether its bushy, well grown and attractive, put it in low light levels - it'll suffer what's known as etiolation, meaning the stems gets longer and weaker and paler, and the spaces between the leaves are greater up the stem. It won't look at all well, but it will be taller. Other methods - turn it out ...


9

Chives are one of the easiest herbs to grow and are trouble free unless you grow onions close by. The onion fly will attack most members of the onion family of which the chive is a member. What are ideal conditions for germination? Soil less mix, moisture, light, bottom heat, moderate to high humidity to start germination with more air movement after ...


9

I can think of a couple of possible issues that could cause otherwise healthy carrots to not grow well or to appear not to be growing well. One, carrots prefer cooler temperatures for maximum growth. Not cold, but cooler as it is in the spring and early fall. If it is hot where you are right now, they may simply be "on pause" while they wait for better ...


9

You don't plant the whole bulb, but split them into cloves, and plant each of the cloves separately. Each clove will develop a new bulb that will be oriented correctly. I doubt it matters if the tapered end of the clove is pointed up or laterally since the stored mass is used to grow the new leaves which then create the new bulb. However, if you plant the ...


8

Your sweet potato is very special. It has a disorder of unknown cause called fasciation. From Sweetpotato: Major Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Disorders (1997) by T. Ames, N.E.J.M. Smit, A.R. Braun, J.N. O’Sullivan, and L.G. Skoglund, page 112: Fasciation Cause unknown Symptoms. Vines become very broad and flattened—fasciated. This symptom ...


8

The time you spend in preparation is as, or more, important than post planting time. site location, cedars like access to water, not soggy and not dry some shade is fine and full sun is tolerated if the soil is not too dry a wide variety of soil types but I would avoid very sandy soils or soils low in organic matter protection from winter winds. Cedars that ...


8

Having seen the picture, your ginger plant has grown so tall because it's not getting enough light. The condition it's in is known as 'etiolated', which means it's lanky, with a thin weak stem and long gaps between leaves. Even if you reduce the height, its unlikely to produce more normal growth unless you can improve light conditions. UPDATE: Even a ...


8

Well, technically, yes. You should always give them their first growing season free of fruiting. This encourages the plant to become more established than if you (like me) let them fruit the first year. Even if they grow roots in the fall, and some more in the spring, that's not the same as being established. It gives them a good head start to plant them in ...


8

I would not recommend it, but I think you should ask this question in your siste site: https://parenting.stackexchange.com/. The problem I find with this "gifts": these are very very slow to grow (so very boring for a children) very difficult to see a live trap of fly (or a digestion of I fly). IIRC two per year should be enough for the plant. It is ...


8

This is a very open question, and I like to see other answers. As you wrote, variety is the main driver. Cold weather and dry soil could stop the growth of a tomato. Position is also a determinant. Usually you have several tomatoes on a stem, so the first being pollinates will have some advantage and take more resource than other tomatoes. But varieties ...


8

Interesting question. There are definitely ways to speed up growth, like fine-tuning soil for optimal growth. For example taking the time to test soil and amend it with any deficient macro- or micro-nutrients would improve forest/tree growth. There will probably be trade-offs in environmental benefits trees that are "rushed". The tree quality itself may or ...


7

Well, for root crops, you need a substrate, and of suffient depth, to support the roots. Root crops are very nicely grown in an "ebb and flow" system. This set up alternately floods and drains the growing media on cycles. The cycle times are matched to the rate of development of the plants so they have enough water, but enough air-time for the roots as well. ...


7

Annual means that the plant has a full life cycle (seed-to-seed cycle) in at most one year. It will germinate, bloom and die that year. This is not a calendar year per se. Some species germinate in autumn, survive through the winter and bloom next spring. A good example is the French Marigold. A biennial plant takes two years to complete it's life cycle. ...


7

That is called pollarding. It is a pruning system that promotes uniform yearly growth, in dense heads over the tree. You basically cut the branch ends at a certain diameter, and remove all smaller growth. Then on a yearly to almost a 20 year basis, remove the shoots that form, at the base. the result is the formation of these clublike heads, which grow in ...


7

Unlikely to recover - not impossible, but unlikely, and waiting to see if there's any regrowth will take some time. Given you might want some basil between now and Christmas, its probably best to get another plant. And instruct your wife to always leave some leaves on the plant next time... or buy two plants so its easier to leave some leaves in place and ...


7

Some of the large tropical bamboos will put out new growth at a rate of 3' a day (about 1" every 40 minutes),1 which when it is a stalk diameter of over 8-10" is really rather impressive (eventually reaching over 100' in height). They can do this because of their huge, aggressive rhizome system. The new stalks come up like an asparagus stalk, then stretch ...


7

I think duckweed may take the prize for daily increase (of course, it's aquatic, and individually tiny - but it grows like mad.) Then again, possibly algae of some sort do better. Kelp or bamboo win in the "linear growth per day" sort of sweepstakes. With bamboo, it very much depends on the day, though. Giant sequoia presumably win the "seed to plant mass"...


7

Some people put their garlic in the fridge for about 2 weeks. You aim to get a temperature of about 4 - 6 deg Celcius, so your fridge might not be cold enough. Some people have reported that garlic stored in the freezer sprouts just fine. It may be that they used hard neck varieties which are more suited to the cold since they originated in the cold ...


7

Well it depends on what you want. If you are going to harvest it later on then you probably want to plant them mostly straight up and down. If you aren't harvesting, it'll probably grow just fine and new cloves and divisions will likely to grow straight.


7

It matters. Not in the "critical and you won't get garlic" sense, but you will get weird misshapen garlic if they are not base down, tip up. Not my picture, but I've grown these, and it's due to mis-oriented cloves at planting time. Here are some sideways examples:


7

Nothing lasts forever.The term perennial simply means a plant that will last for more than 2 years. That can mean 3 years that can mean 50 years or more. As the plants age they can lose their ability to produce the same quantity or quality of fruit. Perennials don't live forever. They do eventually die or lose their ability to produce. For example ...


7

There isn't a way to force plant growth any faster than it's programmed to be either organically or inorganically. What you can do, though, is provide optimum growing conditions for whatever plant it is, which will give the healthiest plants with the best growth rate possible. This means providing fertile, healthy soil which has been improved regularly with ...


6

You may get other advice from others, but a good start is to pick them when they are ripe enough and big enough to eat. A pepper will not set as many fruit if it already has a lot of fruit. I haven't grown the Thai and Jolokia types, but generally hotter peppers prefer hotter weather. I've tried the Italian style (like Red Marconi) but had mixed success in ...


6

I get the same problem with my lupines every year and about this time I harvest the seeds and cut them back. They always grow back and often I get some flowers again in September. I cut mine last week. That was the end of the first week of July. Good luck.


6

"Soil-less" doesn't necessarily mean "liquid", though I often think liquid when I hear hydroponics. See, for example, this page on growing hydroponic carrots: Medium hydroponics systems require a physical substance for the vegetables to grow in (in this instance, perlite), whereas solution hydroponics systems only require a liquid nutrient solution. ...


6

Soil pH affects the availability of nutrients to plants. At values outside the range of about 5-7, certain nutrients become unavailable to plants. (The Wikipedia article gets into more of the details of the chemistry, which are somewhat outside the scope of this site.) For most plants in a home garden or landscape, you want to target a pH of about 6.0-6.5. ...


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