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14

A healthy strawberry runner is considered to be a "new" plant. Many of the long-term strawberry beds I've read about use runners as a way of renewing the beds every year or every other year, and as a result, the bed itself produces for quite a long time. To maintain the quality and productivity of the berry patch, the planting must be renovated each ...


12

It sounds as though you aren't keeping the cutting in a humidity tent. In other words, I think your basic problem is desiccation of the cutting. I've found it convenient to root cuttings in one gallon containers - 1 gallon zip lock bags fit snugly over the top. People frequently make little terrariums by cutting the bottom off 1 liter soft drink plastic ...


10

My experience is different. It is very easy to have a apple tree from seed. But apple trees are not auto-fertile. This mean that to have apple on a tree, you need pollen from an other trees (and other varieties). There are tables about which varieties could pollinate which other variety, so different variety is not always enough. To complicate things, you ...


9

That's a pretty prolific plant. You should have no trouble propagating it from cuttings, but… you have to select the right growth stage to cut from. You should only root from the newer (but not too new) growth. The best time is late spring to early summer when the newer growth is just starting to become woody. Cut sections of about 6-12" and strip ...


9

Mint is typically propagated, as you correctly say, by runners (or stolons). Stolons are longish horizontal parts of the stem that can either grow along the surface or underground and connect two vertical stems. Here's a picture of a mint stolon from this site (I'll replace this with pictures from my plant when I get the time). It's the stolons that have ...


8

About half an inch to an inch is sufficient - you don't want them much longer than that because its harder to pot them without damage, and once roots start appearing, its surprising how fast they grow. Try not to damage them when transferring to a soil medium - make a hole large enough to accommodate the rootlets without squashing or bending them, and gently ...


8

I cannot answer the detailed questions, but put the cuttings in a plastic zip-top bag with a few bits of damp paper/cardboard/sphagnum moss/etc. - seal it tightly, but leave as much air inside as is practical if they are leafed. It isn't essential, but the longer you can keep them refrigerated until you can strike them, the better. Also, if you have 3% ...


8

I believe you are simply over watering the baby plant, or the soil you are using does not provide enough drainage. But there are a few ways we can work around that problem. A Quick Background on Spider Plant Propagation I can think of few things easier to propagate than a spider plant. Those little baby spiders hanging from the flower stalks (stolen) are ...


7

Willow water could contain an unusually high amount of "phyto-hormones", which support the growth of roots. I think this will be an auxine-derivate, which the willow contains. Clear water doesn't contain those phyto-hormones. So plant and root-growth comes from the cuttings themselves. However, I'm not 100% sure. Conventional rooting hormones containing ...


7

Cut a little stem and pinch off the bottom set of leaves. Then place in a clear glass. Roots should start to form in about 4 days.


7

The type of cutting you are talking about is mostly likely called a truncheon. Some trees will grow from this kind of cutting VERY well. Others not so well or not at all. A truncheon is usually a 3 foot long stem or branch as thick as your forearm. You denude the truncheon, then let is season for a day or two in the shade so the ends dry out (necessary to ...


7

I assume you're talking about rooting plants in soil. I'll describe the system I like to use, and tell you how I generally decide when they have roots. I imagine the way to tell may differ slightly depending on your rooting system, which is why I'm explaining mine. I pot the cutting in fresh seed-starting mix. I add a granulated 7-7-7 fertilizer and ...


7

In the case of the aloe (plant on the right) it's because trying to root aloe from cuttings is different from most and might involve a little luck. Most places I've read say that it just won't root from a cutting, instead it rots like yours has. Usually Aloe plants are propagated from the smaller plants that sprout off the side of the main plant (called pups)...


7

Lots of fancy grasses are sold commercially as plugs. To harvest them they use what looks like a lawn aerator but about 1" to 1.5" in diameter. To cut plugs like for your purpose you need to make a tool. I would try this: Take a shovel and cut off the blade about 4" down from the foot rests. Take a chunk of electrical conduit about 8" long by 1" to 1.5"...


7

Actually, I was in a similar situation a few weeks ago: A friend gave me an aloe crown that looked exactly like yours (i.e. slightly dry stem, no roots). What worked for me was to simply plant it into a pot with a mix of normal potting soil and some sand, water it and wait. It seems to have rooted quickly, at least it already started growing one or two new ...


7

Ajuga is fairly shallow rooted. You should be able to take a sharp spade and cut out 6" wide squares. Plant in the new area. Top dress where you made the cut and then stand back, way back as it spreads even more. I too have found Lamium does not deserve it's reputation as a good groundcover in Ontario. Summers are too hot and the soil gets too dry. It ...


7

Grind isn't the word I would use. More like split. What you want to do is dig up the plant. You dig 6-8 inches deep all the way around, then pry the plant up out of the ground. If the plant is relatively old, this may be difficult as the roots can get very tough and wooden. Once you have the plant uprooted, you split the root mass. You want to have one to ...


7

The term you need is actually 'vegetatively propagated' rather than 'cloned'. The answer is, essentially, yes, by and large, almost all plants can be vegetatively propagated, though different parts of the plant may be used and the methods used will vary, along with the level of difficulty. Parts which can be used include leaves, stems, shoots, bulbs, ...


7

From personal experience, I'd disagree with the statement that rooting hormones are ineffective, but it depends what you're using it for. I prefer the powder formulation to gels or liquids because there seems to be less chance of rot with the powder, and it has a longer shelf life, but essentially, rooting hormone preparations contain a chemical formula that,...


7

This is definitively a Yucca elephantipes. Not Dracaena. It is indeed an air root coming out of it. However, this plant is one of the easiest to propagate, you can just cut of the top of the stem or your rooted shoot and put it in the ground. No hormones or sterile soil needed. Also without these air roots it will work out fine, just make the soil not too ...


6

It depends what comes out as fruit and also the cross. If you get an heirloom variety it will come out the same. If it is a F1 cross you have a chance of getting some recessive traits or some good traits from the parent. Growing from seeds and selecting out healthy plants is good for improving the plant variety for your conditions.


6

Symphytum officinale (Consolida maggiore - Borragine maggiore) Being hardy plants, they can be used in gardening to fill easily unimportant or secluded areas. But as well as plants that self sow, easily become invasive and, being very deep, root system are difficult to eradicate. In the basement are also always a few small fragments of root are still ...


6

When taking cuttings from a plant, I try not to take more than 1/3 of the current healthy growth. For some plants, you shouldn't take even that much. As has been mentioned, mint is very prolific and a fast grower, so you should be just fine taking around 1/3 of the currently growing, healthy young branches each time you cut. Also, mint can be propagated ...


6

It's a Chlorophytum comosum, commonly known as Spider Plant. It's not a 'hydroponic' plant though - the fact that it survives in water when you're getting it to grow roots is true of many plants. It will, though, prefer to be potted up into a growing medium eventually.


6

Different seeds take different amounts of time to come up. Also, some of the seeds you planted may require more warmth than you are providing - the basil, for example. I'd put the containers in a warmer spot if possible, and give them more light as well for the sprouts you already have (as you can see, your rocket is not getting enough light, that is why ...


6

Yes, different seeds require different treatment. Some seeds require warm soil, some cool soil. Some seeds need to be covered, some cannot be covered and need light to germinate. What is the temperature of your soil? Most seeds need some soil warmth but do not need light until they have germinated, however, that is not a rule for all seeds. My first ...


6

Liriope muscari is rather challenging to grow from seed. For one thing, the pulp contains phenolic compounds which inhibit germination, so the seeds must be cleaned well before use. Seeds also have a morphological dormancy because the embryo is not fully developed when the fruit ripens, so a period of warm stratification is required to complete maturation. ...


6

Yes, they will root if you put them into a very sandy, free-draining mix kept slightly damp at all times, preferably with bottom heat, but if that's not possible, keep it in a warm, bright place. Light is essential, but extremely intense light at this time may dry out the pad. You won't have this issue during winter, as the sun is low in intensity. The ...


6

It depends. I'm currently grown some philodendron vines in water for propagation purposes. They will stay in water for a long time with no ill effect. However, I believe that all the plants growing is coming from it's own energy stores. Eventually those will run out. You'll need to replace those. Whether that's in dirt or water is up to you. I'm sure you ...


6

This is my kiddie pool sub irrigation planter with a couple of dismal looking tomato plants, and one bag with 4 corn and one Apple tree seedling. I probably over did it! Two of the corn look very weak. What I've observed, apart from the mosquitoes breeding in the water, is that the roots grow into the water which is well oxygenated. So, they don't prune ...


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