16

This is a situation where a net might be the best option. Put it on stakes to hold it over the plants, and arrange it so it can be easily lifted or pulled aside for harvesting. make sure the net touches the ground so squirrels can't get underneath. This spring I made little teepees of chicken wire to keep them off my yucca seedlings. You will want something ...


15

Here's an idea that makes a lot of short term work but has paid off for me in the long run. Add a water feature with some shallow (1" to 2" deep) areas. You will attract birds, frogs and toads who will assist in keeping the slug population low. This does not eliminate all slugs, just some of them. And, it takes time for the word to get out that your ...


15

Can you take the plant outside? And do you have access to an outside hose? If your answer is a "yes" to both of the above questions, a hose nozzle that delivers a sharp stream of water offers a very! effective method. When using this method, make sure you take your time and blast the whole plant (eg underside of the leaves). After doing that, I would then ...


14

I sprinkle cayenne pepper on the fruits and around the base of the plant, and this seems to keep the squirrels away. Cayenne is also available as a "hot pepper wax spray" which may also work.


13

You've got a bad infestation of fig wax scale. The ants are there for the honeydew, and are ant-farming. You want to get rid of the scale, they're basically living off of your plant, using up resources. If it's a small plant, you can use a pen or other pointy thing and pop as many off as you can, onto a small drop-cloth, to be destroyed. The rest can be ...


13

They look to be aphids. You can squish them with a pinch of your thumb and forefinger (you do not need to squeeze so hard as to crush the leaf). Repeat every time you see them, until you don't see them anymore. They are also easily jetted off with a spray from a garden hose, but I doubt you want to do this with an indoor plant. Most insecticides, including ...


12

Below are a few other options you may wish to look into: "Scarecrow Motion-Activated Sprinkler" system. "Ultrasonic Motion-Activated" system. Liquid ammonia poured into a few small dishes (I use screw-top jam lids) and placed in areas you wish to discourage cats from frequenting is effective. I only use this method in areas away from the house due to the ...


12

I think I would go with winwaed's answer, but if you find out the culprit is a slightly bigger creature, I might then be tempted to look into getting a "Scarecrow Motion-Activated Sprinkler" system (like this one) to humanely scare away the hungry creatures...


12

IMHO that answer should work fine in your situation. It's a pretty "standard" procedure for dealing with such pests on potted plants. Submerging the pot in water for an hour or two, then allowing it to dry out will not have any adverse effects on your Basil plant (or any other "common" potted plant I can think of). It's not like you're keeping the roots ...


12

Generic, non-chemical pest controls that you can try: Physical barriers like row covers. Traps -- some traps use pheromones to lure the insects in and then trap them with glue or sticky tape. Vacuuming is effective on some insects. Trap crops will sometimes work -- you plant a species that the pests like even more than the crop you want to harvest. The ...


12

When the corn is about 1-2 weeks from being ready for human consumption put a battery powered radio tuned to an all night talk radio station in your corn patch. Music does not work. The raccoons will avoid the "humans" for a while. You have to time this carefully to your corn crop because after a couple of weeks the 'coons will figure that those voices ...


12

That looks like the worst case of scale I've ever seen. Are the tops of the leaves sticky, and is there more of it on the central rib of each leaf (top and/or bottom)? If so, that pretty much clinches it. Yes, you definitely need to treat it. You'll find some advice here, but maybe someone has better advice for such a horrible infestation. What I would ...


12

Many people plant marigolds (Calendula officinalis, not the French marigold, Tagetes) as a 'trap' crop, but the 'trap' attracts aphids, particularly blackfly. The theory is, if the blackfly inhabit the marigolds, they won't inhabit your roses or whatever it is you're trying to protect. In my experience, blackfly do love marigolds - not quite as much as they ...


11

Fortunately, I have never had to do battle with millipedes, so I can't suggest a remedy based on personal experience. However, a quick online search has come up with this article which suggests the following control measures: Remove as much garden debris as possible, since this is an ideal breeding ground for them Drench the soil where they are with an ...


11

Snakes generally hang out where they can find food and shelter. To discourage them, you need to remove both incentives. Blocking out the porch is a good first step. You also need to remove any brush or wood piles, or anything in the yard that looks like a home to a snake. If you have a fence, keeping the grass cut short around it is a good idea. If you ...


11

I'd be very surprised if its actually rats eating your plants - rats will eat almost anything, but plants would be the last thing on the list, unless its a fruiting vegetable plant such as corn. You may have rats coming to check out the balcony, especially if, at any time, you've eaten out there or left other foodstuffs lying around, including things like ...


10

The problem is the mulch - cats like anything that's loose and which they can scratch and move around easily, so freshly dug soil, mulch, pea shingle, anything like that is the equivalent of cat litter so far as they're concerned. The best mulch to use to discourage cats is probably coca shell, if that's available - that has a habit of 'bonding' together to ...


10

This year I have had such a problem. I am having partial success with "Ultrasonic Motion-Activated" system as proposed by Mike Perry. By partial I mean that the cats seem to stop pooping in the places where the system is installed, but move to other "corners" of the garden. I have moved the machine 3 times for now, the cats haven't yet returned to the ...


10

Q. Are you 100% sure it's millipedes causing the "real" damage? Could it instead be something like cutworms causing the "real" damage and the millipedes are just feasting on the remains? To check if you're dealing with millepedes (which tend to be dark in colour), squash one, if there is a strong "stinky" smell after doing so, then you have millipedes. Q. ...


10

"SE Gardening" contains quite a bit of information on this subject, below I've tried to gather up some of that information and post it here in one place for easy reference. All links are to "SE Gardening" posts unless noted otherwise. Improve your soil, keep your soil in good health I'm a huge! believer in the benefits (almost magical properties) of ...


10

I have only ever noticed pill bugs feasting on stuff that is piling up and rotting as they usually don't come out into the air or sunshine. So I would be interested to know if you have enough space between plants and if you are leaving food (rotting leaves etc. piling up near plants). It seems strange that these guys would come out into the open to feed. I ...


10

You'll never get it completely flat before you use it, though it will tend to flatten over time. To get most of the curl out, unroll it "upside down" so that the wire on the end bites into the ground. Put a couple of cement blocks or something heavy on that end. Roll out the rest of the fence, putting weights on it wherever it wants to curl back up. Leave ...


10

Spiders eat meat (bugs), hence the web to trap them, and have no interest in eating plants. If you're seeing spiders, you probably have bugs that they're eating. If you remove the spiders, the bugs are free to eat the plants unencumbered. I would leave them. The caveat to this would be if the spider is a black widow, though its hard to imagine a black ...


10

It appears that earthworms will not be harmed by it. "Diatomaceous Earth will not harm warm-blooded animals or earthworms Earthworm farmers use it to treat their worm beds for parasites, fungus gnat larva etc. Earth worms are structurally different from insects in that they can actually digest particles of DE. The particles are then eliminated in their ...


10

Most spiders are friends to your garden, they eat insects, likely including pests you want gone. I can think of one true spider that you might not want getting cozy in your garden. Meet the Brown Recluse: That darker brown fiddle-shaped marking on the head is suggestive of the species. Their eyes are more distinctive, one pair at the center, two pairs to ...


9

Place clear plastic water bottles in your garden, half fill them with water so it can be seen there is water inside. Cats and dogs mostly will not poop there as it by instinct not to. Also, you can try putting sticks in your gardens, poking up! If there is no clear place to rest you bottom, then you will find another place where you can.


9

Shiny aluminum pie plates did the trick for me. The wind keeps them moving and the sunlight reflecting off them should keep the birds away. All you need to do is punch a hole in the plate and hang it from a branch.


9

These small, black insects which cluster together look like the blackfly that sometimes infest my broad beans. If they reappear after the water-blast treatment, I would spray them thoroughly with a solution of soapy water; it saves using chemicals, costs virtually nothing and works a treat. To my mind, always better to take the organic route if possible, ...


9

Yes, the same methods "should" work on both of them, slugs and snails belong to the same taxonomic class: Gastropods The Gastropoda or gastropods, more commonly known as snails and slugs. are a large taxonomic class within the Mollusca. The class Gastropoda includes snails and slugs of all kinds and all sizes from microscopic to quite large. There are ...


9

A quote from Golden Gate Gardener on the identification This happens because some mites enter the flower buds and start sucking out the sap. The ovary of the flower is misshapen, so the fruit is, well, outlandish. Citrus bud mite is apparently particularly a problem near the coast in our area, just where we depend on lemons for most of our garden citrus. ...


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