9

I'd say the stress of replanting is causing this non-growth. Small damages to roots and new type of soil. The seedlings need to recover. I'd be patient.


8

The reasoning behind this advice to only use the right sized pot is that if you put a very small plant into a large pot filled with potting medium, most of the medium (potting compost) will not be occupied by anything except bacteria and other life forms, some of which may not be desirable. The compost may 'sour' and become toxic to the plant, so if your ...


8

I believe you are simply over watering the baby plant, or the soil you are using does not provide enough drainage. But there are a few ways we can work around that problem. A Quick Background on Spider Plant Propagation I can think of few things easier to propagate than a spider plant. Those little baby spiders hanging from the flower stalks (stolen) are ...


7

In addition to the reasons Bamboo offered, some plants - like Jade plants - do better a little potbound. This means they like to have their roots crowded in the soil. Also, houseplants generally need to be replanted from time to time anyway - they aren't in a natural environment where new soil is being generated and worms and other critters are aerating the ...


7

I think there is no easy rules beyond knowing the size of the adult plant. However, there are rules that can help you know when you have to change the pot with a larger one. If you can see many roots coming out of the drainage holes of pots. If the soil dries out very soon. If the plant has stopped growing and you know for sure that can become larger. ...


7

Well I wouldn't worry about drying it out first - simply tip it out of its pot, preferably wearing gloves, carefully, and with any luck, most of the wet soil will fall off immediately anyway. The plant appears to be quite small for the size pot its in, so its unlikely to be full of roots. They're quite forgiving of being potted on, but have a pot and your ...


7

In theory, when you perform a transplant you should avoid damaging any of the roots at all, since any damage to roots causes the plant stress during transplant. In practice, you will always damage some small number of roots no matter how careful you are, unless you transplant a gigantic sized root-ball. So my answer to your question is you should move a root ...


6

It depends. I'm currently grown some philodendron vines in water for propagation purposes. They will stay in water for a long time with no ill effect. However, I believe that all the plants growing is coming from it's own energy stores. Eventually those will run out. You'll need to replace those. Whether that's in dirt or water is up to you. I'm sure you ...


6

I have no idea how you've managed to find only references that suggest this "scorched earth" approach to repotting - which is only appropriate (IMHO) when you are trying to salvage plants with soil disease issues (and not that great then - vegetative propagation from above the soil line is a path with greater chance of success in that case.) "Cleaning the ...


6

No, as Jaczjill says, you need to pot it again, this time making sure it's at the same level it was before. Those roots are used to being under the soil, and have a job to do - being exposed means they'll dry out at the very least.


6

These plants are Moth orchids or Phalaenopsis. They don't actually need soil as they are epiphytes. The air roots are a sign of a healthy plant. The plants have not been in the pot that long and can probably go a few more years. Your next pot should have a free draining mix including shredded bark. Your watering and fertilizer regime are working well as ...


6

The trouble with gardening is, ask a panel of experts a question and you'll get 3 different answers. I remember your original question on this plant and then, you believed you should wait for the peat soil it was in to dry out before attempting to repot in different soil. That wasn't true, and I don't think this latest thing is any more true either - when I ...


6

Here are some diagnostics but the best way is the first one: Once a year take the plant out of its pot. If all you see is roots circling around then cut an inch or two (2 - 4 cm) from the bottom of the root ball, add more soil to the pot and put the plant and root ball back in. Water thoroughly when watered the soil becomes dry quickly. Some water ...


6

Roots head for moisture not walls. If you want a plant with deep roots, you water deeply and allow to dry before watering again. This trains the roots to grow towards the water so it will have the ability to access water way below the surface, thus drought tolerant/resistant. The most important reason to maintain pot size to the plant size is water/...


6

These are good sized, healthy plants, and the pots aren't tiny either. The fern and the Ivy should be potted on into something larger, not least because the soil level is too high in the pot - it should be just shy of half an inch below the top. The Haworthia is fine in the pot's its got - hard to tell for sure about the others, particularly the one in the ...


5

The first two answers tell you most everything you need to know, but from reading your question, you seem to be asking, if you could work out what size pot the plant will eventually need, you could maybe use that initially. The reason you don't is that you'll have a small rootball (presumably) surrounded by a large area of compost which will be more or ...


5

Firstly, this varies so much between different species that you could almost ask a separate question for each one (for instance, most cacti like abnormally tiny pots, while most vegetables like huge pots) but there are some good 'rules of thumb' you might like to know. First, pots generally come in sizes, and you generally want to go one size up when ...


5

What happens if I leave it as-is? Your roots may get infected, that would ruin health of your plant. Also, insects\ants can start feeding on roots. Will the plant adapt? No. At least not this instance (your tree). You would be knowing that adapting to change of environment is ongoing process, may be if all the palm trees are treated like this, may be ...


5

Just take the time to re-pot it, however beware over-working the palm's especially sensitive root ball. Palm tree roots are especially sensitive (to direct fertilization, as well as transplant shock).


5

The rationale is simply to allay as much chance for rot as possible. Succulents in particular are susceptible to rot and newly-broken roots from them, especially so. Also, it's purported that the dry soil will encourage new root growth, strengthening the plant. I would suggest that if there is any major breakage of any thick, fleshy roots, that any broken ...


5

First, I am not sure I follow you all the way. This was the best plant, and already had the yellow leaves when you got it yesterday? I would not have made that choice, if this was indeed the case. Have you been watering profusely, or do you suspect the nursery did? Is the soil wet to touch? It also appears to have a clayey nature to it, and you should try ...


5

The reasoning behind this advice to only use the right sized pot is that if you put a very small plant into a large pot filled with potting medium, most of the medium (potting compost) will not be occupied by anything except bacteria and other life forms, some of which may not be desirable. The potting medium also may become 'sour' because, if the rootball ...


5

If it has no roots at all, then it cannot support any topgrowth, which is why its all dying back. At this stage, without roots, photosynthesis for the leaves is not something that's necessary in any way, the critical thing is to get the cane to generate new roots. Remove the top growth completely, leaving just the woody 'cane' like parts of the plant, ...


5

One of the most beautiful spider plants I've ever seen! And that is saying something because in my day every hippie had a spider plant, even those in a store aren't as beautiful. Good job! If you have just repotted this plant then this is easy. On the side you want the plant to move to be more vertical, simply press the soil down on that side. Help your ...


5

From what I see here, your Aloe gets too much water for the sun it get. Aloe Vera leaves in very hot, sunny places (often sandy). e.g. already discussed here. It goes for the sun (phototropism) because it doesn't have enough. That explains the long thing leaves we see on your plant. Result of frequent watering, lots of water is pumped into the leaves, ...


5

Usually plants are pre-grown in small (cheap) pots and the soil is exhausted when sold to the customers (you in this case). So putting new bought plants in a larger pot is always a good idea. Waiting for signs to appear is a bit too late if you ask me, preventing these symptoms is always better them curing them.


4

I don't know where to start. Do you use this as an indoor Bonsai? Where do you live? First of all you can't use that substrate if you don't use a special fertilizer. Then you can't cut the roots of a tree when it should have a winter break. And after that put him into literally rocks and water. You need to put that tree into your garden, bury it so the ...


4

No, rearranging the roots won't do much for them. You can do one of two things. You can either repot them and trim any roots that won't fit, or repot them in a larger pot. If you choose to keep them in the same pot, which is fine, you need to prune the roots so that they could potentially fit into the pot without bending and not touch the sides of the pot. ...


4

The theory behind not watering immediately after repotting is that you are inducing the roots to grow a little more vigorously to search for water and therefore 'rooting the plant in'. I personally find the with enough care whilst transplanting, I.e. Spreading the roots, making sure there are no air pockets in the substrate, etc. You will have a decent ...


4

It is not something you would do with any plants other than, possibly, succulents - none of the other plants like roses or herbaceous perennials or shrubs appreciate their roots being exposed to air for any length of time at all.


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