32

The oxygen explanation regarding plants in standing water is too simplistic. When you root cuttings in plain water, there's nothing else in there compared to what's in soil. Your cuttings may take up to six weeks to root, and in that time, you may top up the water with more clean water occasionally to keep the base of the cutting in the water, while it ...


22

Well, basically, the perched table is the saturation point, where the capillary action in the soil is canceled out by the force of gravity. Every type of growing media has a different perched table. Capillary action will pull water up from a certain point, and below that point, gravity keeps the water from moving up. The size of the container does not affect ...


16

Tray watering is the standard way of watering plants so that the soil surface is not damaged. The water is poured in at the bottom - so no damage, and then soaks up through the soil. The seedlings will need to be in a shallow tray for this to work (it won't work with a deep pot unless the plants have a good root structure). For my pepper seedlings, use the ...


15

Spoiled wine is sometimes converted to vinegar through spoilage. Vinegar is a herbicide. If it's not vinegar and simply "off" tasting, it will still contain between 10-18% alcohol by volume, and alcohol is also a herbicide. So, no, don't put poison on your plants.


14

Provided that you are feeding the soil/plants the macro and micro nutrients they need there shouldn't be an issue. Epsom salt (1tbsp/gallon) every now and then helps with some of the micro nutrients. Minerals for your plants can be supplemented via plant food, rock dust, azomite or greensand if needed or through the soil/potting mix of the plants unless ...


13

As long as your tap can provide the required pressure to get a decent flow all the way to the end it should work in series, however you will find that running the hoses in series will lead to greater pressure nearer the tap, so I would recommend a splitter to make all 3 hoses have similar pressure and flow characteristics.


13

This is the jade plant or Crassula ovata. The one in the picture you have has been grown in low light and has stretched out and dropped the older leaves which is why it looks so thin. The leaves are plump and there are some yellow leaves so it does look to have been slightly over watered. The wikipedia entry noted above agrees with my experience with them ...


12

This plant is Zephyranthes carinata, a bulb with the common name Rain Lily. There are lots of hybrids these days, but the reason they're called rain lilies is because they flower after rain. Some only flower once a year, and that is later in the summer/autumn, when the autumn or summer rains arrive, but some of the newer hybrids flower more often and do ...


11

@winwaed's answer is definitely the right way to do it for conventionally grown seedlings. But you can sidestep this entire issue (how to best water tender seedlings) by using soil blocks. These are a compressed soil mixture that holds a surprising amount of water. I like to start small seeds in 3/4" blocks, larger seeds in 2" blocks. (When the seedlings in ...


10

When wine goes off, it literally "turns to vinegar". The ethanol becomes ethanoic acid (=acetic acid or vinegar). Ethanoic acid is relatively "weak" (acidity depends on the concentration, reactivity, and ease that it disassociates the H+ ion - my "weak" refers to the latter two properties). Although a glass of bad wine at a party might be okay with a ...


10

Given the previous answer, which covers hydroponic growing, I'll just add an explanation of how it's possible to over water a plant which is growing in potting compost, and thereby cause plant death or disease. The key is in the word 'clean' - hydroponics requires clean water, principally. When a plant has its roots in soil or compost, this isn't clean in ...


10

I believe I have gathered enough information that an answer is now available. Three main variables determine the direction roots grow: Gravity, light, and water. These are called gravitropism, phototropism, and hydrotropism. Phototropism is simply that the roots grow away from the light. I wouldn't think light extends much below the surface, so this ...


10

Rust is iron oxide, which does not harm plants in moderate amounts, because it is not water soluble unless the soil ph is very low. In fact, oxidized iron is what gives most red subsoils their color. Watering your plants with this water will not harm them at all. If you suppose there was nothing environmentally harmful in it before (which is NOT a good ...


10

If the greywater is from food preparation, it's fine to use if it doesn't contain salt, oil, or big pieces of food. I'd use a strainer, to get all the pieces. I think the water from the food dehydrator is fine, if it was used only for plant matter, not animal. So no animal, no salt, no oil, and I'd say if you were baking in the kitchen, don't use rinse ...


10

You should make sure, before you use the water, that no chemicals have been added for a week (some say half a week), and assuming you've only used chlorine, it should be down to 1 part per million after that time, or even lower, which means yes, you can use it for irrigation purposes. If you can, check the ph, which should be between 7 and 8 before ...


10

Judging by the new growth being red, I'd say these were Photinia fraserii 'Red Robin'. I can't tell if they're pleached or not, can't see any framework within the foliage, so its possible they're just trained by pruning to this shape. Unless you live somewhere that gets very hot and very dry in summer, they shouldn't need much watering because they have ...


10

It's not advisable to use this water on potted plants because of the risk of contaminants from detergent and fabric conditioners being present, but many people do spread it round the garden for plants in open soil. Its useful in a steam iron because it contains no lime - also useful for lime hating plants, again in the garden, not in pots. Regarding storing ...


10

Small fruiting tomatoes tend to be a lot juicier (that is ratio of meaty pulp to juice) than medium or large fruiting. Tomato produces a skin of a certain size for the number of fruits it has, then as b.nota points out extra water arrives. The fruit is already turgid, the extra water has nowhere to go but to burst the balloon. It is particularly a problem ...


10

There are two main causes of fruit split - the first is irregular watering. Once tomatoes have fruitlets, and especially as they start to get bigger and ripen, its critical to water sufficiently every day, without missing a day or two, or giving a bit less some days than others. If you don't, then the tomato, receiving a sudden influx of water, swells ...


9

The rule of thumb I've often heard is 1" per week, but I know that some vegetables like more water (e.g. celery) than others. (And yields decline in tomatoes with less water, but the flavor is supposed to be incredible in "dry farmed" tomatoes. YMMV.) Figure out how long it takes to deliver 1" of water (do the math using your square footage and 1 gal/hour), ...


9

These seem trendy. They are glass bulbs that you fill with water, then stick in the soil. They'll slowly drain over a few days:


9

I'd be more concerned about the trees dying from lack of water than the grass which surrounds them, frankly. Have you considered cutting away the grass at the base of the trees and replacing with a mulch instead? A humus rich mulch such as bark chips or good composted material applied in spring, when the ground is moist, would conserve moisture for the trees,...


9

If you want to write software probably you are looking for customized solutions, you have imagination and you don't mind to do it yourself. I suggest you try search with google: Arduino + Watering ( for example look at this document: THE GARDUINO GARDEN CONTROLLER It is a simple open-source platform with which many hobbyists have already ventured and you ...


9

The optimum time to water plants is in the morning, before any heat builds up - this gives time for the water to penetrate and be taken up so the plants are already well hydrated. Watering in noon day strong sun means you'll lose some to evaporation before it has much of a chance to help the plant. The next best time to water is the evening, after the heat ...


9

Contrary to what you often see, Wasabi can be grown in moist, but not submerged, soil. You'll do best starting with fresh, viable seeds. Here's a few points on preferred conditions in soil growing (this does not all apply to hydroponic growing): Soil should be free draining, highly organic soft soil at least 10 inches deep. The soil should not compact ...


8

I have some experience watering with grey-water collected directly from our household kitchen sink that I'd like to share. First, I'd like to comment that the bacteria from the grey-water should not be any more of an issue than worm, bird, insect or other feces that are a natural part of the soil content, so long at the fruits/veggies are adequately rinsed ...


8

I know a couple of people that have used AquaGlobes successfully. They are really just a commercial version of your soda bottle idea. If you have a lot of plants, they also make sophisticated systems for watering them for a longer period of time like this one.


8

Here's my experience with connecting soaker hoses. It pretty much supports @Rory Alsop's advice, but it was too long to fit in a comment: The soaker hoses I bought recommended a maximum of 150' in series using two 75' hoses. I tried connecting a 75' and a 50' hose for each row I had planted. My plan was to double back at the end of each bed. Each hose had a ...


8

I planted Palestine Strawberry clover in my yard (Phoenix, AZ) this past fall. My clover seems extraordinarily resilient so far (with the exception of falling prey to our local quail population). Considering clover is considered a difficult-to-remove lawn pest by many, I don't expect you'll have too much trouble getting them established. When I sowed mine, ...


8

The key thing with any plant in a pot of compost is that the roots must get air (oxygen, actually). Overwatering is the most common error. Stick your finger on the soil surface and drag it across the surface a short way. If it feels wet and soil sticks to your finger, you should not water. An alternative is to use a wooden skewer/stick/chop-stick. Shove it ...


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