5

This is known as 'brown center and hollow heart'. It is caused by abrupt changes in growing conditions (think of temperature or watering regime changes). You can still eat them, but you better remove the affected parts first. Unfortunately it makes it not suitable for sale anymore.


3

You are right, it would appear to be Acer campestre, the field maple. Given where you are, I suspect the explanation is not the very wet weather we had during May, but the very dry and warm 6 weeks or so that preceded it. It's a tree that's been planted less than a year, and for the first two years, it will need copious watering during dry spells,especially ...


2

The search topic you want is "propagating flamboyant tree from cuttings." According to Wikipedia, it can be done, and is a common way of propagating this plant. However, according to this article, you should wait until fall before taking a cutting from a Flamboyant Tree. Here is a summary of the steps you should follow: In the fall cut a 40-50 cm ...


2

The green parts of that plant are dead. Only time will tell if the roots have enough energy reserves to regrow, but it's not likely. A perennial that has its top killed by frost may regrow from the roots, but annuals usually don't have the stored reserves to allow regrowth. I would leave the top until it dries out, then remove it by breaking or trimming it ...


2

Look carefully at the join of the one leaf stalk and the stem. If there is a sign of growth in there then you may be in luck. With your rooted leaf in a moist planting compost, trim off what is clearly dead or dying and keep warm and minimally watered in filtered light and you might just get lucky. If not, at least an important lesson learned. You might want ...


1

Growing potatoes in pots can be a difficult business. They are frequently challenged for water, particularly if the sun can heat the side of the pot raising the temperature of the root ball. Once the roots have filled the pot they may be lucky and escape the pot through holes in the bottom and reach into the damp area under the pot, drawing moisture from a ...


1

If that plant was grown from a supermarket potato, it may be infected with a virus. Potatoes and tomatoes are susceptible to several virus diseases which reduce the yield of the crop. Some of these diseases have no visible symptoms until the crop is harvested and the yield is less than expected, but others cause leaf curl similar to your picture and other ...


1

Hydrangeas are deciduous, so the discoloration is likely down to natural processes that take place as the leaves are about to be discarded. Otherwise, Hydrangeas,depending on variety, are large plants - you don't say how long you've had the plant, but it won't do terribly well contained in a pot for very long,though they will do longer if you pot on into ...


1

A closeup picture of the underside of the leaf would help. However you can do my diagnosis: check a few leaves this way carefully turn a leaf over and look closely do you see small insects the size of an exclamation mark? or do you see small white larvae like a small exclamation mark? or do you see small white grains the size of salt? If you see the first ...


1

It appears to be in a plastic pot inside a cache pot. I recommend that you pull the inner pot out and dump out any water that might be sitting in it. After watering let the plant sit outside of the cache pot (setting it in the kitchen sink works well) for about an hour so the water can drain out and air can re-enter the soil. Before the next watering make ...


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