5

I don't think it is "a plant growing from the tree". I think it was actually the last ditch attempt of the tree itself to stay alive. When the white shoot had grown up through the soil it would have turned green in the light as it started to produce chlorophyll. Unfortunately, digging it up won't have increased its chances of survival, even if you replant ...


2

The problem is probably the amount of soil that the two plants have available for them to grow in. On the left side the roots can expand into what looks like a small flower bed and then even escape under the fence into what is on the other side. On the right side the plant is constrained by its brother on one side and paving stones on the other; it is true ...


2

Looks like a scale problem, so removing the plant outdoors while you try to deal with it was a good idea. You need to clean the leaves with a soapy (insecticidal soap) cloth to remove as many scales as possible - the brown hard lumps need to come off, along with any white fluffy bits (the crawlers). Then apply or spray an insecticidal soap solution, or use ...


2

No. Generally, when a seed germinates, it produces what will be its first root - often, a stem or shoot will start growing within a few days, even though there is not yet much root material. As the seedling produces more roots, the topgrowth increases too, and that will be the same in ether size of pod you're using, though the one in the smaller pod will ...


2

Well, your plants seems dandy fine to me. It looks like your plants are advancing and growing, naturally discarding of the oldest/lowest leaves. This does not look like any sort of tomato disease i'm aware of. It might be early stage root rot, which is unlikely, because it's a 1 month old plant in a new compost mix. It could also be nutrient deficiency, ...


2

This damage is what's known as 'skeletonized' - it's usually caused by insect larvae that eat between the veins of a leaf, leaving behind this typical 'lacework' look to the leaves. Later, once it becomes an adult, it usually disappears altogether. This is not the same thing as leaf miners - those leave what looks like a trail inside the leaf tissue, rarely ...


1

The photo doesn't magnify well so its not possible to see clearly, but the white 'spots' do appear to be mealybug. Mealybugs look white because they cover themselves in a white deposit, so the white 'spots' are likely actual bugs. Use a Q tip dipped in isopropyl alcohol and swab each white area with it. Further info here https://succulentplantcare.com/help-...


1

On the one hand your new plant may just be adjusting to different conditions of light. As we know pineapple requires a lot of light, as much as you can provide. On the other hand, I would be more concerned about the tips of the leaves turning brown and the way they are curled up, which indicates more of a water problem. Pineapple is a dry land bromeliad, ...


1

Normally the root (radicle) appears first, extends downwards and establishes a firm contact with the soil. Then the shoot appears with leaves. What can happen is the root begins growing but becomes tangled up in the shell and never finds a way out. This can be worse if the shell does not break open very much so there is little room for the radicle to emerge. ...


1

Mint usually does not mind a lot of sun provided there is water to go with it, otherwise it can dry out quite fast if it is not deeply rooting. As to your leaf issues, I think maybe there are two possibilities: some of the leaves are showing a kind of salt-shake spotting of the leaf, and one or two of the large leaves are possibly showing tunnels. The first ...


1

In short, no. It can't live with its stem submerged in water, it will die, and the one you show in the photograph is clearly very unwell and probably on its way out, showing some evidence of rot. It is possible to grow cacti hydroponically - this is said to be easier than growing in soil, though when you read the list of instructions, which include removing ...


1

It's a bad idea to add any salted shells of any nut to a compost bin as it's bad for plants. That may put salt in your compost which will then be put on your plants. Use unsalted shells only in your compost bin. Coffee grounds are good for composting but will turn your compost acidic but that depends on the ratio of coffee grounds to the rest of the compost....


1

I'm late to the discussion here but we have three of these shrubs that the deer ate uniformly on during the winter a few years ago. That next Spring the growth returned but the neighbors thought we'd pruned them into a "phallic" shape. No, the deer did that as we laughed hysterically. The neighborhood actually called them "the penis shrubs". Lol! They ...


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