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0

This is mechanical damage, so in other words something fell onto the plant or the plant fell itself on the floor. Maybe ask your partner or other people in your household what happend here.


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It looks like botritis (sp) fungus. Try not to get the flowers and leaves wet when watering.


3

First check if water is reaching the roots by poking a finger or a stick a few inches down into the pot- the soil should be moist all the way through, not just a thin layer at the top of the pot. If soil moisture looks good, it could be fusarium wilt or verticillium wilt, though your photos don't indicate the tell-tale leaf yellowing of those diseases. From ...


1

This is usually a sign that it needs more water. It can be that due to the weather the plants suddenly need more water than usual, or they want more water because the plants are bigger than before. The plants look further healthy! A lot of unripe tomatoes already, and new flowers. Good luck!


3

They may be too dry, and the soil may be too fluffy & dry. Maybe try misting them also. Ferns often do better with more moisture & humidity than these seem to show. Also, maybe try carefully remove expired material. They may need different soil. They may have been given too much nutrient before they were purchased; new soil might help alleviate that ...


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They are looking similar to my tomato plants and I had the same issue (Why are my tomato plant leaves curling). It has been suggested that they need more water so that could be your issue.


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Looks like a healthy cactus! perhaps mammilaria pilcayensis: that's something they may naturally do when getting around 22-30cm in height; in nature they may grow in clusters, and this helps them expand outward a little. The side its leaning toward likely has become a little weaker than the other side. As long as it looks ok it likely is: closeups might ...


2

I have something very similar on my tomato leaves. After looking at a lot of photos and reading about many possible issues, Septoria appears to be the most likely diagnosis - especially if like mine, your tomato fruit itself is unblemished as this probably rules out a bacterial spot. I'm not an expert, but I wonder if there is also some synergy among ...


2

I thnk the basic problem is that they are much too crowded together, so they are growing to try to get more light. Even small flowering plants need to be 8 or 12 inches apart to develop normally to their full size. If you sowed the seeds straight into the container, you need to sow more seeds than that since they won't all germinate, and then thin out the ...


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plant seems to be on a patio in a pot ? Clearly something biting through and eating the top layers of the leaf . I cannot identify the culprit from the picture. Are all the leaves similarly affected, or just the older outside ones ? Are the flowers affected ? Some pests may damage flowers but not foliage. Others may attack both. There do not appear to be any ...


1

If the outer pot has no drainage hole, and the inner pot does not reach the bottom, it's possible the outer pot has a lot of water in the bottom which may, or may not, be in contact with the plant. Sitting with its roots in water for a long period can kill a plant, but by the look of your plant, it looks more dessicated, that is, it's suffered significant ...


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I would suggest you get it in the ground as soon as you can; now is not an ideal time for planting, so you will need to water it in well and ensure you keep it well watered right up to autumn, particularly during warm, dry spells. The clematis you have can get up to 4 metres in height and is a vigorous plant, so it will do better in the ground than in a pot. ...


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Nursing a plant back to health takes time, so don't expect an over night change. It is very common for plants to experience stress from shipping, being in a container for 4 days means that your plant hasn't had a chance to photosynthesize and make food in 4 days so slowly get it closer to light. I wouldn't cut the damaged leaves, the plant can still ...


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It's probably phosphorus deficiency exacerbated by the cold. Just give it some monoammonium phosphate, or monopotassium phosphate; or else fertilize it generally (make sure your fertilizer has enough phosphorus) and warm up your plant, and the new growth should clear up. Cold weather can make plants require more phosphorus; it can make phosphorus less ...


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