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Never heard this called Ocean plant before, the usual common name is spider plant, though its botanical name is Chlorophytum comosum. The 'spider babies' are formed after flowering - yours just hasn't produced any yet, but may do so in the next few months as the plant matures a bit. They do best in bright daylight (not direct sun) so ensure your plant is ...


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Here it is usual to put a grease band around the trunk to prevent insects and larvae crawling up to the fruit buds. See this.


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Not sure what the brown spots are on the leaves. That isn't soil though - looks like coco coir. If the avocado seed is only in coco coir, then the roots are struggling to find nutrients, as coco coir isn't used for nutrients. If it were me, I'd replace it with some proper organic seed raising mix - get one that's soft and fluffy to the touch. If it's chunky ...


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It looks very unhappy and critically thirsty. If the plant has been "broken" from the roots then it will need to be treated differently. It should be put in cup of water so that it can grow new roots and only then should it be placed in a pot. Propagation methods Not easy for a beginner but very achievable when done correctly.


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The plant needs more light and clean water with no chlorine. (PH 6.2( is perfect but a little more or a little less is ok but not (PH 4 or PH 8) like tap water. Soil must be well draining so the water comes out from the pot quickly. Good luck


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"Cow dung cake" would be a "cow pattie" here in the northern US. :) I think that the dung might be the issue. Manure that is too fresh (even dried but not composted), can be too "hot" for the plant; that is, it provides way too much nitrogen and/or dehydrates the plant as it decomposes. You should only use composted manures for your plants. The other issue ...


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Pineapples die after fruiting, but usually produce suckers beforehand which replace the mother plant. I unfortunately don't see any suckers on your plant. There's more information about the three different types of suckers, and how best to propagate them, here. I would eat that lovely pineapple, if were you - the more golden the pineapple, the sweeter the ...


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Upon reading about sandalwood, I came across these facts: 1- it needs lots of sunlight 2- it is a hemi-parasite which means it can photosynthesize. However, it taps the roots of neighboring trees for added nutrients. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/santalum The latter may be the culprit of your failure (disclaimer: i never grew that tree. ...


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The spots are called cystoliths that won't harm the plant. It's a natural process along the cell wall of the leaves, in which almost all Rubber trees obtain. They're not pests or larvae, so there's no need to worry!!


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Naturally speaking, in most common cases plants receive their water from rain which is 6.2PH and should have very low PPM counts. Tap water that is high in impurities is referred to as hard water. I have hard water here in London at 300PPM and 8PH The water mainly contains lime, It also contains chlorine and chloramine After letting the chlorine ...


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Burning on grape wine is normal, you will find it also in more temperate regions, so in future the outer leaves could act as shading, in case of extreme weather. On small plants, burning is never a good thing, so I would add some shadows, also just some temporary screens. Forget about the "7 hour sun". I have seen many vineyards which cannot get so much ...


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Most plants in good healthy soil can handle hard water as the soil provides the nutrients and regulates PH naturally. But if you use industrial growing methods (e.g. hydroponics) and you need to add fertilizers to the water then it becomes important due to PPM Parts per million (PPM) is how much stuff other then water is in the water If you start with ...


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When it comes to watering plants it's all about the PH of the water or growing medium. If you have "hard water" it is likely that the PH would be A bit off but most good healthy living soils would "buffer" the PH and correct it. The biggest issue is if the water used contains chloramine and chlorine as disinfectants Hard water would contain minerals ...


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Looks like either scale or mealybug infestation - mealybugs are just a soft bodied type of scale. Check the undersides of the leaves to see if there's anything there that shouldn't be. You could probably wipe off the ones on the stems, and any on the woodier stems can be cleaned off using a cloth moistened with isopropyl alcohol or methylated spirits. ...


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Unless you're gardening in a production greenhouse or hydroponically, it's fine to use hard water/tap water. As noted in the Univ of Maryland article in GardenGems link, it's best to let municipal water sit overnight to ensure that the chlorine is cleared from it. Like @Bamboo, I've used hard water for decades with no issues (I don't have any ericaceous ...


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To some extent, it depends where you live in regard to using tapwater for your plants, because different countries may use different chemicals to ensure it is potable, though generally, tapwater isn't a problem for potted plants. Different areas or regions within a country may naturally have either soft or hard water though, and that can be important where ...


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If ever possible it is best to use distilled or RO water. This is not always possible. The risk is possible build up of the mineral salts in the soil in the pot. This and fertiliser gives that white crust around the top of the pot. What we all should do it flush out our plants every 4-6 months. This requires pouring the 4 times amount of water to ...


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Sorry for the late answer. I believe your plant has signs of Oedema. Often caused by over saturated soil during a cool period. It is believed the wall of the plant expands with some of this excess moisture leaving a pimple/blemish. As long as you stop watering so much during periods when the plant is at rest the problem should continue. The blemishes ...


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It's not dying, it's just some of the fronds have suffered a bit and they look bad, but there's obvious new growth in the centre of the plant, and that's what counts. Cut the badly damaged, discoloured fronds off as close to the point of origin as you can - unfortunately, it may be exposure to the constant AC that's causing the problem, but I had a palm like ...


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In an earlier question about this plant after it first arrived in the house it seemed to be in quite good condition with even foliage and quite nice shape. Clearly it has taken a turn for the worse. A reason for consideration is humidity in the air. From the design of the window in the room the area might call for some domestic heating, even though outside ...


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Sporadic watering is more likely the issue. Drying out a bonsai plant will lead to leaf drop. Plants do have a natural rhythm on when they need water, it slowly increases in spring and slows down slowly in late summer/fall. Once, you figure out the rhythm it becomes easier to predict when to check to see if they need water. Remember bonsai dry out much ...


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yes, Lilies do like full sun, 6-8 hours of light a day. This one does appear to be at the end of its blooming cycle. The flower petals will turn brown and fall off. You are then left with the plant and the flower stalk. You can cut off this flower stalk, unless you want it to make seeds, then leave the flower stalk. At the end of the growing season, ...


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it appears the Norfolk Island Pine has been over watered. This is easy to do when the room is too dark for the plant to grow. Plants will go dormant if they do not have the correct conditions to grow. The right amount of light, warmth and water. If a plant is in a dark room it will go dormant and stop growing or slow down growth. These means it is ...


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Despite the appearance, it looks like you have a viable plant here, it just needs a bit of tidying up. Probably at some time it was overwatered consistently, perhaps the root was buried too deep, and the top reacted negatively. One remediation would be to take the plant out of the pot and wash off all soil from the roots. With sharp secateurs or strong ...


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Yes, if left alone they will heal. You will always be able to see the scar, but they will heal. Just like a cut in a human it takes a little time, but not that long. Make sure you keep them clean and avoid getting any water near the damaged parts. Also like a human, a cut can later lead to a infection, but that is unlikely.


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If it is winter where you are you can expect a change in colour. This is due to the change in light levels. The other damage is probably frost damage. I believe this is Agave desmettiana, Smooth Agave, the only Agave I know that this smooth in texture with none to very small spines along the edges. This Agave is not frost tolerant. It come from a warm ...


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