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Okay, well let the soil dry out a bit more, but watering rules are these; water when the surface of the potting soil feels just about dry to the touch, but not so dry its shrunken from the sides of the pot; water well, and allow the excess to drain away freely from the base of the pot. Empty any outer pot or tray 30 minutes after watering, and again 30 ...


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Strawberries are often grown in containers - in some respects it's easier because the fruits dangle, and in a pot, that usually means over the edge rather than sitting on soil in the open ground. If you are growing indoors, you will probably need to pollinate the flowers yourself so you get fruit - outdoors they are pollinated by wind or insects. If you ...


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I think they will produce strawberries. Just keep them in shadow, and give them a lot of water. Your apartment will not be (hopefully) too hot. In any case the strawberries can survive on hot climate, just they tend to produce fruits on spring, just because they have some more light (they are a forest plant). My worry is about the lack of flowers. Usually ...


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Sansevieria can suffer from insects or fungi on the leaves but only rarely - this is mainly because the leaf surfaces are quite hard, shiny and smooth which makes it difficult for piercing or biting insects or spores to get started. If pests do attack it is most likely on roots or very young leaves, that is the soft tissues. This injury is most likely a ...


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That looks a bit like a scale infestation maybe? "Infected palms show tiny white spots on the undersides of the leaves. In time, the spots merge and the fronds look like they've been "whitewashed" or painted white. Some fronds may turn brown on top and still be white on the bottom, or they may turn brown entirely and curl up or even drop from the plant." ...


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Arecas grow fine in full sun in central and south Florida. Deeper green in the shade, more yellow in the sun. They will definitely outgrow those pots. Arecas planted in the ground will grow to 25 feet tall. They can easily have 10 to 50 trunks from the same plant. Each trunk can be 2 to 4 inches in diameter. At any given time the trunks will be of various ...


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The basic problem is that it doesn't have any active roots, just the remains of a root system. Earthworms don't eat plant roots, but if you have soil full of earthworms it may have other pests such as nematodes that do cause root damage. I would try repotting it in a new pot (not an old pot that you have sort-of cleaned somehow) and new sterile compost, ...


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It looks like Iresine herbstii, but it's got very leggy and badly needs cutting right back and maybe a slightly larger pot. These plants respond well to cutting back and it's usual to do this annually or biennially in spring; it should form a bushy plant with more than one main stem when it regrows. Turn it out of its current pot and check if its ...


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It looks like rust, which is a type of fungus. There are many species of rust but this could be common rust - Phragmidium spp. You should remove these leaves if you suspect it is rust to avoid further contamination. Tomato plants don't like their leaves to get wet so you should water the soil not the leaves. Looks like you are growing indoor under led ...


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Do you have palm weevils in your area? The tree is dead as said by GardenGems. Cut the trunk to pieces, and if you see holes, there might be some beetle larvae. In that case, a better solution is to burn the trunk, to avoid further dispersion of the pest.


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The information given in your question is not entirely clear, but hopefully I've interpreted it more or less correctly. Your plant appears to be Dracaena deremensis 'Warneckii'; it does not appreciate direct sunlight, but this particular variety likes to be in medium to bright indirect light, in temperatures of around 70 deg F, though they will just about ...


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Whilst I'm no expert, as far as I am concerned if your avocado's tap root is either wet or impeded you are susceptible to all sorts of problems. This is why people build large mounds above the ground and plant their avocado in it. Also young plants are susceptible to sunburn, if you are in tropical climates, sub tropical you are OK


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I would certainly leave them in the bags until the roots fill out the mix without becoming potbound. Keep an eye on the drainage holes for signs of roots as well as the sides of the bags. The leaves can stay on. They are stil photosynthesising to produce sugars and some of those sugars will be used in growing new roots. You should certainly water with ...


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Hello I have one of these and I had the same problem, It was the soil. My plant wasn’t getting enough water in a regular soil mix with perlite I was using . I replanted with coco coir worm castings and just some really chunky orchid bark for air flow . I stopped losing leaves , mine too , were all turning reddish and drying up . When it is well watered the ...


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Firstly, there is one important comment that is not meant to be glib nor to frustrate you but it’s a simple reality. Just like people and animals, plants are individuals. It doesn’t matter how scientific you are, that you provided the same conditions in the same way. This is more true for plants raised by seed than by cuttings but not always. Professional ...


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