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From my personal experience i will say this is due to sunlight, Location of this Aloe is not bright enough, these God's beautiful creation like to have a bright light. I have a full grown Aloe vera, When i changed my residence, I had to place my Aloe vera on stairs which was bright but not bright enough for Aloe. Now i moved them on the roof and now they are ...


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I'm not certain what the problem is - the puckering and wrinkling of the leaves might indicate a viral infection, but I'm not seeing any yellow bars or spots that often go along with a virus, though that particular symptom isn't always produced. If it is viral, it will get much, much worse. It's also possible that the new leaves were nibbled/damaged by ...


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Some people root prune their Acers every time they become root bound. It involves cutting off about 1/3 of the roots, then planting them back into the same pot. This means you have to be very good on watering, never letting them dry out the first year. Always keeping the soil nice and moist. Not wet. Winter is the best time to do root pruning. ...


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I'm sorry to say it looks like it might be bacterial leaf spot - there were signs of that on the plant when you asked your first ID question regarding it, so I imagine it was there when you bought it. The other thing I noticed was some leaves appeared eaten, so its worth inspecting the plant thoroughly, preferably with a magnifying glass, to see if you find ...


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As you've used the tag 'indoor' I'm assuming you're growing this as a houseplant? First, is there a drainage hole in that pot? Or is the plant in a pot with a drainage hole inside the outer pot? If it's in a container with no drainage hole, that needs to be corrected, so transfer to a different pot that has drainage. Watering and light requirements are ...


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Looks like tipburn from too much salt (fertilisers etc), or possibly dried out.


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You've washed it as much as you possibly can. If there are living insects, you should be able to see them. There is a small possibility that there are still eggs on the plant, but I wouldn't worry about it. You can spray the plant with an systemic insecticide, which will treat the roots. Spray the plant not the roots. The best thing you can do at this ...


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It's a Dracena. Get it in some nice potting mix with lots of drainage. The roots will take off with time. For the time being, don't fertilise. Also when you water it remember the size of the roots. Little roots can't take up a huge pots worth of water. You want the soil to have plenty of air for the roots to breath. If you water log them with too ...


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It certainly isn't "natural" for a desert cactus to have a continuous supply of water, but they seem to be healthy enough growing continuously for half the year if they do have sufficient light, heat, and water. But in the UK I have no experience of trying to keep them growing continuously all year round with artificial light in winter, and for my ...


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It would seem not,though there is little research in regard to the health of any succulent plant should it not experience dormancy. There isn't much difference in the dormancy story between desert or any other type of cacti or succulent either; dormancy or partial dormancy can be triggered by periods of stress or drought, as well as the more usual cooler ...


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As per the second question you linked to, the issue is likely the size of the container it's growing in - Jasminum sambac is a large, evergreen, scrambling plant, with a height and spread of 2.5-4 metres, with a spread up to 1.5 metres in the ground. In order to grow properly, the plant needs to form quite a widespread and deep root system as it matures, ...


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Butternut squash is able to produce fruit reliably if the nights and days are warm, there is moisture available and the vine is growing vigorously. In my area the nights in July and August are warm and if the soil is fertile and there is occasional rain the fruit will be rewarding. However in September cooler nights come, and the bright green leaves start to ...


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Fittonia likes humidity, heat and indirect light. The first two are essential, and there is some movement on the third as least important. Its natural environment is in a steamy tropical forest. A close substitute in a temperate environment is under the benches of a steam heated greenhouse, where it can grow in poor soil but constantly dripped on from ...


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