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16

Green peppers are not ripe. Even if the seeds are viable (immature pepper seeds can be grown if planted soon after harvesting, but don't have the food storage for long storage), if the pepper is green, it's not ripe. They can ripen to a lot of colors, but the most common is red (for varieties sold for green use). Some varieties were bred to remain green for ...


13

It's an internal proliferation known as a form of parthenocarpy - formation of fruit without fertilization. So it's just a sort of clone or internal baby pepper, sometimes looking much more like a pepper than the pic you've shown. Common in sweet peppers and yes, edible.


11

I'm revising my answer again, but this time with an opinion based on my observations of peppers (not bell types specifically): My opinion is that they'll continue to live as long as they're healthy and pruned. If they're in a small container and not pruned, they might die after they produce ripe fruit the first or second time, but if you prune them ...


9

Usually bell peppers ripen red, orange, yellow or less commonly, brown. Most green peppers that you eat are actually unripe ones that ripen to other colors. Some peppers ripen green, but that is rare. To quote farmerdill on gardenweb, "Just after WW II several green when ripe varieties were introduced to extend the market window." The two green-when-ripe ...


9

Unless harmful elements fell into your manure during those 20 years without your knowledge, it certainly shouldn't hurt anything. It might not be as potent as properly matured and composted manure, that's all. Concerning your clay soil : don't work in your garden if it rained in the last 2 days to avoid compacting the soil.


8

For what it's worth we have a local greenhouse that grows bell peppers and tomatoes year round. They use plants for 2 years. I think they trash them after that because the amount of woody stems starts to get out of hand. Since an individual grower isn't as concerned about production per square foot, you can probably extend this by at least another year. ...


8

What I have done is open up the peppers and then clean and dry the seeds out. I subsequently store the seeds and plant them at the appropriate time in the season. In my case I plant them indoors in early January on a heat mat and subsequently transfer them outside. This will give you a head start to the season. I plant them in a seeding mix. Generally, ...


7

Some say vitamin B1 (thiamin) is supposed to help for transplant shock. Thiamin contains sulfur; so, maybe that has something to do with it. If sulfur has anything to do with it, Epsom salt (magnesium sulfate) may help. Peppers are supposed to appreciate a certain amount of Epsom salt (diluted a lot, of course). After googling it, I see a recommendation for ...


7

Sounds like perfect stuff. You are going into winter, yes? If you are, just put it on top of the beds thickly. This will help keep the weed seeds already in the soil from germinating as well. In the spring, when your soil has dried, double dig your vegetable beds 3' in width throwing the clay soil on top of the manure. Micro and macro organisms have ...


7

There appears to be a long standing insect infestation, possiby whitefly (does anything rise up and fly about when you go near or disturb the plant?) or scale infestation of some sort. The leaves look somewhat sticky, they're unhealthy with evidence of damage on the stems as well - there are white dots on the upper surface of the leaves and I think there ...


7

I checked both options provided by cr0 and Alina (Thank you both very very much). During the process of comparing the symptoms of glasshouse whitefly and spider mites to my plant's situation i stumbled upon something that i belive matches the damage done to the pepper more than both of the previously mentioned insects - thrips. Here are the reasons why i ...


6

Those white hairs (marked in green) are trichomes, which are a perfectly normal part of the plant. The little spots (marked in red) however look like edema, which indicate too much moisture or over-watering. Try watering them less, or less often (mine do well with being watered only every other day) and since you're growing indoors, air the room regularly (...


6

Red is generally a final ripening stage for most peppers, indicating they are fully mature. There are many different kinds of mild chilis, however, referred to as "banana peppers" and some of them eventually become red instead of golden yellow. It is also definitely possible you have something other than a true banana pepper growing - through mislabeling or ...


6

I am trying this right now. I have some transplanted into cold frames with an additional cone of opaque greenhouse film over them and christmas lights available for the coldest nights. It's been about 40-55 degree in the cold frame pretty steadily so far in this warm Dec of 2015. I left the leaves on some and denuded others that had partial frost damage. ...


6

Your close up leaf images show an aphid infestation. In my experience, this is a highly persistent insect that infests chili plants amongst others with over 500 different types of Aphids specific to particular plants. My own chilli plant is over one year old and got infested while outside, and again when wintered inside. I've been spraying regularly with ...


6

Yes, your peppers will be safe to eat. the only chance of contamination is if soil from your planter splashes onto the fruit, but they can be washed, and soured soil isn't much higher in human pathogens than healthy soil is. Checking for good drainage is always a key component to container gardening, (any gardening, actually, but most problems cropping up ...


6

I'll help with a few suggestions on pruning. First however, you need to know that those leaves FEED your plant. Topping to make a plant thicker is fine but this usually works best with lots of sun. Your plant is struggling to make enough food for itself. It is long and lanky because it is not getting enough light. The leaves get thin and larger to be ...


5

What I do to avoid transplant shock, is to plant my seeds into toilet roll inners filled with potting mix and raise them in a protected environment away from birds, slugs, etc. When it's time for transplanting, the entire tube gets planted into the soil and there is no transplant shock whatsoever. The cardboard tube rots very quickly and the plant happily ...


5

To be frank, I'd bin them without a second's hesitation, and would have done so a while back, and that's what I recommend to you. They're serving no useful purpose other than as a source of infection to your other plants, but it may be too late, the aphid infestation may already have spread to those too - use neem spray to treat them with. Curled leaves on ...


5

In the case of the Basil, it shouldn't be too difficult to keep it on a small scale by pruning off the tallest stem tips every few weeks. If you see any flowers begin to develop cut those off as well. When Basil flowers are allowed to develop very much their flavor begins to go off. Of course, if you're using the Basil fast enough you can keep the growth ...


5

Cut them open and plant the seeds. The peppers appear dry to me, in which case you just need to break them open and the seeds will simply fall out. If the peppers are not dry, clean them of any pepper flesh and plant them should be all that you need to do. It should not be necessary to stratify them first since they are not a temperate species, per se. ...


5

No, they're not the same problem by the sound of it, though it could be. What you seem to be describing on your beans are leafminers, which are the larvae from eggs laid inside the leaf by a female fly that looks greyish in appearance. As the eggs hatch, the larvae then tunnel their way through the leaf, eating as they go. As this is is an edible crop, you ...


5

If you bought these plants this year, even though they're growing in close proximity, and even if the Reaper pollinates a bell pepper, it won't affect the plants or fruits - it only affects the seeds within, which will now be some sort of cross between the peppers if you grow from them next year. If, though, you grew these yourself from seeds you saved, and ...


5

The biggest cause of blossom end rot is not, in fact, calcium shortage in the soil - it's erratic watering. If the plant can't take up enough water for its needs regularly, it also cannot take up the calcium it needs. The weather cycle you describe is perfect for blossom end rot, if you didn't supplement sufficiently well with water when it was very hot and ...


5

As is often pointed out in books on small-space gardening, spacing recommendations aren't set to maximise yield per unit area, but yield per plant. If 3 plants per pot works, carry on. You'll get more chillies this way than growing only 1/3 of the plants. You may be able to get bigger fruit by thinning them. You may need to water and fertilise more often ...


4

Yes, just like tomatoes, it should help redirect the plant's energy into ripening what's there rather than growing on burgeoning fruits from flowers. You can remove the leaves and stems above the existing fruits you want to keep as well, which also helps.


4

Mine has produced for 2 years and I'm questioning if it's going to make it for 3, carrying it through the winter in a homemade growth chamber where it loses most of its leaves. The 2nd year was more productive than the first, and now the lower portion of the stalk looks more like a tree with arthritis than a pepper.


4

It will depend on climate - more than the variety imho. Here in North Texas I have no problem with two weeks, assuming the peppers weren't picked when very ripe. However in somewhere like New Mexico where it is much drier, you can just leave them out to dry naturally. They hang them up on strings, etc to dry.


4

If those bubble things are hard, they're probably just root nodules, which often develop when there's enough humidity. If true, they're not dangerous at all and actually make rooting cuttings and transplanting more readily successful. However, in the picture there where they're all grouped together on what appears to be a healed wound of your plant, it does ...


4

This is my favorite pepper for a number of reasons, and I have grown it for years. I've had decent germination rates using potting soil on a heating pad. They don't germinate well in the peat pots. I've never heard of using saltpeter. In my experience over the past 10 years or so, it is important to hand pollinate rocoto (aka locoto in Bolivia) - ...


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