3

The bulb should measure at least 5 cm (1.96 inch), but not more than 7 cm (2.75 inch). When it becomes too big you'll risk it to become stringy and tough. Information taken from here.


2

It might be Solanum nigrum, common name black nightshade, though the single leaf you show looks a little narrow. Anecdotally, it is thought to be highly toxic, but how poisonous it actually is is not entirely clear, see here https://pfaf.org/user/plant.aspx?LatinName=Solanum+nigrum. It is neither woody nightshade (Solanum dulcamara) nor deadly nightshade (...


2

There's no reason why your tomato plant would not give you much pleasure for a while. Assuming the grower chose a variety suitable for elevated temperature the existing trusses will likely go on to produce good fruit. However, there will be problems or the threat of problems. Many gardeners stop trying to grow tomatoes in the hot summers of the island ...


1

By cooking pot, do you mean something used to cook with? If you use it to grow plants, the number one issue will be drainage. Ideally containers need to have drainage from which water can flow out of the container. Otherwise excess water may sit at the bottom of the container and cause the roots to rot. Another thing is with such container, depth is often ...


1

You need to increase the amount of water you're giving, so try watering them every day with the amount you describe rather than every other day. Once they set fruit, they require regular and sufficient water so the fruits can develop and to try to prevent fruit split and blossom end rot; if your tomato plant leaves are wilting by the second day, they're not ...


1

It's quite normal behaviour for a warm location. In my location in Ontario I plant out at the beginning of June and for a while the tomatoes do well with lots of vegetative growth and set about 3 trusses most of which go on to produce normal fruit. Then the heat sets in and weird things start happening. The vegetative growth slows, multiple flower trusses ...


1

Unless you can find some advice tailored to your particular situation, go back to first principles. Perennial crops (rhubarb, soft fruits, etc) are excluded from the rotation for the obvious reason, though if you replace old perennials with new plants, consider putting them in a different location. There are five main vegetable groups in the rotation ...


1

Sometimes, yes, it works, so if yours has bolted, it's worth a try, you've nothing to lose, its either cut back or rip the plant out. Depending where you live though, you may have to wait for cooler weather conditions to see any useful growth.


1

I have never grown Florence fennel (the bulbing type) or eaten it as far as I can recall, but there are some general horticultural principles we can apply depending on the final use of the plant. We as gardeners know that annuals/biennials tend to follow a pattern of vegetative growth followed by reproductive behaviour or going to seed. Also that the seed ...


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