12

I haven't seen any single book that provides all of the information you're looking for, but you can get most of what you want with a small collection of reference guides. The Garden Primer by Barbara Damrosch has broad coverage of plants commonly found in North American yards: from vegetables and small fruit to bulbs, shrubs, and trees (both shade and ...


12

It won't digest live plant matter. Venus flytraps secrete the enzymes phosphatase, proteinase, nuclease and amylase. These enzymes target insect prey, which have high levels of protein. They do not digest plant matter. When a leaf closes on a bug, it (the bug) will often secrete chemicals such as uric acid, which keep the leaf closed. Otherwise (such as if ...


12

This is the Prayer plant (Maranta leuconeura), named because the way the leaves fold up at night is reminiscent of hands held together in prayer. This particular plant is M. leuconeura var. erythroneura, which has the prominent red veins and white spine on the leaves shown in your photographs. Care tips: They're native to the tropics so they don't like ...


11

Looks like natural variegation to me...looks like a typical golden pothos (Epipremnum aureum). It's supposed to have these marks. They show up and contrast best with good lighting. Don't worry about this - it's natural, and healthy.


10

Judging by the new growth being red, I'd say these were Photinia fraserii 'Red Robin'. I can't tell if they're pleached or not, can't see any framework within the foliage, so its possible they're just trained by pruning to this shape. Unless you live somewhere that gets very hot and very dry in summer, they shouldn't need much watering because they have ...


10

First, let me assure you there is no need to apologise for 'your ignorance'; you're not the first to not know a plant name and you certainly won't be the last! That said, this is Schlumbergera truncata, a forest type cactus plant,commonly known as Christmas cactus. It's relatively easy care; this answer here, whilst it does contain some slightly irrelevant ...


9

It really comes down to the type of tree eg Fruit, Deciduous, Evergreen, etc then the specific species as to when is (considered) the best time of year to prune... The same is true for plants. As a very general rule of thumb, prune in: Dead of Winter. Or Spring (exact time during Spring will depend on what it is you're pruning) through to early Summer. ...


9

Based on the plump, browning tips on the leaves, this initially appears to be classic aloe over-watering response. BUT, once every three weeks isn't necessarily an unreasonable watering schedule for an aloe, if the soil is appropriate. As you have correctly observed, the soil is a very dark peat-based soil. It holds water very well and drains out slowly, ...


8

It's a rhododendron, probably a cultivar like PJM partial shade to full sun prefers moist, cool, acidic, well-drained, organic soil. Lots of peat moss helps much more soil adaptable than most rhododendrons avoid harsh, dry, windswept sites you can wrap it in burlap or other windproofing material to protect from leaf burn in the winter


8

That seems a good idea, since the plants useful for your dragon surely are used to the same climate of it. You could plante it if the soil is the same that you use for your animal the manure is not dangerous for your animal there is space enough for animal and plants I can start with saying that spinach, broccoli and Kale (Brassica oleracea Acephala Group,...


8

This is Equisetum arvense, the field horsetail or common horsetail. It is a herbaceous perennial plant, native throughout the arctic and temperate regions of the northern hemisphere. ~Wikipedia Benefits: http://www.herbwisdom.com/herb-horsetail.html Eradication: http://extension.psu.edu/plants/green-industry/news/2012/weed-of-the-month-field-horsetail-...


8

Looks like a heavy whitefly aphid infestation - they're usually underneath the leaves and suck the sap within, causing the leaf to shrivel and die. You can't treat with pesticide because it's an edible plant, so your only recourse is something like neem or insecticidal soap spray, I'm afraid. Further information on how to deal with whitefly on edible plants ...


7

Monarda (bee balm) likes damp, enriched soil, but also likes a lot of sun. They often don't flower in their first year, but I'd have expected flowers in its second year, certainly. If it dries out frequently, you may not get flowers, and depending on which variety you're growing, it might not be getting enough sun. If the soil it's growing in is poor and ...


7

Does the basil on the left side have any chances of survival? It doesn't seem likely, but there is still some green on the leaves. The plant on the left side is too far gone. It will never fully recover, and should be disposed of. The plant looks like it either took some cold, or got basil fusarium wilt. I think the latter is unlikely, but I'd keep that ...


7

It looks like Dracaena fragrans 'Massangeana' - one that hasn't formed a woody trunk yet. The reason it's wilting during the day is the sunlight - these plants do not appreciate direct sun. Dappled sunlight (like that beneath a tree canopy) is okay, but not full on sunlight. If you can, move it somewhere it gets bright daylight, but no direct sun, or very ...


7

It's a Fiddle-leaf Fig (Ficus lyrata). Here are some conditions to provide: Pot/mix: These have large, invasive root systems and need large pots. They like a well drained, peaty mix with some mineral content (like grit). To keep them from growing too big (6' isn't uncommon), yearly root pruning and repotting can be necessary. Simply lift the plant from the ...


7

Actually, I was in a similar situation a few weeks ago: A friend gave me an aloe crown that looked exactly like yours (i.e. slightly dry stem, no roots). What worked for me was to simply plant it into a pot with a mix of normal potting soil and some sand, water it and wait. It seems to have rooted quickly, at least it already started growing one or two new ...


7

How much to water is a complex question where you have to evaluate how much light is present, the relative humidity and the water needs of the plant. Bulbs do not normally like wet feet. The amaryllis is now in a period of fast growth using up the energy stored in the fall. If the pot has drainage at the bottom and it is in high light then water ...


7

Couple of things - when you bought your hyacinth bulb, was it a prepared, pre treated one, sold specially for growing indoors? Or was it just an ordinary outdoor one? It's usual to buy a prepared one for indoor growing, to ensure they flower in late winter rather than waiting for late spring, as they naturally do, so the fact yours has already finished ...


7

Read all you can about indoor growing & seek out varieties that are know to do well in containers. (Example 1: Datil Pepper) (Example 2: Pineapple Rocoto) (Example 3: Bhut Jolokia / Ghost) The most important things for you will be light & nutrients (a good fertilizer applied properly & at the correct intervals). Get a grow light (Example 1) (...


7

I can't get a close enough image to examine the spots thoroughly, but because they're evenly spaced, its most likely these are sporangia, or spore cases. It's a sign of a healthy plant and the spores are produced as part of the reproductive process. Rust infection can be a problem on these plants in some areas, but the orange spots are randomly spaced, so ...


7

Cleaning of plant leaves is usually only done on houseplants, because they're inclined to accumulate a lot of dust over time. Outdoors, exposed to the elements, plants get 'cleaned' by moving air (wind, or a breeze) and rain, so its not usually necessary, unless something has been spilled over them, like maybe dust and dirt from nearby construction/building ...


7

It's a Fittonia, common name Nerve plant. These can be difficult to keep healthy because they require high humidity, draught free conditions and steady, warm temperatures. They do not appreciate sunlight either, preferring bright daylight instead - think rain forest conditions. They're good in terrariums, but keeping the humidity up in an ordinary room can ...


6

It sounds like humidity is the problem. If I understand correctly, you are growing it in a pot in a window sill? In non-tropical climates, I have only ever seen Nepenthes growing in tropical greenhouses (I find they are common plants in public tropical greenhouses in both the US and UK). In the days when I grew CPs (Carnivorous Plants) myself, I never ...


6

The white spots are not powdery mildew. They are a mixture of pesticide residue and hard water stains from overhead watering in the grower's greenhouse. Powdery mildew is usually "fuzzy" and residue is flat on the leaf. Either way wiping the leaves with a cloth is sufficient as a first stage. If it is powdery mildew it will return, residue will not. ...


6

Coffee is considered a tropical plant and is not going to overwinter in the Netherlands. It makes a good house plant but there are some obstacles between you and a cup of coffee you grew and processed yourself. a plant capable of fruiting is two to three meters tall it is usually three to five years old before flowering and producing beans the beans can ...


6

There are plants that improve air quality - some remove chemicals from the air, formaldehyde for example, but as for removing smells, I can't say I've noticed they're too good at that, though claims are made that some do. There is a list of 19 plants I know about from research done by NASA, but some of those have barbs or thorns, or are very fussy about ...


6

I assume that you yourself will be the only one watering the plant. Most people use a saucer under the pot (without gravel) and avoid too much water build up by watering the plant only as needed. If you do over water the plant you can carefully empty the saucer or leave it until the excess has soaked into the soil (it's very unlikely that you will get ...


6

Firstly, the 50/50 peat moss perlite mix contains absolutely zero nutrients. That means the plant isn't getting the building blocks necessary to grow. Start fertilizing with your watering every other week, with a balanced fertilizer. Miracle-Gro is fine. That may not be the best mix for a fern (it isn't, actually), and I'd repot it into something more ...


6

I wonder whether turtles mind bitter greens? What we find unpalatable might be just fine with them. And some of the most nutritious greens out there aren't the ones we tend to prefer the taste of. Also, from what little I understand of tortoise diets, getting the proper balance of nutrients through appropriate foods for your particular type of tortoise is ...


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