12

Time of year: Any time of year works, as long as the ground is not frozen, or the air very hot and dry. Obviously frozen ground will be 'hard to work with', and you will not be able to plant the tree properly. If the air is hot and dry, then sometimes even when the soil has sufficient moisture, the tree with it's compromised root system could dry out and ...


11

I've never heard of the need. The issue with hardening is that you're taking a plant in a largely controlled environment with low light levels, and a steady temperature, no wind, to a highly varied environment with strong sunlight, a wider range of temperatures and wind. The stems have to harden, the leaf wax increases, and probably lots of other ...


8

Don't overthink it. They transplant reasonably well, as in, take a shovel, dig em up, replant quickly without giving the roots time to dry out (or dig up, heel in to keep the roots moist, then plant - but if you can do it in one step it's less work for you, less shock for them.) I would question why that row is fading - if it just needed severely pruned, ...


8

In many cases, it is simply for convenience. However; there are some plants which do not tolerate transplanting. Therefore, to start seeds indoors to get a head start and/ or maximize their strong stocks, people use peat pots so they can transfer them outdoors without transplantation. One noted example of an intolerant plant is corn.


7

Some say vitamin B1 (thiamin) is supposed to help for transplant shock. Thiamin contains sulfur; so, maybe that has something to do with it. If sulfur has anything to do with it, Epsom salt (magnesium sulfate) may help. Peppers are supposed to appreciate a certain amount of Epsom salt (diluted a lot, of course). After googling it, I see a recommendation for ...


7

The spinach seedlings are far more fragile; I'd recommend moving the mint. You can do it anytime, but the sooner the better. As you have just planted the mint, it should come out fairly easily. Be as careful as possible, and don't disturb the spinach seedlings. Repot the mint normally in a new container, and refill the hole in the mix for the spinach. I'd ...


7

I gardened for many years in Zone 4b/5a at 9/10ths of a mile elevation before moving to Zone 8a last summer. For many of the plants you mentioned, age of the transplant is not a huge issue, as long as while you are growing them out inside you move them to larger pots as their root balls fill the old ones, plus you are careful with the roots and make sure to ...


7

You can actually do whichever you want. I've done both. If the plants are healthy, feel free to take the plastic hanger supports off and set it on top of the other pot or somewhere else in the yard. Make sure there's enough drainage from that bigger pot so that when you water it, it's not sitting in stagnant water. However, any time you have a bigger pot, ...


7

Some plants are sensitive to light changes (such as Shark Fin Melon). I think this is partially because Shark Fin Melon is supposed to rely on light changes to know when to set fruit, but even though it may wilt for a while, it recovers. I don't know of any issues with basil. However, if there are issues, I recommend just keeping the plant as strong and ...


7

Patience. One of the hardest parts of being a gardener. Strawberry plants rarely produce berries the first year they are transplanted. Instead they spend most of their resources and nutrients establishing a strong root system so they are ready to fruit next year. By that time most of the Nitrogen content of the manure will have either been A) taken up by ...


7

In my 25 years as a landscaper in the Pacific Northwest, I have never heard of such a treatment. With that said, the only thinking I can come up with is that the arborist feels that by watering in the tree, you will be overly compacting the soil, destroying the larger air pockets, and trapping excess water around the rootball which might cause rot. I would ...


6

As a plant gets bigger it gets more roots - when you move a plant, especially when you remove it from a pot, even very carefully, you destroy many of the roots. This shocks the plant and can put it back / /kill it. Also some plants develop a tap root and obviously they can't do this in a pot. In this situation I would use a larger peat / paper pot and move ...


6

You can do that, but not for more than a couple days, before giving them light again. You don't want to see any signs of etiolation, or you will have to 'harden off' the plants back into light. If you have to hold them longer than that, try to find some better lighting, indirect sunlight or a bright fluorescent or LED bulb. Even if it's cold, the darkness ...


6

This looks a lot like a tiny maple seedling in it's first year, note the cotyledons - the seed leaves, the (in this case long & tongue-shaped) leaves that appear before the true leaves - which are still present. The pictures are a bit blurry, so I can't be absolutely sure but I've seen dozens of these under my Granny's Japanese Maple. Potting up ...


6

I have no idea how you've managed to find only references that suggest this "scorched earth" approach to repotting - which is only appropriate (IMHO) when you are trying to salvage plants with soil disease issues (and not that great then - vegetative propagation from above the soil line is a path with greater chance of success in that case.) "Cleaning the ...


6

Roots head for moisture not walls. If you want a plant with deep roots, you water deeply and allow to dry before watering again. This trains the roots to grow towards the water so it will have the ability to access water way below the surface, thus drought tolerant/resistant. The most important reason to maintain pot size to the plant size is water/...


6

It's true that cucumbers are best planted as seed in the location in which they will grow. There are however many considerations to work through when contemplating a relocation. What I'm thinking in this situation... Leave in small pots: no risk of transplant shock; water daily; apply tonic (such as seaweed emulsion) weekly; apply fertiliser ...


6

This is another one that I've done. For reference I'm in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USDA zone 6b, last frost in April, First frost in September. We get 40-60" of precipitation per year, and the soil is mostly decent clay based soil, sometimes rocky. There were 3 of the trees and they were at about 12', so yours might be bigger. Because they dry and burn easily ...


5

What I do to avoid transplant shock, is to plant my seeds into toilet roll inners filled with potting mix and raise them in a protected environment away from birds, slugs, etc. When it's time for transplanting, the entire tube gets planted into the soil and there is no transplant shock whatsoever. The cardboard tube rots very quickly and the plant happily ...


5

If you only have two leaves, those will be the cotyledons, and aren't true leaves. The second pair of leaves will be though, but you need to wait to pot it on until a good root system has been formed. You then move it to a pot that's a bit bigger, then later a bigger one again, till after a few years, it ends up in a 15 gallon pot. While its in the pot it's ...


5

This has worked for me for 20+ years, just like tomatoes. And of course, don't over water to avoid root rot.


5

Yes, the timing is bad - but short of a time machine to travel back to the fall, just dig them up and pot them - they won't be happy, but they will probably mostly survive the experience if they are not already marginal. If they die, buy new ones. Digging in late evening might be best, so they can settle into the pots before the sun comes out.


5

Bamboo is right that generally you do need roots to replant an aloe vera pup, but anecdotally I know people who say they've been successful replanting a rootless pup. You've already got the pup and the soil, so I'd keep going with it. The coir is fine as a planting medium, but I disagree with the advice to dry it out. For the plant to root, it will need to ...


5

Timing is, IME, important. I got 3 bamboo (A Phyllostachys that I vary between thinking is one of 3 or 4 specific cultivars) that were rudely chopped off and dug up in the middle of the summer (the house it came from was being sold...) One survived, barely, and has since gone on to be a moderately decent stand given that it's not fully hardy here and all top ...


5

It's recommended that you wait until after the first true leaves appear before transplanting seedlings. I plant my seeds into small grow-bags made of plant-fiber. The roots can then grow right through the bottom and when this happens i know it's time to transplant. I also seed mine outside so I don't need to harden off. And I can then plant without ...


5

No, doesn't need to be in shade - lilac does prefer full sun, but that doesn't mean it won't cope with any shade. It may be getting more sun than you're aware of, but whether you can move it successfully or not is dependent on how long its been there - if you don't know that, then it depends how big it is, and whether its a dwarf variety. If it's been in ...


5

From the daylilies faq When is the right time to plant daylilies? North In the North, spring planting is normally preferred. Fall planting in colder climates can prove fatal for daylilies because they often do not have adequate time to form new roots and to begin to anchor themselves before winter comes. Experienced gardeners, however, can plant ...


5

Certainly possible, some investigation is in order first: the more the soil drains quickly the farther out the root system will spread. Take a space and trench around the perimeter of the plant. What kind of soil and how many roots do you find? the older the plant the more established the root system. Five year old seedlings pop out like Lego. Twenty ...


5

The reasoning behind this advice to only use the right sized pot is that if you put a very small plant into a large pot filled with potting medium, most of the medium (potting compost) will not be occupied by anything except bacteria and other life forms, some of which may not be desirable. The potting medium also may become 'sour' because, if the rootball ...


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