21

Some trees have a single "gender" but many do not. The way to tell is to see if the male (pollen) parts are present on separate flowers on different trees from the "female" (ovary - ie, infant fruit) parts. Also, you should be aware that issues with pollination may not always be related to needing both "male" and "female" trees around - sometimes a tree ...


18

The type of pruning you're looking for is called crown reduction. The main purpose of this is to reduce the height of the tree by cutting down its crown, as explained here. Since you say your tree is 30+ feet high, it is advisable to get professional help instead of venturing out to do this on your own. Note that the pruning cuts that will be made are ...


15

Most citrus trees are grafted onto a different rootstock, usually sweet orange these days, even if the fruit from the top graft is going to be lemon or lime. The only way a lemon tree can completely turn into an orange tree is if the grafted part has died and the rootstock then grows on its own, producing the fruit its programmed to produce, depending on the ...


14

The sooner you get it in the ground the better (unless your ground is currently frozen or soon will be). The more sun it gets the better (IMHO). At the moment you have a small tree, but when selecting an appropriate place to plant the tree take into account its final full grown size. Measure from the bottom of the plastic wrap to the top of the soil. That is ...


14

Don't bother; really. You likely have a bigger problem. Persian limes are are sterile triploids, hence no seeds. What that means is the tree itself is a hybrid which was grafted onto the rootstock of a completely different citrus variety. What that means to you is that there is a very strong chance the shoots are coming from original tree stock and you ...


14

It is extremely hard to control the rate of fruit production precisely in a healthy manner. Pruning (good pruning cuts) in general encourage fruiting and over-pruning the tree or bad cuts can cause the tree to go into shock and not produce any fruit. I would suggest thinning as an alternative. Thinning is when you selectively remove a few fruits to ...


14

That is lichen, which is not detrimental to your tree's health (it's not a parasite, it lives off of photosynthesis). This is normal, no need to worry.


13

Some wisdom from the Lion King: Mufasa: Everything you see exists together, in a delicate balance. As king, you need to understand that balance, and respect all the creatures-- from the crawling ant to the leaping antelope. Simba: But, Dad, don't we eat the antelope? Mufasa: Yes, Simba, but let me explain. When we die, our bodies become ...


13

I am currently harvesting some of mine. I support the apple in the palm of my hand and give it a slight twist; if the apple is ready to harvest, it will separate easily from the spur. Those that are not quite ready for harvesting often ripen very quickly, so it is a good idea to check the ground below the tree every couple of days, to collect up any ...


12

This is not a disease, but a disorder called Bitter Pit (see photo here) which, like blossom end rot in cucurbits (pumpkins, zucchini etc), is caused by a calcium deficiency: Bitter pit is caused by low levels of calcium in the fruit and poor distribution of calcium within the tree during fruit development. However, it is rarely due to a deficiency of ...


12

This is not really an answer to your question, but may be a step towards an answer. If you want a plant guild adapted to your area that contains Prunus species, you may want to look at your local forest to understand how it is put together and where Prunus species fit into it. In Vegetation of Wisconsin, John T. Curtis measured the prevailance of plant ...


12

This is Fire Blight, a bacterial infection commonly spread by bees and other pollinators. Hence the infection usually starts at the blossoms. It typically extends into the branches and twigs, but is often localized. It can, however spread into the tree (especially a weakened tree). Death is inevitable if the infection reaches the roots. Pears are ...


11

If you had a large number and were more used to the tree, I'd suggest simply tasting the apples to see if they were ready to your liking (some like an apple that's more tart). Since you have a small number, you might consider a few options: Find a ripening chart for your area. Here in south central PA there are a couple large nurseries that have charts ...


11

The Victoria Plum is self-fertile and, although cropping can be improved by a compatible pollination partner, it should fruit satisfactorily without one. There are a number of possible reasons why your tree is not producing any fruit: It may be too young; plum trees usually start cropping when they are 4 or 5 years old, depending on the rootstock that has ...


11

Depending on where you live there could be a compatible cherry near enough that you will get fruit. Fortunately there are good resources out there to find good pollinators for stone fruit. Typically the male part of the flower will become active at a different part of time than the female part, to help eliminate self pollination, so variety X may be suitable ...


11

Every bud can become a shoot/branch. If you don't want branches where buds appear (like on the trunk close to the ground), just rub them off. If you've waited so long that they are now shoots that you don't want, remove them with your pruner. That's all there is to it. Fruit trees are frequently grafted to roots of a different variety, or even a different ...


11

This plant is variegated and is likely to be Citrus limon 'Eureka Variegated Pink'. Described by the New York Times as A mutant found on an ordinary Eureka lemon tree in Burbank, Calif., around 1930, its immature fruit has green and white stripes; the older fruit loses the stripes and develops flesh pigmented pink from lycopene, which also colors ...


11

A picture would be nice. If the trees are young, they may not yet have an extensive enough root system and canopy to support all the fruit so you end up with lots of small fruit rather then larger specimens. And do you want growth wasted when they drop prematurely as the tree sheds those it can't support? Another reason is that low lying branches laden with ...


10

Although I haven't come across this problem myself, I have done some research and would say, judging from the first (smaller) photo, that this is probably a magnesium deficiency, to which citrus trees are fairly prone: Mg -- Always on the oldest leaves first. Bottom center of the leaf is green, and the end and sides are yellow or orange, making an ...


10

Chilling requirements for figs are about 100 hours under 45°F. Pecans, about 500 hours under 45. Peaches range from 300 to 1000 hours. Here's a chart of Florida with approximate chilling hours per year. It has counties in faint gray, so you should be able to pick out where you live. You might like to look at the newer hardiness charts. The new chart was ...


10

First, I'm no expert on fruit or nut trees... Second, the below information comes from what I've been told by people who know (or at least, I believed they knew what they were talking about), what I know and from doing some research on the internet. Listed below are when you should expect to start seeing those trees start producing: Pecan - takes a ...


10

I have recently acquired a weed torch, which allows me to kill weeds without chemicals. It is essentially a blow torch run by propane. I would recommend the same model I am using http://www.amazon.com/Red-Dragon-VT-2-23-000-BTU/dp/B00004Z2FP/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1315411041&sr=8-2 You have to be careful around the fruit trees, but the cone of heat ...


10

Based on the information you have given, the most likely cause of the leaf problems is transplant shock compounded by overwatering. A photo and some information about where the seedling came from would be helpful for refining this assessment. When a plant is transplanted, it loses a portion of its root system. Similarly, overwatering also damages the roots. ...


10

I'm no scientist or horticultural expert, the below is just my take on how compost works when used as a mulch layer. "My take" comes from experience (for what that's worth), listening to people I respect and admire, reading -- both information that aligns with my beliefs on the subject and with information that I don't necessarily agree with. Compost slowly ...


10

I would suggest: Lack of sunlight I notice it's right next to a fence corner and suspect there's not enough sunlight getting through to this one for it to thrive. I'm not sure what to suggest as a solution for that. Possible magnesium deficiency (pretty common in Australian citrus trees) or some other mineral deficiency in soil I also notice, on close ...


10

Unless they have passed the stage of bud swelling, they should be okay at 12F (as discussed by Clemson and NCSU extension). Methods used to actively protect a tree from low temperatures work best under calm clear conditions. Under these conditions, an inversion layer occurs - this is a relatively stable cold air mass at the surface with warmer air above. ...


10

Apple trees do well in clay. There are a few things you could do different next time: do not put stones or other soil amendments in the bottom of the hole. If the planting hole has reached the clay sub soil or pan then plant it high or "proud" as described here. The addition of organic matter provides little or no advantage to the planting hole in ...


10

In Northeast Indiana, you're in zone 5. There should actually be quite a lot of stone fruit trees that do well for you, depending on your soil. Stone fruit trees tend to be short-lived in our climate. In my opinion, they're still worth trying. Sour cherries should do very well for you. Montmorency is an easy one to find that does well in zone 5, but North ...


10

When you say 'recent', if that means within the last year, the only thing you need to do is keep it well watered during dry spells for its first 2-3 years. Hopefully you dug the soil over well and added organic composted materials prior to planting - if you didn't, you could mulch round the bottom of the tree with something like composted animal manure this ...


10

Based on the way the fruit is clustered, and similarly the way the leaves are clustered. I think what you have is Psidium cattleyanum. Common names include: Cattley guava, strawberry guava, and cherry guava. There's a similar type, Ugni molinae (chiliean quava), but I think the fruits look more like cherries as they have longer stems. Strawberry guava ...


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