21

Some trees have a single "gender" but many do not. The way to tell is to see if the male (pollen) parts are present on separate flowers on different trees from the "female" (ovary - ie, infant fruit) parts. Also, you should be aware that issues with pollination may not always be related to needing both "male" and "female" trees around - sometimes a tree ...


15

Most citrus trees are grafted onto a different rootstock, usually sweet orange these days, even if the fruit from the top graft is going to be lemon or lime. The only way a lemon tree can completely turn into an orange tree is if the grafted part has died and the rootstock then grows on its own, producing the fruit its programmed to produce, depending on the ...


15

That is lichen, which is not detrimental to your tree's health (it's not a parasite, it lives off of photosynthesis). This is normal, no need to worry.


11

Depending on where you live there could be a compatible cherry near enough that you will get fruit. Fortunately there are good resources out there to find good pollinators for stone fruit. Typically the male part of the flower will become active at a different part of time than the female part, to help eliminate self pollination, so variety X may be suitable ...


11

Every bud can become a shoot/branch. If you don't want branches where buds appear (like on the trunk close to the ground), just rub them off. If you've waited so long that they are now shoots that you don't want, remove them with your pruner. That's all there is to it. Fruit trees are frequently grafted to roots of a different variety, or even a different ...


11

This plant is variegated and is likely to be Citrus limon 'Eureka Variegated Pink'. Described by the New York Times as A mutant found on an ordinary Eureka lemon tree in Burbank, Calif., around 1930, its immature fruit has green and white stripes; the older fruit loses the stripes and develops flesh pigmented pink from lycopene, which also colors ...


11

A picture would be nice. If the trees are young, they may not yet have an extensive enough root system and canopy to support all the fruit so you end up with lots of small fruit rather then larger specimens. And do you want growth wasted when they drop prematurely as the tree sheds those it can't support? Another reason is that low lying branches laden with ...


10

I live in USDA zone 6b (Southeastern Pennsylvania), and Pawpaws are native growers here. Cold shouldn't be an issue in 6b, but winter length may have some effect. They don't do well in really long winters. As for the conditions. Soil: What I've noticed is that these don't like compacted soil at all. Lawns are not best. Even a mowed meadow can have ...


10

Apple trees do well in clay. There are a few things you could do different next time: do not put stones or other soil amendments in the bottom of the hole. If the planting hole has reached the clay sub soil or pan then plant it high or "proud" as described here. The addition of organic matter provides little or no advantage to the planting hole in ...


10

In Northeast Indiana, you're in zone 5. There should actually be quite a lot of stone fruit trees that do well for you, depending on your soil. Stone fruit trees tend to be short-lived in our climate. In my opinion, they're still worth trying. Sour cherries should do very well for you. Montmorency is an easy one to find that does well in zone 5, but North ...


10

When you say 'recent', if that means within the last year, the only thing you need to do is keep it well watered during dry spells for its first 2-3 years. Hopefully you dug the soil over well and added organic composted materials prior to planting - if you didn't, you could mulch round the bottom of the tree with something like composted animal manure this ...


10

Based on the way the fruit is clustered, and similarly the way the leaves are clustered. I think what you have is Psidium cattleyanum. Common names include: Cattley guava, strawberry guava, and cherry guava. There's a similar type, Ugni molinae (chiliean quava), but I think the fruits look more like cherries as they have longer stems. Strawberry guava ...


10

Dry leaves should be shredded first as otherwise they might form an impenetrable mat in your compost pile. If you don't have a shredder, it's easiest to just collect a pile of leaves and run the lawn mower over it a few times. This provides the "browns" or high carbon material for your pile. Composting uses bacteria to break down the organic material. ...


10

Since woodpeckers don't eat wood, concentrate on killing the insects that the woodpeckers are actually eating (rather than "keeping the woodpeckers away" by some means other than removing their food source.) Though if the tree is as described, I'd also suggest taking scions to graft to new rootstocks as it may be in serious trouble and at least that way you'...


10

My experience is different. It is very easy to have a apple tree from seed. But apple trees are not auto-fertile. This mean that to have apple on a tree, you need pollen from an other trees (and other varieties). There are tables about which varieties could pollinate which other variety, so different variety is not always enough. To complicate things, you ...


9

I think it's actually a Tung tree.


9

I'm not an expert on the subject, but here is my understanding. In nature, a lemon tree will never turn into an orange tree as they are completely different species: Lemon - Genus: Citrus Species: C. × limon Orange - Genus: Citrus Species: C. × sinensis There does exist a hybrid cross called a Meyer Lemon: Meyer lemon - Genus: Citrus Species: C. × ...


9

This site from Washington State University offers a wealth of information about apples and their uses. You'll find a long list of apple varieties, including type descriptions and whether they're best used for long storage; eating; cooking, as in pies and applesauce; and cider. I don't know where you live, and some of these are regionalized to western United ...


9

You definitely need to do some pruning. Before you start pruning a tree, you should find all of the graft points. Since you have multi-graft trees, there should be one graft at the point where each main branch comes off of the trunk. As you are pruning, keep in mind that if you cut a grafted branch off or cut it back so close to this graft that it will have ...


9

You won't find what you're looking for because that information doesn't exist. Planting of fruit trees is done according to how they're going to be trained and pruned, so, if you were growing trees cordon style, then you'd plant much closer together. If you're not intending to train or regularly prune your trees, then your guide to planting distance, one ...


8

I volunteered at a heritage garden (shameless plug for a place worth visiting) that had old crab apple and their bark did exfoliate or peel in little scales about two inches high by an inch wide. This is normal for mature crab apple and apple trees. What is in your pictures doesn't look like a mature tree with a trunk over eight inches in diameter and ...


8

I'm wondering if its a form of quince - Chaenomeles japonica. Has thorny branches, fruit is produced virtually stalkless, branches are quite dark in colour, drops its leaves in winter. Does grow in your USDA zone, although fruit production is sometimes compromised for various reasons to do with climate (fruit split, late cold killing the flowers before ...


8

That's a difficult question, I never saw someone with parrots problem... I think that this problem is solved with parrots as any other birds... so I would wrap the trees with a net (which could be expensive) or try to get them away with CDs acting as scarecrow. I know that there are ecological repellents for pigeons, but I don't know if it works with ...


8

Looks like an attack by Fruit Fly - the female burrows into the fruits and lays her eggs, which then hatch and eat their way out. The droplets on the exterior of the fruit are characteristic of such an attack, although sometimes they may just look like small dimples in the fruits. I can see something white on the left side of the cut fruit - not sure what ...


8

My understanding of nitrogen fixing plants is that nitrogen is retained by the plant for it's own use. Farmers will sow clover and legumes but to make the nitrogen accessible they plow it in. This is called green manure and works well for fields with annual crops. I see a problem with your idea due to the long term nature of an apple tree. The clover will ...


8

The traditional way to do this is to buy an apple tree which is grafted onto a dwarfing root stock such as E.M.26. You can keep fruit trees smaller but it's more work without the right rootstock. Keep in mind that even semi dwarf rootstock will "grow to be twice as tall as the average person". Things you can do are listed here but can be summarized as: ...


8

There is so much genetic variation in the genus Prunus that each seed will produce a different tree and the only way to be sure of the outcome of the fruit is to grow clones from a mother plant. Based on the size of those fruits I'd say it's probably a seed grown individual and you won't find any like it. The good news, however, is that anything in the ...


8

The end of your seed with a lighter area on top is called the eye, place the seed with its eye facing up. Cover the seed with half an inch (1.27 centimeters) of soil. The seed should sprout within a few weeks. Water your plant with lukewarm water whenever you see the soil is a bit dry. Mangos don't need a lot of water.


8

Many apples fruit from multi-year-old "spurs" - specialized branches that mostly grow the clusters of flower buds. It sounds to me like you may have accidentally pruned a lot of your fruiting spurs off with the water sprouts and other extra branches.


8

If you're using 25 gallons of water, you are using only 25% the amount of water on the mixing instructions, so use only 25% the amount of concentrate, around 1-2 quarts. Application rate is 100-800 gallons of mix per acre, but with only a dozen or so trees you're looking at significantly less than an acre. Figure out how much of an acre you're working with ...


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