22

Well, basically, the perched table is the saturation point, where the capillary action in the soil is canceled out by the force of gravity. Every type of growing media has a different perched table. Capillary action will pull water up from a certain point, and below that point, gravity keeps the water from moving up. The size of the container does not affect ...


11

The black bugs are the larvae of ladybugs. They are there to eat the aphids. As larvae or adults ladybugs are efficient beneficial predators. There is no need to wash them away they are working for you! I wonder if you have other plants that have aphids. Some adults have wings and fly to new hosts. Check your other plants for aphids. As they are soft ...


11

If you can't have a compost heap, you can direct compost by digging down at least six inches into open ground, burying the kitchen scraps (not cooked food or meat), then covering back up with the soil. However, this isn't really possible in a pot - the scraps would be inserted amongst the plant roots, and every time you want to add a scrap or two, you'll be ...


11

There are a couple of problems with your description of how you're going to plant this tree. First, no plant should be planted less than a foot (as a minimum) away from a fence or wall, so if you mean the rootball when you say 'sit tightly' next to a fence, as the topgrowth continues to expand, it will all lean forwards to get away from the fence behind it ...


10

In addition to acidity (probably not a problem), and very slow calcium release, I'm going to offer a hypothesis as to why she does it... Crushed eggshells are sometimes used as organic methods of deterring certain pests, especially gastropods such as snails and slugs (see this question). Gastropods are unlikely to be a problem in indoor pots, but perhaps ...


10

You can grow almost anything in a pot or vase but some of the issues are: if there are no drainage holes in the bottom and you plant in soil there is a risk of root rot. Even if you have a drainage layer and soil separator it is tricky to maintain just the right amount of soil moisture. many plants are quite happy to grow in water. This is easy if there ...


10

Too much water, most likely, for one thing, could be combined with poor drainage depending on the details of the pot and soil mix. Probably some other things [planting depth?] to not get any tomato seedlings (I gather that you "planted tomatoes" [fruit] rather than transplanting tomato plants) such as excessively cool temperatures or not noticing the ...


9

A good soil mix for pot grown blueberries is a porous, acidic mix high in organic matter. A good mix could be made by mixing these materials by weight: 5/8 topsoil 2/8 peat moss 1/16 vermiculite 1/16 coarse sand Plus some slow release plant food. To help with the acidity, mix 1/4 pound of aluminum sulfate into the top 6" of soil. There are several mulches ...


9

Yes, they have a good chance - as my Mum has proven multiple times. Because she was always very busy, she just put the entire root ball into the ground, no further fussing. Admittedly, she just couldn't stand the idea of throwing healthy plants on the compost just because they were done flowering (she never bought them, but was given them as a gift - instead ...


9

That's a small pot, and definitely not ideal. I recommend as much larger of a container as you can manage, even if you have to sacrifice drainage to make room. However, you can grow some kinds of tomatoes in small pots (but the harvest may be modest). I've grown Galapagos Island (Solanum cheesmaniae) tomatoes in a foam cup, which produced four fruits indoors ...


9

From what I understand, ficus is a pretty hardy tree. The way a bonsai works is that people either collect a bonsai from the wild, grow one, find a nursery plant that will work (either a random nursery or specialty bonsai nursery), or you purchase/receive an already started bonsai. They are put into bigger containers or even the ground to encourage growth, ...


8

My mother in law liked to put eggshells (not crushed much) at the bottom of pots when repotting. Served the dual purpose of drainage (as some people might use gravel) and possibly providing calcium. With the added bonus that eggshells are easier to come by than gravel for many people. At the top of the pot I doubt it would do anything much. I'm not really ...


8

Don't know much about gardening but I happen to know something about ceramics. If you look at the history of ceramics e.g. vases or urns from the classical world, you will see that virtually all traditional/pre-industrial are some variant of a round cone. This is because the firing of ceramics creates enormous compressive pressure on skin/surface of the ...


8

In response to those up-thread who seem to think that peat extraction in Canada is not a big deal, I have to say: I have stood on the edge of Provincial Area of Natural and Scientific Interest (ANSI) in southern Ontario and watched the peat being extracted. It broke my heart. The bog in question lay just outside the border of a Provincial Park, and the ...


8

If you make the pots out of newspaper (black & white only is the best -- definitely not glossy/coated), and the plants aren't overgrown, then just plant the pots in the ground. Newsprint will rot away quickly. If the plants are large (starting to become root bound in the pots), it wouldn't hurt to slash the paper a bit when planting so that the roots ...


8

Not much composting will happen inside that bucket. It's also far too small -- we'd fill that bucket a couple times a week in the winter, maybe daily in the summer. Your kitchen habits may be different than ours, but my point is that you're going to fill it eventually and then you'll need someplace to put the compost. Also, an outdoor compost pile needs to ...


8

Yes, I have had quite a bit of success using 25 litre buckets on my balcony, planting some plants "upside down" and others at the top of the bucket. I cut a small hole in the bottom of the bucket and gently push the roots of my seedling through the hole. I keep the roots in place with a small square of landscaping fabric with a slit cut into one side, or ...


8

I had no problem with them disintegrating, probably because I packed them tightly in a seed tray. However I found that fungus grew and spread quickly through the pots. I prefer giving the seedlings plenty of time before transplanting - if I planted on as soon as they sprouted it might be a different story.


8

Grubs like the one you've pictured feed on plant roots. If there are a lot of them, then yes, they are doing damage. You may just not be noticing it yet. The worst part is they will eventually pupate into adult beetles, and those will work on damaging the above-ground parts of your plants. If they are Japanese Beetles (hard to say without more info but the ...


8

Yes, transition shock to a degree, it should have been hardened off before being left out all the time, not only to acclimatize to colder, variable temperatures after being indoors for some time, but also to get used to direct sunlight on its leaves. It is not, however, dead - turn it out of its pot, split or select live parts from what's there, removing ...


8

In many cases, it is simply for convenience. However; there are some plants which do not tolerate transplanting. Therefore, to start seeds indoors to get a head start and/ or maximize their strong stocks, people use peat pots so they can transfer them outdoors without transplantation. One noted example of an intolerant plant is corn.


8

My potato bag is one square foot in diameter, and just under 2 foot high. You have 16 square feet in your bed so you could potentially plant one seed potato ( or part of one with at least 3 eyes ) per square foot. One foot deep is about the minimum you can go. Assuming you have good drainage, and you're using a well fertilized soil, you can plant each ...


8

All plants should have pots matching the plant size, otherwise you risk root-bound plants or trouble with watering. That's why we re-pot as needed and only go up a few pot sizes at a time. Roses like to go deep with their roots, so I would aim for a pot of ca. 5 cm / 2 inches height right now, once the seedling is established, take it from there. ...


8

Your Bonsai will grow bigger if it roots deeper and that appears to be happening. The good news is the Bonsai survived the cat! Bonsai will need pruning of roots at some point, so transferring is not as bad as you think. You can do this carefully, and transfer the Bonsai back to a smaller pot. You might want to prune both the roots and the shoots.


7

Crop rotation My grandparents had а large garden beside the vineyard, that they cared about long years. Every spring, they reshaped the garden - putting the tomatoes, cucumbers, pumpkins, carrots, onion, cabbage and other goodies in new places. They told me this is because every plant uses some same assortiment of nutrients in the soil. Planting the same ...


7

In addition to keeping any sprouts wet while waiting to plant, you should thoroughly saturate the pot itself just prior to putting in the ground. It is also recommended that you "tear away the bottom half of the pot before placing the plant in its hole to exposes some roots to direct contact with the soil.(source)" On the latter step I am not 100% sure it ...


7

This page offered some good advice. Basically: Any breakable ceramic pots, try placing them in an open-toped box, cushioned with bubble-wrap or a towel or something to protect the pot. If possible, replant into plastic containers so they don't break. Anything tall, wrap it in some bubble wrap or plastic to protect it. Also make sure it has some holes to ...


7

Yes, in a pot you can bring it outdoors when it is warm and bring it indoors while it is cold. Tea is a zone 6 plant so it is relatively hardy and durable. It should survive your winter inside similar to how you would overwinter other plants.


7

This is essentially a pot without drainage. Most herbs do not like to sit in wet soil so you need to have a drainage layer and a soil separator topped with a soil or soil less mix. Here are the things I have used for a drainage layer: peastone gravel - attractive but heavy styrofoam peanuts - light, colorful but maybe not what you want near something you ...


7

Two things - I'm wondering whether you're going to use these trays just for starting seeds, and will be transplanting into other containers or the ground later, or whether you're intending to try to get something to grow permanently in them. If the latter, it won't work, they're not deep enough I'm afraid. The other thing that sprang to mind was the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible