21

Well, basically, the perched table is the saturation point, where the capillary action in the soil is canceled out by the force of gravity. Every type of growing media has a different perched table. Capillary action will pull water up from a certain point, and below that point, gravity keeps the water from moving up. The size of the container does not affect ...


11

The black bugs are the larvae of ladybugs. They are there to eat the aphids. As larvae or adults ladybugs are efficient beneficial predators. There is no need to wash them away they are working for you! I wonder if you have other plants that have aphids. Some adults have wings and fly to new hosts. Check your other plants for aphids. As they are soft ...


11

If you can't have a compost heap, you can direct compost by digging down at least six inches into open ground, burying the kitchen scraps (not cooked food or meat), then covering back up with the soil. However, this isn't really possible in a pot - the scraps would be inserted amongst the plant roots, and every time you want to add a scrap or two, you'll be ...


11

There are a couple of problems with your description of how you're going to plant this tree. First, no plant should be planted less than a foot (as a minimum) away from a fence or wall, so if you mean the rootball when you say 'sit tightly' next to a fence, as the topgrowth continues to expand, it will all lean forwards to get away from the fence behind it ...


10

You can grow almost anything in a pot or vase but some of the issues are: if there are no drainage holes in the bottom and you plant in soil there is a risk of root rot. Even if you have a drainage layer and soil separator it is tricky to maintain just the right amount of soil moisture. many plants are quite happy to grow in water. This is easy if there ...


10

Too much water, most likely, for one thing, could be combined with poor drainage depending on the details of the pot and soil mix. Probably some other things [planting depth?] to not get any tomato seedlings (I gather that you "planted tomatoes" [fruit] rather than transplanting tomato plants) such as excessively cool temperatures or not noticing the ...


9

Yes, they have a good chance - as my Mum has proven multiple times. Because she was always very busy, she just put the entire root ball into the ground, no further fussing. Admittedly, she just couldn't stand the idea of throwing healthy plants on the compost just because they were done flowering (she never bought them, but was given them as a gift - instead ...


9

That's a small pot, and definitely not ideal. I recommend as much larger of a container as you can manage, even if you have to sacrifice drainage to make room. However, you can grow some kinds of tomatoes in small pots (but the harvest may be modest). I've grown Galapagos Island (Solanum cheesmaniae) tomatoes in a foam cup, which produced four fruits indoors ...


9

From what I understand, ficus is a pretty hardy tree. The way a bonsai works is that people either collect a bonsai from the wild, grow one, find a nursery plant that will work (either a random nursery or specialty bonsai nursery), or you purchase/receive an already started bonsai. They are put into bigger containers or even the ground to encourage growth, ...


8

Grubs like the one you've pictured feed on plant roots. If there are a lot of them, then yes, they are doing damage. You may just not be noticing it yet. The worst part is they will eventually pupate into adult beetles, and those will work on damaging the above-ground parts of your plants. If they are Japanese Beetles (hard to say without more info but the ...


8

Yes, transition shock to a degree, it should have been hardened off before being left out all the time, not only to acclimatize to colder, variable temperatures after being indoors for some time, but also to get used to direct sunlight on its leaves. It is not, however, dead - turn it out of its pot, split or select live parts from what's there, removing ...


8

In many cases, it is simply for convenience. However; there are some plants which do not tolerate transplanting. Therefore, to start seeds indoors to get a head start and/ or maximize their strong stocks, people use peat pots so they can transfer them outdoors without transplantation. One noted example of an intolerant plant is corn.


8

My potato bag is one square foot in diameter, and just under 2 foot high. You have 16 square feet in your bed so you could potentially plant one seed potato ( or part of one with at least 3 eyes ) per square foot. One foot deep is about the minimum you can go. Assuming you have good drainage, and you're using a well fertilized soil, you can plant each ...


8

All plants should have pots matching the plant size, otherwise you risk root-bound plants or trouble with watering. That's why we re-pot as needed and only go up a few pot sizes at a time. Roses like to go deep with their roots, so I would aim for a pot of ca. 5 cm / 2 inches height right now, once the seedling is established, take it from there. ...


8

Your Bonsai will grow bigger if it roots deeper and that appears to be happening. The good news is the Bonsai survived the cat! Bonsai will need pruning of roots at some point, so transferring is not as bad as you think. You can do this carefully, and transfer the Bonsai back to a smaller pot. You might want to prune both the roots and the shoots.


7

This is essentially a pot without drainage. Most herbs do not like to sit in wet soil so you need to have a drainage layer and a soil separator topped with a soil or soil less mix. Here are the things I have used for a drainage layer: peastone gravel - attractive but heavy styrofoam peanuts - light, colorful but maybe not what you want near something you ...


7

Crop rotation My grandparents had а large garden beside the vineyard, that they cared about long years. Every spring, they reshaped the garden - putting the tomatoes, cucumbers, pumpkins, carrots, onion, cabbage and other goodies in new places. They told me this is because every plant uses some same assortiment of nutrients in the soil. Planting the same ...


7

Two things - I'm wondering whether you're going to use these trays just for starting seeds, and will be transplanting into other containers or the ground later, or whether you're intending to try to get something to grow permanently in them. If the latter, it won't work, they're not deep enough I'm afraid. The other thing that sprang to mind was the ...


7

I'm not an expert on house plants - strictly an outdoor plant grower but here's what I know is for certain: The water in your rubber tree's saucer is evaporating just like it is in all the other plants' saucers. There's just more water there than you think there should be. Now, some questions I would have are: How's the moisture level in the soil ...


7

I think there is no easy rules beyond knowing the size of the adult plant. However, there are rules that can help you know when you have to change the pot with a larger one. If you can see many roots coming out of the drainage holes of pots. If the soil dries out very soon. If the plant has stopped growing and you know for sure that can become larger. ...


7

If you're having a drought, I'd say you'll be fine using it for a short period of time. You mentioned adding salt; this will build up in containers every day you use it, and eventually will harm the plant. Don't use for prolonged periods, and dilute it if possible, as far as possible. Pasta water contains residue full of carbohydrates, so the bacterial ...


7

Looking at the measurements of your garden bed, it sounds like square foot gardening. And yes, potatoes are included in that method, one seed per square, so sixteen for your bed. One issue with potatoes is depth: For a good harvest the emerging sprouts are covered with soil to encourage more root mass and more tubers. In "standard" gardening, this is ...


7

This technique is used by commercial growers for tree and shrub production the pots you use should be identical and readily available in bulk quantities sandy soil is probably not the best if you are growing trees as it will shift in high winds ready access to water. Plant material using this method can dry out faster and a drip or bubbler irrigation system ...


7

Asparagus roots can extend down about 12 feet. The need to develop such an extensive root system is one of the reasons that you should leave it alone for the first 3 years before harvesting. So, it's not practical to grow asparagus in containers.


7

In addition to Bamboo's answer. General kitchen waste also decomposes rapidly and resulting in considerable heat production which can damage the root. It can also induce the proliferation of decomposers temporarily and they will use up some of the nutrients in the original soil.


7

First, cow dung doesn't have a very high level of nitrogen, specially compared to other forms of manure - the problem with fresh cow dung is a very high ammonia level, but if its dried in heat or sun, the ammonia should be significantly reduced, along with any serious pathogens present. NPK levels for average cow manure are roughly 3-2-1, with some trace ...


7

Well, the correct way to conserve water is to watch your water, and make sure you don't have excess drainage. This of course takes time and experience. Till then, use measuring cups, or watering jugs that have measurements on them. Or, if watering with a hose, time yourself. A kitchen timer for example, can come in handy. Unless you have different soils ...


7

I haven't found any good reference sources, so this is just my personal experience. It ended up being too long for a comment, so I hope it's appropriate as an answer. I do this frequently, with both my indoor and outdoor potted plants. Especially outdoors, I tend to be lazy, so if I've already put away the hose or watering can, and notice something ...


7

This plant is an Aspidastra elatior, a native of Taiwan, which has been in cultivation as an indoor plant for hundreds of years. Common names include the cast iron plant which describes how tough it is. It can be grown outdoors in tropical climates where it might produce a maroon flower. You can grow this plant in very low light, low humidity and not much ...


7

Potting soil also gets compressed over time. The most important thing about potting soil is that it shouln't contain fungus spores, insect eggs and weeds. I say "it shouldn't" because I have bought potting soil with earthworms and some germinated seeds, probably weeds, but not sure since I have removed them immediatly. Also, potting soil has a label that ...


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