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The structure looks good, maybe the roots have remained too wet from the rain: even if theres 2 or 3 cm of gravel under the soil for drainage & aereation, the soil many have compacted around it from the rain resulting in inadequate drainage & aereation. And if applying a granular type of nutrien, there might be excessive nutrient dissolved too ...


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Maybe just be a bit patient; It takes a couple weeks for them to stabilise; the way they were put in matters too. If the roots were sort of loosened then they should be ok, as long as some good soil is well around them, watered in etc. The tomatoes(likely) & peppers flowering is a good sign, just kept them adequately watered, without ever really drying ...


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Good clear question & information. Yes, something seems to have messed them up, green is ok, they seem adequately watered, dont seem wilted. soil.If they can take it, try watering them a bit more. Also, if theyve been fertilized recently, maybe try skim that off & replace that soil with good plain soil, and water well. too much nutrient can overwhelm ...


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They look quite healthy, which is important. Interesting that there is rather emphatic information about suckers, but that its sort of incomplete. Thats the way they grow, there isnt much that can be done if there simply isnt enough space, but they dont seem too dense, so may be able to wind them back carefully and retain more of them: whether or not the new ...


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Yes. I have posted similar questions and sadly have experience with this. Sorry for the bad news. Curled leaves is one thing, but when they are super dense and leathery like that, I have full belief that is herbicide damage. I cover my tomato plants when I spray my lawn with a hand sprayer. Even on days with no wind, the invisible vapor can damage ...


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If you purchased the plants from a box store or from a nursery that does not raise its own stock, then it's possible your plants had too much growth inhibitor applied to them. This link shows a commercial product that is used to treat plants for better shipping. If I'm right, it's possible that the plants will eventually metabolize (if that's the word I want....


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If you are really concerned about the temperature in your conservatory, you can get a greenhouse shade to put up. They are usually a mesh cloth that adds some shade inside the greenhouse or conservatory which helps drop the temperature. Most regular greenhouse shades are inexpensive and widely available online. I have seen some expensive greenhouse shades ...


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Your tomato plant is likely suffering from more than one problem. Over fertilizing and over watering. Unfortunately, fertilizer will NOT cure a unhealthy plant. It just causes more harm. Fertilizer should only be used on healthy plants that are growing vigorously. Even then, I always recommend that you use only 1/3 of the strength in the directions on the ...


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Unfortunately, you're not going to get a straight answer on this question but I'll try to help you. Yellowing leaves are typically caused by a nutrient deficiency.... However, yellowing leaves can be caused by under watering or over watering, under fertilizing or over fertilizing. It can be a fungus issue like blight or a virus caused by white flies etc. To ...


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There are more than one cause for this symptom, but from your description, it seems you may be water >>too<< frequently. For almost all plants, grass, etc. best watering approach is to soak them well >>infrequently<< and thereby help encourage root growth/expansion, increasing overall hardiness of the plant. Repeat thoutrough ...


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I would definitely trim the yellowing branches as you want to have nice airflow through the plants to make sure you don't develop fungus. Keep in mind its a balance (art vs. science), as the leaves are needed for photosynthesis which feeds the plant so you don't want to take too much off. In your case, the yellowing leaves are most likely safe to remove ...


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Curling leaves on a tomato plant can be caused by several things: It can be a viral infection transmitted by white flies (I'm not sure if you see anything like white flies near your plants?) Tomato plants can also be triggered into a defense mode caused by certain environment conditions such as excessive high temperatures, uneven watering, or long periods ...


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Trimming those branches is more of a personal preference than something you should or shouldn't do. If it was my tomato plant, I would trim branches 1 and 2 right now, and wait until branch 3 is fully yellow to trim it. To me, it looks better and it prevents diseases from spreading. To treat the blossom end rot, I say that you should pick up a bottle of Cal-...


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It looks like you just sprayed the leaves with too much pressure, and it physically damaged them. That happens even more easily with watermelon, but it'll happen with tomatoes, too, if you have enough pressure (the problem intensifies as the range gets closer). If the pests are aphids, you don't need high pressure to get rid of them with water. You just need ...


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It looks like they may have gotten sprayed with something toxic to them, like a cleaner or disinfectant....it looks like it killed part of the stem. That's a possible cause, the effect is some die-off of stem tissues, regardless of how. Tomatoes will root all along the stems where they are in contact with soil. I've even rooted cuttings as an experiment....


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It's impossible to say if it is an accurate number. The number you actually get could be anything between 200 and zero, if you get hit by disease or whatever. Seed merchants usually quote the maximum crop you are likely to get, for the obvious reason, and you never know whether bloggers are writing from their own experience or just copying something they ...


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