20

A few months ago I called my local nursery to ask if they carried ammonium sulfate. He said "Oh, you want aluminum sulfate to acidify the soil for blueberries." I cringed in horror that this advice is being dispensed so regularly. Is aluminum a nutrient or do plants use aluminum in any way? Aluminum is not known to be a nutrient for plant ...


10

Actually it's a simple question and I'll give you a simple answer too ;-) With "water soluble" they mean, "able to dilute with water before applying". In the soil, every fertilizer is probably soluble with water, but fertilizer is not depending on water to be taken up by the roots. Water is for distribution of nutrients like fertilizer and aeration of the ...


10

Dry leaves should be shredded first as otherwise they might form an impenetrable mat in your compost pile. If you don't have a shredder, it's easiest to just collect a pile of leaves and run the lawn mower over it a few times. This provides the "browns" or high carbon material for your pile. Composting uses bacteria to break down the organic material. ...


10

Yes, you can use it, in lesser quantities. About the second question: the reason why we have not 33-34-33: These number are the percent of weight of N,P, and K. For example, N is a gas, so we need some molecules which includes N (it is impossible to have a solid 100, 0, 0 fertilizer) . Such molecules could include C, H, O, S, (and maybe other atoms). So ...


9

Here is the general rule-of-thumb I use to identify nutrient deficiences in plants. Deficiencies indicated by symptoms appearing first on older leaves chlorosis starting from leaf tips, later leaves turn yellowish-brown: N reddish/purple discoloration on green leaves or stalks: P leaves with brown necrotic margins and/or spots: K stripe chlorosis, mainly ...


9

Water the pots thoroughly with distilled water. Most distillation processes remove the dissolved elements in water. As this water flows through the soil that is saturated with fertilizer ions it will attract and remove them. Of course you are still left with a stressed plant with leaf burn. Success is not guaranteed....


9

You don't need any fertiliser at all to start with - the clue is in the word 'starter'. You're only meant to germinate the seeds, then wait till they have 2/3 sets of leaves (one cotyledon pair and one true leaves), at which point you move them into individual pots containing probably seed and cutting compost - then move them up into potting compost in ...


9

An important thing that many people miss is that if a cover crop produces fruit and seed (beans in your case) it is no longer a cover crop or green manure, but a crop, which depletes the soil rather than rebuilding it. That is, all the nitrogen a legume has put into the soil during the growth stage, is consumed by the plant during the fruiting stage. So if ...


9

You're going to be dripping partially treated effluent onto the ground near some fruit trees. The main concern is splash back of pathogenic bacteria onto some edible fruit. Though this risk is less when the fruit is in a tree, there is still some risk especially if someone picks fruit off the ground to consume. It's clearly more of a risk with vegetables ...


9

We get 30 litres of coffee grounds once a month from the local deli. We're on a list of people who take the stuff to stop it going into landfill. It just goes straight into our compost pile. Newly cooked grounds are sterile enough so can be used for growing some mushrooms, and they don't then get competition from other fungi. Some people use coffee ...


9

We say a plant is 'etiolated' when its growth becomes long and lanky, usually thin and weak looking, often yellowish or pale in colour, and with elongated gaps between leaves on stems, although this latter is not applicable to your particular plant. Your plant (Euphorbia enopla gets my vote for ID) is looking very healthy. From what you say, you are keeping ...


8

I have been using grounds as top dressing for tomatoes, garlic, onions, blueberries, roses, hibiscus, iris, strawberries, and evergreens for years, with great results. I use a "tea" of 1 coffee can-full (2lb can) of dry grounds in 5 gallons of water. I mix it Tuesday night, let it sit in the sunny backyard until Saturday, then strain it into my sprayer &...


8

You must not use Scotts Weed and Feed formulation now for two reasons - one, you've already applied a weedkiller to the entire lawn, and one of the active ingredients, 2,4D, is present in both formulations, which means you'll be overdosing on the weedkiller front. Second, where you live, your first frost date is early October, so feed should not be applied ...


8

On bedded plants, this won't hurt anything, In potted plants, there is a possibility of altering the pH levels, especially if fermented. Also, the decomposition process could sour the potting mix. And the nutrients gained will be very minimal (minuscule compared with a balanced extended release) Basically whether indoors or outdoors, if you don't have a ...


8

Normally with cover crops you want them to grow as long as possible, where possible is influenced by: When you plan to plant the actual crop (including some time for breakdown of the cover crop residues.) Is the cover crop about to set seed and become a weed through self-seeding? The tops/leaves are also valuable material - you can either incorporate them ...


8

Bear in mind that many commercial outlets do not actually grow trees in pots, they simply buy them in from a specialist supplier. The actual supplier will raise the saplings under controlled conditions (temperature, light, potting medium) usually under cover, and pesticide/fungicide treatments will be relentlessly used, many of which are not even available ...


8

Rock dust is used in organic gardening where basalt and granite is crushed into a fine powder. Bricks are made of clay, sand and lime and where limestone... is often deficient in the majority of essential macro-compounds, trace elements, and micronutrients Even if you did have access to a commercial rock crusher to crush your bricks they would not ...


8

I think you overwater the chilli plant. The leaves are not very healthy. Chilli likes also dry climate, so try to water a lot less. One or twice a week. I would also not put so much fertiliser. Once every two or three month should be enough (and possibly one every year, but possibly also changing the soil). Chilli doesn't produce a lot of green, or big ...


8

There is a lot of confusion on the subject of salt and fertilisers - when we hear 'salt' we think of the sort of salt that's used in food and which we wouldn't want on our plants, in the main. However, the term 'salts' (as opposed to salt) is a chemist's terminology for various elements in a particular form which are in fertilisers, particularly soluble ...


8

You are missing the fact that air is just as vital as an "external input" as light and water. Plants process carbon dioxide from the air directly, and specialist bacteria also convert nitrogen to forms useable by plants. (There is also a small amount of nitrogen converted by lightning strikes in the atmosphere, but that's probably not very important). ...


7

I have a tray in my kitchen lined with several newspaper sections. I dump out my coffee grounds & filters on it each day. The paper helps them dry out. When dry I transfer it to a bowl and collect it until I feel like using it. If I have a worm bin I put the whole mess in it once the grounds are cool and no longer sopping wet. Anyway, drying the ...


7

I take a bit of a different approach than J. Musser does (and here I am making an assumption based on the answer), but I agree with that approach when adding commercial fertilizer. Bagged fertilizer (e.g., 10-10-10) can be quite hard on young seedlings. J. Musser didn't specifically state the use of commercial fertilizer in that answer, but I believe that ...


7

Not unless you particularly fancy a dose of e-coli, worms, parasites and a host of other enteric nasties you could be infected with from using it. Generally speaking, manures from herbivores are okay, but even those must be composted prior to use, so composted animal manures are fine - but only if you're not growing root crops such as carrots or parsnips, ...


7

If you are going to do what you ask, use human and pet wastes to fertilize your 'fruits and vegetables', there are a couple of things to keep in mind: 1. Processing waste material Human wastes can and have been used to fertilize crops. The city of Milwaukee sells Milorganite to farmers, which is just processed human waste from the city. A good minimum ...


7

You certainly can try to grow a plant without using additional fertilizers. I think it's a fun experiment to grow the same plant using multiple setups to see what effect is had on the plant. To answer your question, yes the plant will need certain nutrient to thrive, but you don't necessarily have to give it Miracle Grow. On most plant food containers you'...


7

Usually, you would wait until the plants are in full flower, and have no ripe seeds, then cut/mow the tops down and turn them under. This will add the most nitrogen to the soil (the green tops are very high in Nitrogen), and the soil microorganism population will jump, increasing nutrient availability. In a raised bed, if you don't want to turn the tops ...


7

Sitting on soil allows worms and other critters to enter and exit the bottom of the bin. Also, I would think the drainage would be poor and you could get an anaerobic smelly mess at the bottom. As another alternative, I have had good experiences with http://geobin123.com/ . My mother has had one for almost a decade and it hasn't degraded at all. All of the ...


7

I've tried 2 bins similar to the picture on the left. They did not work well. They took a very long time to break down the compost. It was difficult to turn the pile because it was so small. They filled up way too fast because they were so small, and stayed full because they were inefficient. I ended up selling them both and using the money to buy wood to ...


7

I'm pretty sure they don't give them anything initially, although if the tree does not sell within a few months, I imagine they would give them slow release fertiliser appropriate to the plant - something with equal N-P-K values is, I believe, good for stone fruit. Note that as far as the health of the tree goes, its also that they have been planted in soil ...


7

Adding potash to the soil your Tumeric is growing in will not hurt it as long as it doesn't make the soil too alkaline. When potash is added to soil it acts as a source of potassium, and also shifts the soil to a higher (more alkaline) pH. Tumeric likes a pH between 6.0 and 7.8. If soil with potash becomes too alkaline, you can add decomposing organic ...


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