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21

If you manage your compost pile perfectly, it will heat up and kill the seeds. I've never managed my pile perfectly and there are always some seeds. Occasionally it's a happy thing -- last year we got a bunch of pumpkins from volunteer plants. Often it's a real pain: raspberry seeds left over from making jam are terrible; we don't put raspberry leftovers ...


17

Strictly speaking something like a sour orange is possible. A lot of things are possible really. Citrus hybridization can get very complicated. There are four 'parent species' of citrus (Citron, Pomelo, Papeda and Mandarin). A lemon is a cross between a Citron and a Sour Orange (which is itself a cross of a Mandarin and a Pomelo). So that's 3 parent species ...


16

It is possible to grow plants from the kernels you get for making popcorn, but remember this is a corn that isn't any good as sweet corn. it it very starchy and not sweet. it would only be good to use for more popcorn. Here is a quick tutorial on germinating the seed. In essence, what they recommend is the following: Get the plain kernels for home made ...


14

You're better off buying seeds from the rack in the front of the store. Potatoes are often treated to prevent sprouting. If you buy organic potatoes, they may sprout, but they may also be carrying diseases. Normally you'd want to buy certified disease-free "seed" potatoes. Garlic might also be treated to prevent sprouting, but planting the cloves might work....


14

The pistachios (Pistacia vera) that you buy at the grocery store are usually roasted and will not grow. They are a nice looking tree and only get about twenty feet or eight metres tall. Where you live is hot and dry with alkaline soil and not a lot of moisture in the spring. This is the just right for pistachios but.... Seed germination is most ...


14

Yes, all seeds have an average "life span", but the length varies between species and is greatly influenced by storage conditions like temperature, humidity and light. As a rule of thumb, dry, cool and dark, possibly in the original sealed package is the best way to store seeds. The standard garden veggie seeds should typically1 last at least two to three ...


13

If there isn't bindweed in your area don't be the person that imports it... There are a great many climbing plants, including morning glory, passion flower, honey suckle, trumpet vine, even Virginia creeper or hops... Do some research and find something suitable in your area.


13

They look like Lunaria (Money Plant) seeds to me. They could be one of many other species, but I'd bet on Money Plant. They're often traded because of their easy culture and their novelty factor. You won't know until you grow!


11

It sounds like your compost isn't breaking down all the way. Compost has to heat up and stay hot to kill seeds, and you need a full cubic yard or the pile won't really ever heat up. Even then, only the inside heats up -- you have to turn it periodically so that the compost on the outside moves to the inside where it can heat up, too. Our community compost ...


11

Sweet Million are an F1 variety, so will not come true. Seeds saved from their first year may grow what are known as F2 types, which may be quite close to the original F1 Sweet Million, but any seed saved from the second year will produce random tomatoes. More info here http://www.gardenfocused.co.uk/vegetable/tomato-outdoor/variety-sweet-million.php


10

Modern pistachio trees are simply not grown and then wait for the results. The nut you buy to eat will not germinate to produce a tree from which you can obtain more nuts. Trees are grafted onto a rootstock (either after plantation or in nursery stage) and the tree takes off from there... The rootstock seeds are notoriously hard to find and generally take ...


10

I know someone who started a seed business with a suburban garden and a kitchen table. You don't need a lot to start but you need drive and determination to stay in the business. Seed buyers want to buy seeds in uniform quantities that are cleaned and accurately named. If you want to grow your own seeds plant in quantity clean the seeds and test for ...


10

The aim of it is to mimic the action of a bird's intestines prior to pooing out the seed - many seeds which pass through a bird's digestive system germinate more readily, because the outer coating of the seed has been either thinned or softened as a result, making it easier for the seed to germinate. Chili pepper seeds (depending on variety) are known to be ...


10

Seed lasts quite a while. It is said at least 30 percent of your seed is non viable the next year but I've seen maybe 10 percent or really normal germination. Keep your excess seed in the dark, plenty of room between seeds, lots of air and between 40 and 55 degrees F. If you know your seeds are dry you can vacuum pack them. In two weeks plant another ...


9

I think morning glory seeds would do the job you wanted. They have no problems covering large areas and don't spread where they aren't wanted. I agree with @Tim planting bindweed is something you are likely to regret.


9

It is possible to do, but your results will vary. The stuff you buy for food popcorn isn't specifically grown for seed; it may be an F1 hybrid and the generation that you grow out may not produce the same as the parents. (This is probably what happened to @michelle -- she mentions that the results were unpredictable.) If you just want to try it as an ...


9

You determine how many you want to put based on the germination rate. You should perform a germination test to what percent of the seeds sprout. If half of the ones you sow sprout. Then you plant multiple seeds into a hole. Generally if you plant multiple seeds into a hole, if both plants grow out you will have to cut, kill or transplant the secondary (...


9

Well, seems you'll have a lot of thinning and pricking out to do if they all germinate. If you imagine each seed as a single mint plant, which needs 18-24 inches of space around it as it grows on, if all 50 of your seeds germinate, you will need to transplant each one into individual pots, so in theory, that's 50 pots. If you sow too thickly, or too many in ...


9

John McPhee wrote a very witty book on oranges, entitled, not surprisingly, 'Oranges'. One chapter recounts an effort to grow limes from seed, due to the pervasive presence of a virus in existing trees. Essentially, they grew hundreds of seedlings from limes, and got a tiny number of plants that grew limes. All the others produced some other citrus fruit. So,...


9

It varies by type of plant and sometimes between seed sellers. It could mean from when you sow your seeds or when you transplant. Burpee is one of the seeds merchants that is pretty clear about what they mean and in general appears to follow the following pattern: When seeds are primarily directly sown in your garden the maturity date is from the time your ...


9

Yes, this will affect the seeds' viability but depending on your climate, it may not be enough to worry you. In general, lettuce seeds last about 2-5 years. If your climate is hot and humid, the shorter end of that period will apply. If it is cool and dry, they might last longer. If you are in a hot, humid climate and want to extend their life, you can ...


8

Spring and fall are excellent times to over seed with new grass seed. You can improve the success by top dressing with 1/4" to 1/2" of compost or good weed free soil. by top dressing you hide the seeds from hungry birds and keep it moister to improve germination less watering is required in spring and fall as the temperatures are cooler That being said, ...


8

It depends on (1) the type of plant and (2) the storage conditions. Different plants have seeds that last for different lengths of time. Onion seeds, for example, should be purchased fresh every year since the seeds are very perishable. Tomato seeds can last 4 years with decent storage practices. (Possibly longer if you do everything exactly right.) Seeds ...


8

I've been gardening for years and do a mix. For veggies that I can direct seed in the garden or start in seed trays outside - greens, peas, beans, radishes, squash, cucumbers, carrots, fall cabbage and broccoli, okra, etc. - I use seeds. They are much cheaper, and there is plenty of time to grow them from seed entirely out doors in my climate. For ...


8

I planted Palestine Strawberry clover in my yard (Phoenix, AZ) this past fall. My clover seems extraordinarily resilient so far (with the exception of falling prey to our local quail population). Considering clover is considered a difficult-to-remove lawn pest by many, I don't expect you'll have too much trouble getting them established. When I sowed mine, ...


8

Probably the easiest and most self-sustaining plants to grow are the invasive ones, although you have to be careful, because they are invasive. You may or may not have neighbors that care about this, and there may or may not be laws you’ll need to consider for certain kinds of plants. You might consider growing the following (not all of which are invasive): ...


8

The seed coat is hydrating. Perfectly normal, just not usually seen when germinating in soil. having played with "germinate on a wet paper towel and carefully plant with toothpick" method, I've seen it. Here's a lovely poster (pdf) (of the science conference type) by Dongfang Zhou, Monica Ponder, Jacob Barney and Greg Welbaum of Virginia Tech - far more ...


8

Found it! There's a great site for identifying seeds. And my flower is: Cosmos bipinnatus!


8

What you have there is referred to as a tassel-ear. You are correct that corn is a monecious flower, but the way it develops is a little different. When the flower (both tassel and ear) first form they are perfect flowers (both male and female). During normal development different hormones are sent to the tassel and the ear, causing the tassel-flower to ...


8

What I have done is open up the peppers and then clean and dry the seeds out. I subsequently store the seeds and plant them at the appropriate time in the season. In my case I plant them indoors in early January on a heat mat and subsequently transfer them outside. This will give you a head start to the season. I plant them in a seeding mix. Generally, ...


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