7

Yes, the colour will block some light, but not too much. The only reason they sell these green plastic coverings on a frame is because they're thought to be more aesthetically pleasing than looking at clear plastic, and because the material they're made from is somewhat tougher than clear plastic.


6

It depends on your environment and how much light is blocked. Basically opaque plastic might even let 70-90% of light true even though you can't see through it. This depends highly on the plastic. If you're in lowlight environment then that would be bad but if you're in environment where you have enough or too much light then this should not cause problems. ...


6

Plants grown warm, indoors, will need hardening off to transition to an outdoor greenhouse that's unheated. One aspect you may not have considered with a "simple greenhouse" is cooking the plants on a bright, sunny day - an unventilated greenhouse can become a solar oven. There are unpowered wax-based automatic vents, or else you need a person on the job ...


6

Adding to @Ecnerwal excellent answer - Draped row covers will provide a little additional support by trapping in more heat - maybe 1-3 degrees c - the key would be to take them off during the day to help heat the soil beneath them. If you look at what hardiness zones plants can be grown in and when you can plant them, that should give you an indication as ...


6

Will the pepper grow back? Not exactly. However, after you harvest the pepper the plant likely will produce more flowers, which can be pollinated and grow into more peppers.


6

You could do this, and it could indeed strengthen the remaining fruits - another option may be to encourage the plant to grow back downwards.


5

Several of the answers here are incorrect. Green plastic absorbs green light or reflects it which is why it appears green. Green is chosen because if you want to reduce the light intensity to the inside of the greenhouse, you use green because it's not used by the plants to any significant degree. The filtering is not perfect which is why you might still ...


5

I received an answer from an OGrow representative. OGrow is a manufacturer of greenhouses. Me: Can we get an official response on how to choose between the green and clear coverings? I'm mainly going to grow fruit trees and shrubs. Would fruit trees do better with the clear covering because bit provides full sun? OGrow: While we cannot ...


5

White up reflects more light to the plants, and keeps the soil cooler (from sun) probably also keeps fuel-based heat in the soil better if the ground was what was being heated in the commercial hothouses. If the air was being heated, makes little difference. Black up warms the soil more effectively from sun. Either should block most weed growth under them. ...


5

If the plants apparently have never (or not for a while) been exposed to strong sun and wind, I would definitively recommend hardening them off or shielding them a bit: If the plants look basically robust, e.g. if you suspect they have been bought by the nursery from another supplier that grew them outside, leaving them outside in dappled shade and with ...


5

It depends somewhat on "WHAT" the inside/outside properties are. If they include an "anti-drip" or AD coating, that should be on the inside, and you might be able to see that water beads up less and runs off more easily on that side of the plastic if you spray a bit on from a plant mister. The main problem (AIUII) with having it inside out is that the UV ...


5

Growing plants in different climate zones can be a challenge. For people in warm climates. The first thing you need to do is make a plan. And research the climate your plant grows in likes. At our greenhouse, we use an aquarium and pump ice water through a trough that allows the plants we are growing to have the correct root temperatures.


5

The two plants on the left are either Carnegiea gigantea or Saguaro or Pachycereus pringlei or Mexican/Sonoran Saguaro. They look very similar at this stage. They look to be 10-15 years old. My mother bought a P. pringlei this size 7 years ago and it is now over 8 feet tall and flowered this past spring. They grow arms more quickly than Saguaros. Saguaros ...


5

With greenhouse plastic there are some issues to keep in mind. First, if you are considering a longer term installation then UV light will quickly shatter regular plastic. UV resistant plastics are available. Even then your max lifetime is about 4 years. The second issue is abrasion. With expansion and contraction of the plastic sheet the plastic cover is ...


4

While looking for an answer to this question myself, I came across this article which talks about actual studies that have been done regarding the colour of plastic greenhouse covers. In particular it states: In studies, it has been found that using green plastic to cover a greenhouse results in plants which are slightly (but very slightly) shorter than ...


4

Green filters, such as the green colored plastic, allows more green light than other wavelengths to pass through. For plants, the blue and red part of the spectrum are the most important. Since plant leaves are generally green, they reflect green light. I don't think the green color would be the best choice to grow plants under. I'm pretty sure a green ...


4

Green filters, such as the green colored plastic, allows more green light than other wavelengths to pass through. For plants, the blue and red part of the spectrum are the most important. Since plant leaves are generally green, they reflect green light. I don't think the green color would be the best choice to grow plants under. Red would probably be better....


4

Your plants need the UV light, so blocking 99% of it will be too much. You should stay at around 50-60%.


4

If you're googling how to grow microgreens in a greenhouse, you will likely get a lot of sales and information of the type you're complaining about, or information aimed at large professional growers. The other problem you might have is that any 'controlled conditions' mentioned as suitable for this type of crop may not be the same conditions created for ...


4

Each pane of glass will reduce the number of lumens coming in which means less light for your plants, which as close to the arctic circle as you will be will starve your plants for light during the winter months. I would opt for double glazing, take the savings from that and invest in a high quality wood stove that will allow you to keep the glass house ...


4

I would take expert advice from a boiler person/heating installer, frankly - the steam condensate produced by these boilers contains nitrites.which are produced by the gas burning process. The pipe carrying the steam outdoors (I assume you had yours fitted more than 2 years ago) is prone to freezing in very cold weather, and if the condensate flows over a ...


4

Even if you cannot heat your greenhouse, there is a lot you can do to prevent freezing. On the other hand, though, there is a point after which effort is useless without a heat source. If it is just "pop" freezes, as you call them, and not generally not going below for more than a couple hours, there are several ideas you might like to try: Frost Patrol® ...


4

My partner's parents live in Townsville which has a dry tropical climate, and they use a greenhouse for their orchids (specifically to keep the humidity up, but also to prevent direct sunlight exposure). It's in full sun but only from above (sides are not exposed as it's between two houses) for most of the day (southern side of the house). The material is ...


4

more light = more growth, although I'd imagine if you are growing this for personal edification rather then produce yield, this will be much less of a factor. If I understand the Light value of 62 to mean 62%, this figure does seem very to me to be very much on the low side - I'd have expected figures > 80%. I suspect you are aware that light has ...


4

First of all, I want to caution you regarding the amount of humidity a grow room is going to produce, especially if it's heated. Depending on what your walls are made out of, the humidity may eventually damage them or encourage mold on them. So, make sure that's accounted for. I've had a problem similar to that before, but you probably have more light in the ...


4

As a resource you can consider Eliot Coleman's The Winter Harvest Handbook: Year Round Vegetable Production Using Deep-Organic Techniques and Unheated Greenhouses which discusses growing in unheated greenhouses, and the use of floating row covers to provide extra protection against sub zero temperatures. This was a method pioneered by Prof Emmert in the ...


4

Principle is basically the same; gradual acclimation to different conditions. In your case the different conditions are the greenhouse, not "outside" (or at least not yet) but otherwise the process is similar - move the plants into the greenhouse for a short period, possibly with some artificial shade at first, or taking advantage of a time when the ...


4

Turn off the heat, open all the vents - add more vents if that's not enough, or just grow the lettuce outside, if you like outside grown lettuce better, or want other crops/plants that are not as hardy as lettuce to stay happy in the greenhouse.


4

@Ecnerwal answer is correct, the book "The Winter Harvest" by Eliot Coleman [speaking of some vegetables including Lettuce] states "No only do many of them tolerate cold conditions and even temperatures well below freezing (as long as they are spared the desiccating effects of cold winter winds) they actually thrive and are sweeter, tenderer and more ...


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