9

You can also prune when it freezes, without problems. I do that regularly under snow and have never had a problem. It is also done regularly in my region. Just: don't prune too much early: wait a few weeks until after the last leaves fall, in order to let the starch to reach the roots. if your region could have a strong freeze (less than -15° C, 5° F), ...


8

The cost effective solution for quite some time is and has been and probably will be to move further "towards the equator" and ship "away from the equator", or for a few things that don't ship well and have adequate profit margin grow in a greenhouse, not a basement, sometimes with supplemental lighting. Basement growing tends to be concentrated on high-...


8

There is very little good information about the actual wavelength spectra and intensity for household LED bulbs and they may differ by model/brand and color temperature (ie. 3000K vs 5000K) to some degree. But if they are white (soft or bright) they do emit in RGB - Red Green and Blue. If it was too slanted toward blue (or another color) you would find ...


7

Yes, the colour will block some light, but not too much. The only reason they sell these green plastic coverings on a frame is because they're thought to be more aesthetically pleasing than looking at clear plastic, and because the material they're made from is somewhat tougher than clear plastic.


6

You can certainly try - seed won't cost much. Without more active/brighter/closer/longer lighting, it will probably be rather spindly and weak basil, but providing adequate plant light electrically can run to significant money, at which point buying imported basil might make more sense in wintertime. As a halfway point, you might see if you can (without ...


6

If you're worried about freezing, keep them warm somehow (heat mat/cold frame/both). If you want to boost photosynthesis use lights (not UV, but red and blue). So the first thing is to decide what you'd like to achieve. Attempting to warm the plants using lights is unlikely to work unless you use incandescent lights all night in a greenhouse -- they don't ...


6

Minnesota can have a 20 degree temperature range in the winter, depending on where you live; here's the map. I'm assuming that you're in or near Minneapolis (Zone 4a), where it might hit -30 F in winter. I've lived in Zone 4b (gardening in nearly 100% clay, too), and I could grow pretty much anything that anyone else north of St. Louis can grow - I just had ...


6

Pruning during winter is just fine. Make sure you use alcohol to clean your bypass pruners (avoid anvil types) before, in between different vines and after you have finished. pruning grapevines


5

Several of the answers here are incorrect. Green plastic absorbs green light or reflects it which is why it appears green. Green is chosen because if you want to reduce the light intensity to the inside of the greenhouse, you use green because it's not used by the plants to any significant degree. The filtering is not perfect which is why you might still ...


5

I received an answer from an OGrow representative. OGrow is a manufacturer of greenhouses. Me: Can we get an official response on how to choose between the green and clear coverings? I'm mainly going to grow fruit trees and shrubs. Would fruit trees do better with the clear covering because bit provides full sun? OGrow: While we cannot ...


5

Plants, like us, need a specific amount of daylight and nightlight, rest and adjustment to seasons. You will be putting a strain with the extra light on your plants, in addition to their attempts to survive and adjust to the winter. You are better off building a green house for them, and put the panels to good use to regulate the temperature inside. Or use ...


5

As you're in East Anglia, UK, the plant growing at the base of your banana is Fatsia japonica rather than anything more exotic. This is quite the strangest planting combination I've seen - banana likes plenty of sun, whereas Fatsia does rather better in shadier, cooler conditions, but given the Fatsia's presence there, the fact that it is evergreen means it ...


5

Leave it as is until sod is available in the spring. Just don't walk in that area during winter, to avoid soil compacting. In spring, some minor work will be needed to prepare the area for sod, but new grass or weed will not appear by then, for all intents and purposes.


5

The first things you should do are these: For long-lived and/or expensive perennials, in cold areas, I personally recommend looking for plants that can survive hardiness zones that match the record low temperatures for your area. Hardiness zones are based off of average coldest temperatures in an area, however, which explains why they might call an area ...


5

I once volunteered at a greenhouse that tried to provide fresh tomatoes to local restaurants throughout the winter. We were able to keep the tomatoes growing, but they stopped producing after a few months because we couldn't afford to heat the all-glass greenhouse at a suitably warm (75 F) temperature. Because the house got to below 50 F at night, the fruits ...


4

To beat USD 0.109/kWH you'd have to create a very DIY system, possibly including auction lots of seconds (damaged goods) from eBay or a similar source of solar cells from China, and install them yourself. You might check whether there are any incentives available in your area to help offset the cost of an installed solar power system. In my area (...


4

While looking for an answer to this question myself, I came across this article which talks about actual studies that have been done regarding the colour of plastic greenhouse covers. In particular it states: In studies, it has been found that using green plastic to cover a greenhouse results in plants which are slightly (but very slightly) shorter than ...


4

Green filters, such as the green colored plastic, allows more green light than other wavelengths to pass through. For plants, the blue and red part of the spectrum are the most important. Since plant leaves are generally green, they reflect green light. I don't think the green color would be the best choice to grow plants under. I'm pretty sure a green ...


4

Green filters, such as the green colored plastic, allows more green light than other wavelengths to pass through. For plants, the blue and red part of the spectrum are the most important. Since plant leaves are generally green, they reflect green light. I don't think the green color would be the best choice to grow plants under. Red would probably be better....


4

Since your bin is already frozen and 1/2 full, I would suggest a spade or pick to break up the block into manageable sizes that you can then remove from the container and transfer into a paper bag. Wood shavings for caged pets or barn animals, as well as non-colored and/or non-glossy newsprint will also do a fine job of absorption. You must mix it in ...


4

You can grow plants with white LEDs. The bulbs sold at hardware stores are slightly more efficient than 23 watt CFLs, however they are less efficient than T5s or metal halide bulbs. I have tried LED grow light but got better results and longer bulb life with T5s. The new ceramic metal halides are even better. Many makers of expensive LED grow lights (black ...


4

I use led lights for a planted fish tank, and all of the plants have very high light requirements, and it works fine. Mind you- each fixture (I have two of them), costs around 175.00 dollars, but if led's can grow plants in 20 inches of water in an aquarium, I am sure that for regular plants- led's will do fine.


4

Those are the cotyledons, the first set of leaves and this is totally normal. Your plant looks very healthy. How big is this pot? I am having trouble with scale. This has been a bit of work for you to grow a crepe myrtle hasn't it? I'd go get a grow light of some sort for the winter. Check out the 'pot' stores the ones that sell all kinds of wonderful ...


4

That leaf is the oldest leaf and is in the process of dying. Totally normal. Cut it off so that plant can concentrate its energy making its flower!


4

I live in Wisconsin, where we also plant when the temps can get below freezing, and I think that you're right to be concerned - 9 F is awfully cold for your plants—according to this sustainable farming site, it's just below the lowest temperature spring peas can stand without being killed. Assuming that you have a typical garden-sized row or rows of peas, ...


3

It seems like CFLs or fluorescent tubes would be a better option. That's what most people use and they provide the broadband blue-violet and UV light that LEDs can't provide.


3

I have a univent and left it in the garage over the winter and had to replace the cylinder. Something happens to the gel when it freezes


3

I have multiple 28w LED "grow" lights. They work wonderfully well to keep leafy-green and succulent house plants robust in -very- low light situations. Plants used to die in the same locations. However, the purplish color is somewhat annoying. I would much prefer to use a 'normal,' 'cool-white' 60w-equivalent LED.


3

There are other questions to ask. Where are these Green covers coming from and which market were they designed for? Perhaps for example these green plastic greenhouses were made in China. Now since China is relatively close to Australia and has a strong trading relationship with them perhaps it's possible that they were designed for the Australian market. ...


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