18

Let me preface this answer by saying that due to my experience in 2016 contrasted with my 2015 experience, I personally think soil conditions and composition, kinds of light and light levels, and how you water your tomatoes may have a profound affect on heat-tolerance. Since the temperature in your area fluctuates so much between day and night, the rules ...


11

'Hardening off' is the process by which plants which have been somewhere sheltered and warm are toughened up or gradually acclimatized to live happily somewhere less sheltered and less warm. Plants sold at garden centres which are under cover or inside will need hardening off, but those outside in the open won't need hardening. Seedlings you've grown ...


7

In general, wind chill on its own isn't an issue for hardy plants; however, wind chill combined with below freezing temperatures may cause problems in a few hardy plant stems and leaves. Air in winter (in colder regions) is already pretty dry, and that reduces the amount of fluid in soil and in plant stems; if there's a strong wind chill added on top, then ...


7

I think you are looking the problem from a wrong point of view. Thermal insulator is not a good term and also not good way to have warmer soil. First fact: the soil temperature. The surface temperature have huge variation of temperature (much higher that we imagine, usually we measure air temperature at 1 to 2 meters from soil). Going down in the soil, the ...


6

Will the pepper grow back? Not exactly. However, after you harvest the pepper the plant likely will produce more flowers, which can be pollinated and grow into more peppers.


5

Basically plants from a nursery are "soft" i.e. they have been grown in very controlled, specific, routine conditions, and monitored regularly. When they are then taken out to site and planted, they are exposed to conditions that are completely foreign, be it aspect, exposure, moisture and soil composition etc. The 'Hardening Off' term applies to the period ...


5

No, it will not grow back. The pepper is the result of a pollinated flower, as is a peach, an apple, a tomato, etc. However, save some of the seeds inside the pepper and you can plant them to have a new plant that will flower and will produce more bell peppers once they are pollinated by your local flying insect helper (e.g., a bee). Since you have a ...


5

Lawns should be watered between the hours of 2am and 9am (or thereabouts). Evaporative loss is a concern for two reasons: it's a waste of water, and when a significant proportion of the water you apply evaporates, your turf isn't receiving as much water as you think it is. But even if you account for this evaporative loss (and you should) and don't care ...


5

By English Lavender, I assume you mean Lavandula augustifolia - it does well in Mediterranean countries, not sure if it has an upper heat tolerance, but will certainly thrive in temperatures up to 45 °C and likely higher. French lavender does well Zones 8-11, and the upper temperature in Zone 11 is around 50 °C. What Lavender doesn't like is heavy, ...


5

Cold is a possibility, but I don't think that's what's caused this damage; given where you are, unless you've had freak weather conditions in your particular location, it seems the temperatures recently have not fallen below 20 deg C during the day. What has caused it is direct sunlight. These plants do not like direct sunlight even indoors - outside it ...


5

It is difficult to say. Humans feel temperatures differently than a thermometer, but also the plants do not feel temperatures like thermometers. If it is just a very short period, and then suddenly normal temperatures, they survive without problem (I have sometime hail, which is ice). Soil store heat (and release heat), so after a hot period, a short period ...


4

That is cold damage. It was too cold outside for your plant, and the cold damaged the cells (by expansion > rupture). That looks like a peace lily. Here's a good article on cold damage in peace lilies. From that article: a study by members of the University of Florida's Environmental Horticulture department showed that peace lily can be damaged by ...


4

Prick them out into individual cells, then, when they're big enough, move into pots. Once they've grown to a good size, with a good root system, then you can plant them out- but even then, they will need plenty of water to establish themselves. Depending on what you're growing, some seeds can be sown or scattered on the ground directly in spring, where they ...


4

Avocados are a subtropical species that like high humidity and a climate without even mild frost. They prefer deep, well drained soil that has a pH around 6.2 (slightly acidic). Since they don't like any temperature below freezing, growing them indoors is probably best during winter in your zone. Once you are sure no freezing will occur you can move them ...


4

Timing's important, it's not clear how long ago the sod was put down, but as your weather is now turning wintry, it would not be a great idea to water it. In any case, if the landscaping company actually did water it for two weeks after laying, if that was, say, only a month ago, then hopefully it shouldn't be a problem. If they laid it a longer time ago, ...


4

To follow on from what Mr. Catenazzi wrote, during the winter in cold areas you WANT to keep the soil frozen so that it doesn't heave during periodic thaws. This can involve waiting until the soil freezes "hard" and then placing mulch over it - often, cut up Christmas trees. This is especially important if you planted perennials late in the season, as frost ...


4

It depends on which plants and which part of their cycle you are trying to emulate. Tomatoes as a tropical perennial will always benefit from 12 or more hours of direct sunlight every day. However many herbs needs dormancy, such as parsley in order to go to seed in their second year. You may not want seed however and will remove the parsley after its ...


4

Many days this past summer were over 40 °C (103 °F) here in subtropical Queensland (Australia). Tomatoes, capsicums/peppers, eggplants and cucumber were all really productive under shade cloth, provided they're kept well watered. It's too hot for lettuces and most other greens, however beetroot and turnip greens grow exceptionally well in the heat even ...


4

Probably the main reason you found no temperature recommendation is because currant cuttings are often propagated outdoors: In late fall, cuttings (from the current year) are placed deep into garden soil. They stay outside all winter, protected by a layer of leaf mulch or similar. Propagating in pots is of course possible, but I would not put them in a warm ...


4

There are a few conditions to consider with temperature and fruiting plants. Below a certain temperature, fruit will not set on a flower. For eggplants this threshold seems to be night temperatures below 50 degrees Fahrenheit. However, the plant can still live, new flowers will form, and those new flowers can produce fruit. Below a further temperature, the ...


3

I don't think it's the actual temperature in and of itself that you need to be worried about, as to whether or not plants can survive in it. For instance, in some areas, people go on about how nothing lives through the summer once it gets beyond temperature x. In other areas, it's considered the peak of the growing season when it's temperature x, and the ...


3

I'm sure you worked it out, but yes, if the stems were alive, and the fruits were not damaged, the vines should leaf out again, and the fruit ripen. Thinning the fruit some, and cutting back the vine ends can make this less of a burden on the root system (enabling a faster flush). And yes, some frost tender veggies are more frost tender than others. If the ...


3

That is quite hot, but in my experience they can handle a few hot days (with adequate water). Proper Nighttime temp is critical for fruit set - if nights are too hot they just won't set fruit and flowers will drop. This article has good details http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/m/#publication?id=HS1195 The article specifies that Tomato flowers must be ...


3

Watering in the day is actually good for the plant because it reduces the chance of it getting mold/disease. However due to higher evaporation rate in the sunlight/day it is best to o it at night when the humidity/temp/light is lower to reduce your water use and also to let the water soak to a deeper level that just the top 1 inch.


3

Congratulations on the purchase of your house! Lawn care can be one of the most complicated things for new homeowners and there is definitely a right and wrong way to water your lawn. Things like seasons, how much water to use and how often to water your lawn all play a big part in the health of your lawn. We have an article on watering lawns that has ...


3

Fukien Tea is a tropical plant and is one of the few species that can be successfully grown indoor as a bonsai. However, keep in mind indoor bonsai is much more difficult than growing outdoor bonsai. I do bonsai for many years now (mostly outdoor species), and have tried some indoor trees as well. I never tried Fukien Tea, but have tried Podocarpus and ...


3

I would do nothing. Cyclamens should resist to freeze. Maybe you could keep near the wall, but I would not bring them inside: too much shock. The cold storm should end soon, so the plant will "defrozen" slowly. Now you cannot do much. Next year, try to cover them with some tissues. Wait 2 3 weeks, and let see if you plant is still alive. I think so, leaves ...


3

Depending on the species/cultivar of cyclamen, it may or may not be resistant to freezing temperatures. What you can do: Place it in a sheltered spot where it won’t freeze/thaw too quickly, and wit for new growth (once it thaws, you can check the bulb.. if it’s mushy, you can discard it) Don’t bring a frozen plant indoors and thaw to room temperature ...


3

No, it does not mean when the ground is frozen; it means before your last frost date. Frost and frozen ground are not quite the same thing. This answer here, though it's actually about when to cut grass, has information regarding the difference and may be of relevance How long after last frost before lawns need mowing?. Usually, two weeks before your last ...


3

No, it doesn't. If the ground is frozen, you're a long way until the last frost. Frost is an icy substance that forms on the ground, plants, car windshields, and things. It tends to form in the early morning. Since weather people take the temperature higher up, it can be freezing lower down, and frost even at 41° F. (which I have witnessed), although in my ...


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