8

If you are going for a low-maintenance garden that will not require humans to be there to care for them, I think your best bet is to go with a native plant garden. It will need care while you are establishing it, but once the plants have developed a strong root system, they will require almost no care. Have you seen the Project Noah? There is a page on ...


6

They really are remarkably hardy, though that can also be enhanced somewhat if you toss some row cover over them, or straw (leaves also work and may be easier to lay your hands on a supply of) around the leeks. It also helps (with the non-leeks, at least) to harvest when the air temperature is above freezing (even if they have been frozen) at least according ...


6

Adding to @Ecnerwal excellent answer - Draped row covers will provide a little additional support by trapping in more heat - maybe 1-3 degrees c - the key would be to take them off during the day to help heat the soil beneath them. If you look at what hardiness zones plants can be grown in and when you can plant them, that should give you an indication as ...


6

Plants grown warm, indoors, will need hardening off to transition to an outdoor greenhouse that's unheated. One aspect you may not have considered with a "simple greenhouse" is cooking the plants on a bright, sunny day - an unventilated greenhouse can become a solar oven. There are unpowered wax-based automatic vents, or else you need a person on the job ...


5

Assuming, we stick with Lilium medeoloides as the species in question, yes it is "readily grown" according to one supplier and suppliers do exist (in the UK at least). The difficulty I could see is that like many bulbs, it takes a lot longer to develop bulbs than cultivated bulbs such as Allium cepa. This would make unsuitable for cultivation within an ...


5

Depends... Standard leeks are very hardy. But there are 'summer leeks' which are not so much. I think if you had those you'd already be seeing a loss in quality. If you know the variety look them up. Mulching them up will help them keep quality and blanch them a bit too - and there should be loads of leave to do this with now. Kale is similar. There are ...


5

Pineapples commercially induced to bloom and fruit by spraying with a dilute solution to 2,4-D, among others, such as various growth hormones, and ethylene gas. (Mentioned by my botany professor -- 40 years ago, as an illustration that toxicity is in the dose) Survey of induced flowering in pineapple in brazil Raft of references in the article. Paper in ...


5

Growing plants in different climate zones can be a challenge. For people in warm climates. The first thing you need to do is make a plan. And research the climate your plant grows in likes. At our greenhouse, we use an aquarium and pump ice water through a trough that allows the plants we are growing to have the correct root temperatures.


5

They should be fine as long as it doesn't actually freeze. I grow them in Montana and they are very susceptible to frost, but only if it actually frosts. If the peppers are touched by frost, they get soft and mushy.


4

If you're going to prune in the cold, then damp is good (it prevents drying). Go ahead and prune the lavender. It won't be harmed by it at all, this time of year.


4

As a resource you can consider Eliot Coleman's The Winter Harvest Handbook: Year Round Vegetable Production Using Deep-Organic Techniques and Unheated Greenhouses which discusses growing in unheated greenhouses, and the use of floating row covers to provide extra protection against sub zero temperatures. This was a method pioneered by Prof Emmert in the ...


4

Gardeners are very utilitarian people. We like to see a good return for the effort expended, and we look after our needs before our wants. The staples such as beans and potatoes and corn produce well for moderate effort. Other crops such as asparagus and Jerusalem artichoke produce special benefits but require more effort in comparison to the benefit gained, ...


4

Should be fine where you are, provided you don't plant it somewhere that dries out frequently. It likes reasonably moist, well drained soil, and tends to flower better in sun than shade. Flowering is variable between October and December - some years you might find it flowers just before leaf fall, and other years, after all the leaves have gone. The ...


4

I live in Wisconsin, where we also plant when the temps can get below freezing, and I think that you're right to be concerned - 9 F is awfully cold for your plants—according to this sustainable farming site, it's just below the lowest temperature spring peas can stand without being killed. Assuming that you have a typical garden-sized row or rows of peas, ...


3

Grass is not normally sensitive to frost and is not burned by the sun due to frost crystals. That is because when temperatures are low the plant goes dormant. More information is found here where the only issue seems to be a sensitivity to herbicides. This turf supplier in Australia notes that is cold tolerant down to -10 Deg C in Canberra. As long as ...


3

I have gardened for years,too many to count. The most success I have had has been to keep the greenhouse area above 10 celcius at night, water your plants so they do not take up all the moisture when sweating. That's what causes them to freeze.keep them off the ground as it is colder there.I run a fan during the day so they get used to a breeze and makes ...


3

I agree that Kamchatka lily is Fritillaria camschatcensis - assuming that's the plant you mean, it requires acid, humus rich soil that is well drained but never dries out, and relatively shady conditions. These are not conditions which most vegetables appreciate, so its not a likely candidate for inclusion in the average vegetable plot.


3

There is 28 pages of guidance with many images at Building the Gothic Modular Moveable Tunnel Designed By Eliot Coleman at Four Season Farm courtesy of Johnny’s Selected Seeds. It is both copyrighted and too long to summarise meaningfully in just a few paragraphs. Skinning there was with Tufflite IV Greenhouse Film.


3

There are concrete grid and grass systems, if it's the plastic you don't like. This page claims that porous asphalt systems stand up to freezing better than normal asphalt, and stand up to salt better than concrete systems. This is a rather more in-depth review of various systems and maintenance issues, with one reult being a suggestion that regular ...


3

You can plant them when it's still frosting out, but not when it's still freezing regularly. Until then, keep them in the coolest, darkest spot you have inside. An unheated basement or garage is perfect. A large shed should work too, if not too drafty. If it's too warm, they will put out shoots and start growing, which isn't fatal, but can cause severe ...


3

Just looking at weatherunderground for your location, it shows the temps for your city dipping down into the mid 30's early this January, and even colder temps last January. It may not happen often that the temps drop that low, but the hardiness zone is accounting for the worst case scenario. That said, hardiness zones really only tell you about your ...


3

The Dawn Redwood (Metasequoia glyptostroboides) has buttress roots, and can survive in USDA zones 4-8. (image source) (image source)


2

As long as the ground isn't frozen, herbaceous plants that are solidly hardy in your area can still be transplanted. Plant at the normal (proper) depth, and mulch if you can. I like to do it after the tops start dying off, but before I cut them. It kind of gives them a 'handle' and I don't have to worry about hurting them, because they're coming off soon. ...


2

Warning: Some of these solutions may actually be or become problems, due to the invasive nature of most of my suggestions. I'm just assuming you might prefer some of them to garlic mustard. Use my suggestions judiciously. Clover might work reasonably well. Creeping Charlie would probably work great. It is a weed and hard to get rid of, but it's perennial, ...


2

USDA zones are reviewed from time to time, but the fact you're zoned as 9b should mean that, historically (I don't know how far back you went) it was possible for temperatures to drop that low. The point of zoning is knowing what the temperature you're likely to encounter in any given area will be, in particular, the coldest. There is, though, a problem with ...


2

It's Trachelospermum jasminoides, an evergreen twining climber. Unfortunately, its only hardy down to -10 degC as a minimum temperature, so if your winter temperatures regularly fall lower than this, its not a good choice. https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/18287/Trachelospermum-jasminoides/Details


2

Throughout Northern Europe, Scandinavia and Great Britain the go-to paving solution for drastic weather variations is a combination of porphyry and a mortar called GftK. Porphyry (ancient greco-roman for "purple") is a tough and beautiful, naturally occurring cousin of granite. If you have been to Europe or South America and have seen the cobbled streets, ...


2

As general way to get an answer (but not really an answer). Botanical gardens or some good public gardens can give you a lot of ideas. Usually they have also some flowers for winter, and usually also a some local flowers, so you can check and see what are the most beautiful ones, which can grow in your garden. Additionally, you can ask the gardeners for ...


2

I don't know what frost is like in Australia, sadly...but here it is a big deal for lawn grasses. The deal is to NOT WALK ON YOUR FROSTED LAWN. This breaks the blades and crowns and if your grass is frozen enough will kill the grass you walk upon. You'll actually be able to see your footprints in the spring. Just stay off your grass when the lawn is ...


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