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17

Yes, you should thin them. If you wanted to keep them, you could try pricking out -- gently tease apart the roots from the soil and move the plant into a separate container. Always handle the plant by the leaves, not the stem. (The plant can replace a broken leaf, but a broken stem is fatal.) In your case, since you've got more plants than you need, thin ...


16

Tray watering is the standard way of watering plants so that the soil surface is not damaged. The water is poured in at the bottom - so no damage, and then soaks up through the soil. The seedlings will need to be in a shallow tray for this to work (it won't work with a deep pot unless the plants have a good root structure). For my pepper seedlings, use the ...


16

When you are dealing with plants which are going to end up in containers anyway you absolutely could opt to seed them into those containers indoors and then later move the containers outside once you've hardened off the plants. They might turn out just fine that way and I'd absolutely encourage you to try that - seeing what works is part of the fun of ...


11

@winwaed's answer is definitely the right way to do it for conventionally grown seedlings. But you can sidestep this entire issue (how to best water tender seedlings) by using soil blocks. These are a compressed soil mixture that holds a surprising amount of water. I like to start small seeds in 3/4" blocks, larger seeds in 2" blocks. (When the seedlings in ...


11

Depends how big they are - if the ground is damp and they're no taller than, say, 6-10 inches, you should be able to pull them up. If the ground isn't damp, make sure it is when you attempt this. If they've been there longer (since last year or more) then you need to dig them out and repair the grass afterwards. If they've been there much longer and are ...


11

Looks like pumpkin, Vivid. You don't remember what you sowed?


10

You should definitely thin them out. No more than two per spot. If you have two, you will have to make sure they get enough nutrients and water. I snip the stem of the thinnest stalked seedlings with a pair of scissors. If they are the same height I pick the one with more leaves. It does look like your seedlings could use a little more light, but they will ...


10

My experience is different. It is very easy to have a apple tree from seed. But apple trees are not auto-fertile. This mean that to have apple on a tree, you need pollen from an other trees (and other varieties). There are tables about which varieties could pollinate which other variety, so different variety is not always enough. To complicate things, you ...


10

That looks like fine root hairs on the hypocotyl of a normal , healthy seedling still in the cotyledon stage. These root hairs greatly increase the surface area of the root and are thought to aid in nutrient absorption, anchorage and microbial interactions. Edit: It does look like the root has pushed the seedling out of the medium though (maybe they are ...


9

There are a few common issues with citrus grown indoors. I have seen them get 5 or 6 feet tall indoors, we are talking a plant that wants to be a tree! If it gets enough light indoors normally the environment is dry enough to encourage spider mites. Seeing your citrus webbed by mites is not a pleasant sight. Higher humidity discourages mites. Soap and ...


9

Here's what I do over the course of a week before I transplant to the garden. This is sort of the "ideal" plan, it never goes exactly this way -- variations are ok. On the first day, which is ideally overcast and not windy, set the plants outside for a couple of hours. If it is sunny, I put them out in a spot where they'll be shaded for those two hours. If ...


9

I'd say the stress of replanting is causing this non-growth. Small damages to roots and new type of soil. The seedlings need to recover. I'd be patient.


9

They look far too thin and spindly, which probably means they are not getting enough light. If they are indoors, they are probably also too warm in a heated house, and watering "every day" seems much too frequent. Remember these things are TREES. They can germinate and survive out of doors, in whatever conditions the climate throws at them. They don't ...


9

You don't need any fertiliser at all to start with - the clue is in the word 'starter'. You're only meant to germinate the seeds, then wait till they have 2/3 sets of leaves (one cotyledon pair and one true leaves), at which point you move them into individual pots containing probably seed and cutting compost - then move them up into potting compost in ...


9

I'm by no means an expert, however I am pretty sure that, at least for Zucchini, Cucumber and peppers 1% more light = 1% more growth. Thus in order to increase growth, maybe you should start moving these into full sun.


9

I planted some Oxalis deppei in the garden at my university last year and it looked just like your plant. It had little dark pink flowers and spread like crazy, from 15 bulbs planted in spring I got at least 50 bulbs in autumn, including smaller ones. This was on a rocky small area that somewhat contained them.


8

I had no problem with them disintegrating, probably because I packed them tightly in a seed tray. However I found that fungus grew and spread quickly through the pots. I prefer giving the seedlings plenty of time before transplanting - if I planted on as soon as they sprouted it might be a different story.


8

There is lots of info online concerning growing citrus indoors. I know grapefruit trees get pretty big and so may be a challenge to keep indoors after a few years but you're not at a point to worry about this yet. There are the basics to make sure are in place: keep your trees watered but make sure the pots have good drainage and offer room for the roots ...


8

Try removing the bag a little at a time over the period of several days so the seedling can acclimate to the unprotected environment. It's going to be just like hardening off any plant.


8

All plants should have pots matching the plant size, otherwise you risk root-bound plants or trouble with watering. That's why we re-pot as needed and only go up a few pot sizes at a time. Roses like to go deep with their roots, so I would aim for a pot of ca. 5 cm / 2 inches height right now, once the seedling is established, take it from there. ...


8

The sunchoke, also frequently called Jerusalem artichoke, is a species called H. Tuberosus, in the Helianthus genus of Asteraceae, which is a large plant family that includes sunflowers and daisies. Even though it grows from a tuber root rather than a seed, the plant when it emerges looks very much like any other flower in that group. The Ohio Perennial ...


8

Think of how tomatoes grow "in the wild" fruit drops to the ground, slowly rots, and when conditions are right a new plant emerges. So cut open the fruit and cover it in soil, the results are not surprising. I don't see why this method wouldn't work for people who just want a "tomato". The types of people that will save seeds from store bought tomatoes and ...


8

It happens occasionally - not uncommon in chilli pepper, tomatoes and cannabis plants. It doesn't seem to confer any advantage and usually, the seedling continues to grow normally, with two true leaves when they appear, although occasionally, three true leaves appear and you get a more branched plant, albeit usually slower growing and not so tall. Just one ...


7

Plant it now in a pot with a height and diameter of four to six inches. Avocados are trees so in good conditions you can expect that it will need to be re potted one size larger in a year or two. Avocados exhibit apical dominance so when I have cut mine back they do not sprout multiple leaders but just sit there until one new bud one the side forms. I do ...


7

It will help to find what variety you have, as some varieties need much wider spacing than others. Here is an idea of what you are looking for via spacing: 2-3' tall matured: Space 10-14" apart 3-4' tall matured: Space 12-18" apart 4-6' tall matured: Space 14-24" apart 6-8' tall matured: Space 16-30" apart 8-12' tall matured: Space 20-36" apart 12'-up: ...


7

I take a bit of a different approach than J. Musser does (and here I am making an assumption based on the answer), but I agree with that approach when adding commercial fertilizer. Bagged fertilizer (e.g., 10-10-10) can be quite hard on young seedlings. J. Musser didn't specifically state the use of commercial fertilizer in that answer, but I believe that ...


7

Put the seed in a pot (if you want it potted) and put the pot in the ground; or plant directly in the ground. Wait for spring. The seeds require "cold treatment" - they are programmed not to sprout until they have experienced "winter" since seeds that sprout in fall lead to dead seedlings. The above method is the simple way to get that. If you like, you can ...


7

The trouble with introducing 'life' by inoculating with garden soil is you have no control over which life forms you are introducing, and some of them might be pathogenic when contained inside a pot or grow bag. That is why there are commercially produced potting composts, to avoid that risk. Some people actually grow plants in soil they've dug from the ...


7

Do they prefer it? No, not really. Plants have evolved to grow and orient themselves to get the most light in any given conditions. It could even be argued that turning them away from this orientation reduces their overall light exposure to some degree (while they re-orient again), but the overall effect is likely negligible. But there is another reason to ...


6

If the leaves/cotyledons are lying on the soil I would attempt to do something about this, so they would not rot. If it is only a part of the stem – don't bother. The seedling will continue growing up. When transplanting just plant it deeper, to put the bending point underground. It will become a part of the root system – not even hurting the appearance of ...


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