12

The aloe is not growing in that medium. Sugar dissolves, rice and coffee decompose, when exposed to the conditions required for a healthy root zone. They would sour and kill the plant roots. Not suitable at all for growing plants in. It's either temporary, or someone doesn't know what they're doing, or the plant is in an inside pot. What you could do, if ...


11

I'm revising my answer again, but this time with an opinion based on my observations of peppers (not bell types specifically): My opinion is that they'll continue to live as long as they're healthy and pruned. If they're in a small container and not pruned, they might die after they produce ripe fruit the first or second time, but if you prune them ...


9

Rotating some plants while in bud may cause flower stem weakening and bud drop, as in Schlumbergeras. but generally, if the light source tends to be one sided, it is a good idea to rotate the pot. You can do this at any time, but if you use a schedule, you get the most balanced growth. I've even made my own rotators for my small windowsill plants, equipped ...


8

The general rule is that if the plants are hardy two zones colder than where you live, they'll be fine outside in pots. So for you that would mean they'll be fine if the plants are hardy to zone 4. If they are not hardy down to zone 4 or you just want a little extra insurance there are still a few things you could try: Clustering the pots and then ...


8

For what it's worth we have a local greenhouse that grows bell peppers and tomatoes year round. They use plants for 2 years. I think they trash them after that because the amount of woody stems starts to get out of hand. Since an individual grower isn't as concerned about production per square foot, you can probably extend this by at least another year. ...


8

Probably the easiest and most self-sustaining plants to grow are the invasive ones, although you have to be careful, because they are invasive. You may or may not have neighbors that care about this, and there may or may not be laws you’ll need to consider for certain kinds of plants. You might consider growing the following (not all of which are invasive): ...


8

This plant is an aloe. It's a desert dwelling succulent. In warm weather they can handle being watered once a month, sometimes more often in HOT weather. Indoors they can often go several months without water before they complain. If they're watered frequently they start to suffer from drowning and root rot very quickly. The lower leaves of your plant appear ...


8

None of those are particularly "fast" examples. Radish is fast - 3 weeks to harvest for the small types. I don't like it much, but it's fast. You'd need to let some go to seed for seeds. Since your "not actually very fast" examples seem to mostly be things that are usually propagated by clone, potatoes, sweet potatoes/yams, shallots, sunchokes, ...


8

My potato bag is one square foot in diameter, and just under 2 foot high. You have 16 square feet in your bed so you could potentially plant one seed potato ( or part of one with at least 3 eyes ) per square foot. One foot deep is about the minimum you can go. Assuming you have good drainage, and you're using a well fertilized soil, you can plant each ...


8

Topping with compost is always a good idea, it should be an annual fall event, however it won't hurt to do it in the spring when you move in. In any case it's always good to bring some samples from each bed to your agricultural extension office and get a full test done. It will tell you what the soil has and what it should be amended with.


8

This is fairly normal behavior for these plants. As they grow, the stems get longer, and since the leaves are full of water, the weight of the top of the plant pulls the stem over to one side. It's not really indicative of a problem, but it can be a little annoying. You've got a couple of options as I see it: You can get a heavy, possibly ceramic pot ...


7

Yes you can grow onions in containers. You can usually buy onion sets from local stores which will produce a good size onion much faster than starting from seed. Garlic works as well. We are currently growing it in 2 inch diameter pots from a clove bought from the store. With containers, bigger is better subject to some limitations. wet soil is heavy. ...


7

The spinach seedlings are far more fragile; I'd recommend moving the mint. You can do it anytime, but the sooner the better. As you have just planted the mint, it should come out fairly easily. Be as careful as possible, and don't disturb the spinach seedlings. Repot the mint normally in a new container, and refill the hole in the mix for the spinach. I'd ...


7

I take a bit of a different approach than J. Musser does (and here I am making an assumption based on the answer), but I agree with that approach when adding commercial fertilizer. Bagged fertilizer (e.g., 10-10-10) can be quite hard on young seedlings. J. Musser didn't specifically state the use of commercial fertilizer in that answer, but I believe that ...


7

EDIT: Sorry about this, everyone, but a lot of the stuff I said about Kiwano from my personal experience may in fact be wrong, because my Kiwano plants appear to be growing cucumbers. I messaged the person who traded them to me. So, hopefully we'll get this sorted out and find out if it's just a weird Kiwano plant, a rare hybrid, or a full-fledged cucumber. ...


7

Two in a 5 gallon pot is going to be pretty cramped. If they are going to live in the pot their whole lives they will choke each other and you'll potentially get less production than you would from a single plant. Your bamboo setup could be more open at the top but what you have should work, when the plant gets to the top it'll train outside the sticks and ...


7

Looking at the measurements of your garden bed, it sounds like square foot gardening. And yes, potatoes are included in that method, one seed per square, so sixteen for your bed. One issue with potatoes is depth: For a good harvest the emerging sprouts are covered with soil to encourage more root mass and more tubers. In "standard" gardening, this is ...


7

This technique is used by commercial growers for tree and shrub production the pots you use should be identical and readily available in bulk quantities sandy soil is probably not the best if you are growing trees as it will shift in high winds ready access to water. Plant material using this method can dry out faster and a drip or bubbler irrigation system ...


7

The cause is usually not enough light, or the light is very directional (for example if the pot is near a window). The remedy is to turn the pot regularly (i.e. every day or two) to keep the plant growing straight. You can't "straighten out" a plant that has grown as twisted as your picture, though. Best to start again from cuttings, as in the other answer. ...


7

I'm kind of the opposite of stormy. I love gardening directly in the ground (that is my method of choice for most things). The only reason I use raised beds is because we have some. However, I do know some pros and cons. Here are some observations: The soil will get warmer, since sun can shine on the sides of the raised beds, instead of just on the top of ...


7

With regular garlic, you would cut it off at a certain point if you wanted bigger bulbs in the ground, or leave it on if you want bulbils/bulblets to form. FYI: You can eat garlic scapes (they're tasty). Unlike most garlic, leeks produce true seed (so for leeks, you would leave the flower and scape on if you wanted seeds). I've never grown elephant garlic. ...


7

If the plants are outdoors some of the year or all of the year, then earthworms are inevitable, and are not undesirable. If these are plants he wants to keep indoors, then I suggest he decants them, washes off all the soil, and repots into fresh potting soil - and keeps them indoors all the time. There used to be products to clear worms from lawns, though ...


7

Gees, looks like a potato. But one couldn't forget planting a potato, right? Grins...I am being very bad! Potato would be fine planted in this humongous pot. Seeds of other plants, not so much. If you were thinking garlic or ginger...that would be closer. Do you think you planted this potato using seed? Or do you remember cutting potatoes into sections ...


6

Coffee is considered a tropical plant and is not going to overwinter in the Netherlands. It makes a good house plant but there are some obstacles between you and a cup of coffee you grew and processed yourself. a plant capable of fruiting is two to three meters tall it is usually three to five years old before flowering and producing beans the beans can ...


6

You're probably right, the containers are being baked by hot sun, especially standing on hard surfacing like concrete, which holds the heat. Some remedial arrangement of the containers would certainly help; moving them close together, or as close as possible, or grouping them, so that the plants have sufficient room with good air circulation, but are close ...


6

Yes excess NPK can damage plants, although how much N, P, or K is too much depends on the plant. For example, you shouldn't add too much N to the soil for radishes and carrots because that will causes them to grow lots of leaves and small vegetables. Conversely, grass-type plants, like corn, and vegetables you grow for their leaves, like kale and lettuce, ...


6

Garlic. About as fool-proof and reliable about making "seed" as they come. Potatoes. As with garlic, if you can grow the crop, you have your "seed." No fuss about hybrids, cross breeding intentional or not, etc. with the above as it's not an actual seed - you are growing clones. Unlike seed-producing crops, you need to save a significant portion of the ...


6

Yes, they will root if you put them into a very sandy, free-draining mix kept slightly damp at all times, preferably with bottom heat, but if that's not possible, keep it in a warm, bright place. Light is essential, but extremely intense light at this time may dry out the pad. You won't have this issue during winter, as the sun is low in intensity. The ...


6

The most likely explanation is too much sun too quickly - the chlorophyll content in the leaves is greatest on the upper surface, and its the chlorophyll that absorbs sunlight. Your plant, being exposed to sun suddenly, flipped its leaves to absorb less of it - this is not an unusual event on pepper plants and it shouldn't affect its fruiting. Next time you ...


6

Well we're already into July, past the longest day, so it rather depends where you live - if you're somewhere that experiences fall by September, no, don't nip those off. If, on the other hand, you have warm temperatures right up to Christmas, then yes, you could do - but shortening day length also has an impact on plants in terms of growth and flowering. On ...


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