11

That is a ladybug larvae - don't kill it. It is eating pests, and is a beneficial insect. Are the beetles they were found with ladybugs? that would make sense. But Mexican bean beetles and Cucumber beetles also look like ladybugs, I'll include a side by side comparison picture. From left to right, ladybug, mexican bean beetle, and cucumber beetle: From ...


10

Pollination is probably the issue - the cucumber is formed behind a female flower, but if the flower does not get pollinated, then it yellows, shrivels and drops off. You haven't said whether you're growing under glass (less likely to be pollinated by insects) or not, but you can hand pollinate - take a small paintbrush, grasp the male flower (the ones ...


9

I'm thinking too that now would be a good time to transplant it into a larger container. In my experience, cukes don't do very well when they get root bound, and it looks like that is a definite possibility for you.


9

I have heard that letting them get too large makes them sour/bitter. According to: https://bonnieplants.com/growing/growing-cucumbers/ They say, "Don’t let the cucumbers get oversized or they will be bitter, and will also keep the vine from producing more."


9

No, there isn't. Providing you check them for flavor and make sure they haven't aged too far. At about 2 inches diameter. Larger than that and you'll start noticing flavor change and flesh hardening which is the important indicator that they've gone too far. As long as the skin is soft, there is no flavor change and the flesh is fully moist, you will have a ...


8

A couple of things to look for other than the feel (they should be firm if you can find a spot to squeeze them where they aren't too prickly). Some amount of spines are normal on all cucumbers, but this one looks especially spiny. Color: they should be medium to dark green. this depends on the cultivar though, some of them will be different colors. from the ...


8

I think you have Cucumber mosaic virus, because of the mosaicing, curling, and drying of the leaves, and the stop in production, plus the time frame of infection matches perfectly. There is no cure. What you can do is try to keep it from spreading, which is done by removing affected plants from the environment. Burn or seal them in bags to prevent the virus ...


7

Pumkins, squash and cucumbers all are pretty easy to propagate by seed. The important part is letting the fruit ripen thoroughly so the seeds finish formation. So, you have to let one of your Zucchini or Cucumbers completely harden up (develop a rind) and change to full ripe color, ie leave it on the vine till the vine's nearing death. Winter Squash tend ...


7

You don't say where you are growing your cucumbers. (IE, greenhouse, outside, covered bed, etc.) If you could give more information it would be helpful. The kind of intense pruning you are talking about is generally only done for cucumbers being grown intensively, and especially those grown in greenhouses where growing space is very expensive and diseases ...


6

So you probably already have decently-growing cucumbers at this point but I wanted to weigh in on this. If you planted the seeds upside down they'd mostly right themselves and grow the right way. Robert Krulwich from NPR had a good post on this here. A sideways seed won't have to right itself so it will shoot up faster. The cling film helps to do two ...


6

What you have is classic Chlorosis. Leaves dark near the veins, yellowing in the areas between. Basically, it's the equivalent of anemia. The chlorophyll in plants is related to hemoglobin in blood in that it requires iron. This plant needs to be in a much larger pot with some actual soil in it. Potting soil while fluffy and great for getting plants ...


6

I believe those are flea beetles, from the family Chrysomelidae. They can be a bad pest, but I have successfully ridded them from my property, and haven't seen one here for some time. I've successfully used neem oil, but I use 2% mix, which is twice as strong as what you used. Maybe that explains why it worked so well for me. Here are some of the ideas I'...


5

Surely, it's lack of pollination. For the two years past, I had to hand pollinate my squash plants. This year, however, I see bees on the flowers, and I'm getting lots of squash. I live in Renton, Washington, and I don't see many bad bugs. I see that many of you recommend insecticides, which I never use. For one thing, insecticides are not specific to bad ...


5

I agree they're most likely flea beetles - close examination of the pics shows very small holes appearing in leaves. You can try this to control them: 2 parts rubbing alcohol, 5 parts water and 1 tablespoon of liquid soap, mixed in a sprayer, spray all leaves, including the backs, till run off. This 'recipe' is from the Old Farmers Almanac - the only thing ...


5

Wilting is a sign of stress, and not harmful in itself, as long as it doesn’t dry to the point that the vascular tissue is damaged. When that happens the water column is broken and transpiration stops. I had a professor in college who was a plant physiologist, his field of study had to do with the physiology of plant vascular systems. That was a very boring ...


5

Check if the back of the leaves hides little parasites. Check if it could had had too cold or changes of temperature. Give manure and sequestrene (iron), maybe it has grown too quickly and has used all the nutrients. They need to be watered 2 times a day, only on the ground and not on the leaves. If everything you checked is good, try some anti fungal, it ...


5

OK it's food, green leaves at the top, leaves yellowing at the bottom and working its way up, until the leaf goes brown, drops off or you cut it off because it looks ugly and makes the plant look sick. THE CURE Magnesium sulphate 100% in Epsom salts from your chemists, 2 tablespoons full in 1 gallon of water, soak the leaves in it, not using a watering ...


5

The strong green veins with white in between indicate a lack of Iron. I used Iron chelate to treat this in other plants.


5

Some people call it a hammerhead. Some will tell you to just leave it and it will come off on it's own and if you try to remove it you risk damaging the plant. In my experience, if the seed shell is still attached to both cotyledons (the first seed leaves) then it usually doesn't come off on its own. In some cases the cotyledons will grow out anyway but ...


5

No a single plant can produce many cucumbers at once. It mostly depends on how long the cucumber vine as able to grow before flowering. The first flower is usually male, the ones that follow are the females and what produce the fruit.


5

A lot of things could be happening. Lack of nutrients or too much fertilizer. Could also be the ph. Test the soil. Cucumbers like a ph of about 5.5. I would also put mulch on the ground around them so the soil stays moist for a longer period. The ground looks very dry.


5

It's true that cucumbers are best planted as seed in the location in which they will grow. There are however many considerations to work through when contemplating a relocation. What I'm thinking in this situation... Leave in small pots: no risk of transplant shock; water daily; apply tonic (such as seaweed emulsion) weekly; apply fertiliser ...


5

I don't see why you couldn't. Where I live, it's USDA zone 8a and my parents always grew them. I never thought of them as rare but few people knew what they were. I'd say they're more akin in flavour to the long English cucumbers but a little juicier. Their skin is nicely thin so no peeling is needed. The tiny spines on the skin are soft and can be rubbed ...


5

Remove it. I don't think it is a tumor. Tumor are relatively rare in vegetables, because of short lifetime, and having a lot (really a lot) more genes. I think it is caused by insects (or other animals, or maybe also weather), which damages and blocked the central part. The other part grow "inorganically" around damages part. But are you sure it is a ...


5

Female flowers are the fewest on the main stem and their number is greatest on 3rd level of ramifications. Also, when the plant is young it will produce a female flower for every 10 male flowers, and the number of female flowers grows with the plant's age. Drought results in more male flowers. Low temperatures results in more female flowers. Update: As ...


4

doesn't look like nutrients... usually the old leaves would still be green and the new ones would be chlorotic... Looks honestly like heat stress, was it in a hot window?


4

Calcium deficiency. In addition to the answer about chlorosis being like anemia, that's really not as far off as it may sound since anemia is in essence a shortage of Iron. An iron deficiency can be the root cause of multiple nutrient deficiencies, even when those nutrients are in the soil and available to the plants. Iron is what allows a plant to absorb ...


4

Probably transition shock - your description of what you did does not include a period of hardening off for the plants, so if they were under shelter or inside originally, then planting them straight out without hardening off means they've responded to the cooler/colder conditions by producing whitened areas and a bit of die off. The only thing is, when I ...


4

I think that's Bacterial Wilt, Erwinia tracheiphila. Cucumber bacterial wilt is caused by the bacterium, Erwinia tracheiphila, and is characterized initially by wilting and drying of individual leaves, especially those exhibiting cucumber beetle injury. Cucumbers and muskmelons are more susceptible than pumpkins or squash; the disease is rarely a problem on ...


4

I'm not a hundred percent sure, but my guess is downy mildew or maybe cucumber mosaic virus. For cucumber mosaic virus, I don't know if there's any treatment in this generation. Downy mildew tends to cause yellow chlorotic blocky chunks on the leaves of cucumbers like that. Downy mildew prefers moist conditions (unlike powdery mildew, which prefers it dry, ...


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