24

Why do you have to buy compost resources? Are you not able to make it yourself? You need greens and browns, microbes will enter the process for free. There are many posts about how to make compost, for example here. If you have space for compost heaps I would just start gathering greens and browns yourself.


24

The way i was taught composting is, fence off a piece of soil, and just chuck stuff in. Nature will do the rest. Worms, bacteria, insects will do all the needed eating of biggies, sugars, etc.. and convert it to sweet stuff for plants. Dig it up, mash it around once a week to properly mix everything and you have a nice compost stewing. Stuff will decompose ...


17

A huge loud no. Part of you wants to garden. The other part is afraid of insects. There is no way you can do both. And you live in paradise. I wish I could just give you what I know about insects...they are so dang amazing, very cool and we humans could not survive at all without them. Very few insects are 'bad' guys. Seriously. There is not one ...


13

You don't need to purchase microbes in order to compost stuff (the purchased products look like they're just supposed to speed up the process). Microbes are naturally on the vegetable scraps you put in the compost, in the air, in the soil, and all over other stuff. If there were no microbes, the food wouldn't rot. Just look up how to compost stuff online. I'...


12

In short, no. Insects and other life forms within the soil (and there are billions, many of which you cannot see without a strong microscope, such as bacteria) are an essential part of an eco system, and life cannot exist without them. No one wants rats near or in their houses, or even in a garden, but insects are a critical part of bio diversity. Some, in ...


7

This is another case of "dog vomit slime mold", or Fuligo septica. It pops up unannounced, often on wood chips (which I see isn't your case here), and spreads a little bit, but in sort of a limited way. By that I mean it gets a little bigger, but doesn't really spread past the immediate area that it started in. It goes through a definite short lifecycle, ...


7

Personally, I like the separation. It will keep the back of the bed from rotting due to moisture trapped between the house and the raised bed. It looks like your siding could be wood, and putting wood up against other wood is never a good idea (insects, rot, and fungi can run amok in all that dark and damp). Even if your siding is vinyl or fiber-cement you'...


7

Perhaps there is some confusion here in regard to what method of composting these 'suppiers' are talking about. If you're using the Bokashi system, then you do need to buy an activated mix when you refill your bucket - but you also need to bury the contents in soil when they're fermented enough. It depends how much space you've got for composting - a ...


6

Welcome to Vegetable Gardening! To start off, you want to prepare your soil. Mix some soil, compost and fertilizer in the planter. I prefer organic material but that is optional. In terms of spacing, that is generally provided on the seed packets. Take a look at the packet and it will give you recommendations on how far to space the seeds for planting. ...


5

I recognize this plant as I was weeding one out today. It is Creeping bellflower, Campanula rapunculoides. Although many Campanula are welcome additions to the garden and well behaved this one is not. Identification points: hairy stems heart-shaped, irregularly toothed leaves white tubers can be found by digging up the area tubular blue flowers on a long ...


5

Any wood will rot when in contact with moisture. It's just a question of how long. As a DIY project if you are happy with it lasting a few years then what you have is fine. There are those among us who aspire to build long term. I am usually reminded of this when I want to change something in my garden and find it to be immovable. Then I know I was having ...


5

I really wouldn't advise it - human faecal waste is processed and used as fertilizer even in the UK, although most of it is used by the agricultural industry. But its the 'processed' part that counts. The treatment process produces biosolids which are 99.99% free of pathogens, because human faecal matter can contain a startling array of really quite nasty ...


5

Listed as highly toxic if ingested, so as long as no one eats it, should be fine. Not listed as causing contact reactions such as dermatitis http://ucanr.edu/sites/poisonous_safe_plants/Toxic_Plants_by_Scientific_Name_685/ This information here is quite interesting - it confirms its toxicity, but the leaves are apparently used by local people for various ...


5

While the two existing No answers are generally correct, there is a Yes answer, here it is. Yes; but it is not simple. You have to have a place to grow the plants that is insect free, then you have to add plants that don't have insects on them. The easiest way to do this is growing from seed in a Hydroponic Garden. Many plants depend on insects for ...


5

With greenhouse plastic there are some issues to keep in mind. First, if you are considering a longer term installation then UV light will quickly shatter regular plastic. UV resistant plastics are available. Even then your max lifetime is about 4 years. The second issue is abrasion. With expansion and contraction of the plastic sheet the plastic cover is ...


4

I am glad you will start with 'starts' or plants grown from a seed to a decent size. The least expensive pots are black plastic. You can get them from a nursery very cheaply. Any pot with a drainage hole at the bottom will work. For aesthetics try to keep your pots all the same. You could add a few nicer looking pots but make sure they 'match'. Too ...


4

You should be able to grow a few things here. I think the two biggest things to consider are compact size and heat tolerance. As you can water in the morning and evening, drought tolerance in't entirely necessary. Here are some veggies I would try: Peppers, specifically dwarf 'patio' types, like Redskin Dwarf Sweet Pepper Cucumbers, which you may want to ...


4

Let me give you my experiences on container gardening. It is by no means complete and you will always have to consider the plants' demands on sun, water and nutrition, container gardening is not much different from "regular" gardening in these aspects. Strawberries are very easy to grow in window boxes. We have been doing this for years now. What I like ...


4

The problem with that design is that all raised beds have a problem with drying out readily. This design doesn't allow for much tolerance to keep water in the box, but only prevents over watering. So it shares the same fault as every garden pot with a drainage hole or holes. It would be better to line the bottom with impervious plastic to a depth of 2 ...


4

Another possibility, related to that suggested by @Tschallacka, is to engage in vermiculture inside your home. A box approximately 60cm x 60cm x 45cm, which can contain the food scraps and some shredded newspaper, with a lid, is about the size I used for several years. You'd want to locate some Eisenia fetida, and you need to make sure the box has good ...


3

Looks like Hymenocallis speciosa, but I am not certain.


3

It's certainly possible to create a 'roof' or balcony garden, but not easily. The depth of soil to aim for is preferably not less than 18 inches, and usually, drainage pipes are laid into the roof/balcony prior to installation, to deal with excess water for drainage purposes. What you're proposing won't really work, drainage will be very poor, and if the ...


3

The answer is yes, you can grow all these things as potted plants in zone 8a. Carrots however may not grow as well, since you are trying to grow a taproot to eat. You may wish to consider larger than ordinary container with vertical walls so the carrots don't grow up to the sides of the pot. I am not sure how much carrot produce you will be able to produce ...


3

No, the word grill is fine here - I just wanted to know whether this grill enclosed the whole balcony, or whether it was just at the bottom, or, as it turns out, with a wall and then a grill right to the roof. It's not that easy an area to plant with large, beautiful plants - if you use climbing plants, unless you keep them very well trained, they will grow ...


3

Think Vertical Gardening (Google it for ideas, images). I recommend basil, Ginger, Turmeric, and herbs of your choice. Rosemary, lemon grass, and oregano are easy to grow.


3

If you want to plant gardenia cuttings there are two schools of thought. Both require the same preparation: Use soft wood, that means the green top part of the twig, about 3-4 in / 10 cm long. Cut off any flowers and flower buds. Your cutting would waste energy and water on them. Remove all but the top two pairs of leaves, possibly leave only one pair. The ...


3

You can try some of these calendars for Arizona http://www.ufseeds.com/Arizona-Vegetable-Planting-Calendar.html http://www.almanac.com/gardening/planting-dates/AZ/Phoenix


3

In theory I'd use separate small pots because the plants have different rates of growing and might require different watering schedules. Some of them tolerate shade (mint), others need a lot of light (peppers) and keeping them in separate pots allows you to move them if needed. In practice, every year I have at least one long pot with two or three species ...


3

All I know is that mint can really take over a garden, so it should be planted in a separate container. I leave the rest for a more experienced grower to comment :)


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