9

In the UK, where I live, none of this is necessary, so I've just been researching this subject. It seems that what you are doing, all parts of the procedure, are essential if you want your roses to survive undamaged through such hard winter weather. Primarily, mounding up is to protect the graft union, because if that gets damaged, the graft will fail; the ...


8

Actually.. Here's a study that shows tomatoes do pretty well in a 24 hour continuous, but they varied the temperature and they didn't get the spotting that had occurred with 24h lighting in the past. Did better than the 16 hour light / 8 hour dark, anyways. http://hortsci.ashspublications.org/content/40/2/374.full.pdf


8

Moreover, in my biology courses, we learned how (most) plants have a two-phase cycle: an anaerobic one (i.e. “breathing” CO2) during the day, and an aerobic one (“breathing” O2) at night. Wrong. There are two main cycles of photosynthesis colloquially called light and dark cycles. The light cycle requires light. The dark cycle does not require dark. It ...


8

The general rule is that if the plants are hardy two zones colder than where you live, they'll be fine outside in pots. So for you that would mean they'll be fine if the plants are hardy to zone 4. If they are not hardy down to zone 4 or you just want a little extra insurance there are still a few things you could try: Clustering the pots and then ...


8

If you are in a place that's so consistently cold that it occurs to you to set up a backyard skating rink that means it gets really cold throughout the winter. What the ice and plastic has done is insulated the grass below from the wind and colder temperature. It may seem counter intuitive but the ice was actually helping keep the cold wind from lowering the ...


7

Your profile reports your location as Portland, Oregon, so I'll assume that's where the dahlias we want to overwinter are located. Let Dahlia tubers remind you of Goldilocks and the Three Bears--we don't want things "too" anything, we want things just right. Don't dig too soon, don't dig too late. Dig them up ten days or so after the first freeze or, if ...


7

Yes, the colour will block some light, but not too much. The only reason they sell these green plastic coverings on a frame is because they're thought to be more aesthetically pleasing than looking at clear plastic, and because the material they're made from is somewhat tougher than clear plastic.


7

The term you are looking for is perennial, describing plants that can live for many years. Your rosemary, thyme and peppermint fall in that category. Of these, rosemary is the most frost-sensitive, but hardyness varies somewhat between cultivars. Note that rosemary originally comes from the Mediterranean with it's mild winters. I am a bit pragmatic when ...


7

In general, wind chill on its own isn't an issue for hardy plants; however, wind chill combined with below freezing temperatures may cause problems in a few hardy plant stems and leaves. Air in winter (in colder regions) is already pretty dry, and that reduces the amount of fluid in soil and in plant stems; if there's a strong wind chill added on top, then ...


7

I am zone USDA zone 3 b to 4 and you can't kill blackberry plants. I have mine growing with morning sun in a raised bed beside a concrete foundation. Every year, dead to the ground, every year eight to nine feet tall in the autumn. Don't bother with any extra work, cut them back to the ground in the fall and stand back in the spring. I do top dress with ...


6

I get the same problem with my lupines every year and about this time I harvest the seeds and cut them back. They always grow back and often I get some flowers again in September. I cut mine last week. That was the end of the first week of July. Good luck.


6

The answer is the one I hate the most: it depends... Factors influencing your decision include: aesthetics: glass looks better than plastic if you are putting a greenhouse close to your house local climate: if it gets cold where you are then the material best suited for the snow load and that provides the most heat retention will be a better choice even if ...


6

The little starts you buy at the grocery store have recently undergone a huge amount of stress, and wilting after being brought home is relatively common. They are usually grown fast in a greenhouse, sometimes with supplementary CO2 to promote fast growth. They are then packed and shipped (ground or air and ground) for hours, sometimes over a day. This ...


6

Yes, cold paired with no snow cover is hard on top growth, but garlic cloves will survive the winter in zone 6b (where I am also, incidentally). In my area, it's common for the top growth to die back completely during winter, and come back in the spring.


6

I am trying this right now. I have some transplanted into cold frames with an additional cone of opaque greenhouse film over them and christmas lights available for the coldest nights. It's been about 40-55 degree in the cold frame pretty steadily so far in this warm Dec of 2015. I left the leaves on some and denuded others that had partial frost damage. ...


6

If you're worried about freezing, keep them warm somehow (heat mat/cold frame/both). If you want to boost photosynthesis use lights (not UV, but red and blue). So the first thing is to decide what you'd like to achieve. Attempting to warm the plants using lights is unlikely to work unless you use incandescent lights all night in a greenhouse -- they don't ...


6

Hardwood cuttings work best for mulberry; though you haven't said which variety of Acer you're trying to propagate,softwood cuttings are more likely to be successful,or from seed. Softwood cuttings are taken earlier in the year, around May or June in the northern hemisphere - more info on that here http://homeguides.sfgate.com/propagate-red-maples-23902.html ...


6

In general, no mulch should be piled up against a woody trunk or woody stem. If you're using straw for insulation purposes because winter is coming, just leave a little clear space, an inch or two all round, the trunk, but if you're covering up herbaceous perennial plants which disappear below ground in winter, you don't need to worry, you can just heap it ...


6

I'll help with a few suggestions on pruning. First however, you need to know that those leaves FEED your plant. Topping to make a plant thicker is fine but this usually works best with lots of sun. Your plant is struggling to make enough food for itself. It is long and lanky because it is not getting enough light. The leaves get thin and larger to be ...


6

Minnesota can have a 20 degree temperature range in the winter, depending on where you live; here's the map. I'm assuming that you're in or near Minneapolis (Zone 4a), where it might hit -30 F in winter. I've lived in Zone 4b (gardening in nearly 100% clay, too), and I could grow pretty much anything that anyone else north of St. Louis can grow - I just had ...


6

Yes, they will growth again. Potatoes are the winter house of potato plant (Solanum tuberosum). But you will have too many plants. I think in spring, you should harvest them and replant some of them (as the original distance). If you will do this early in spring, you can eventually eat the rest of potatoes, you should check visually that they are still ...


5

I would like to point out that plants do not have an "anaerobic" phase. Plants ALWAYS "breathe" O2. Just the net balance during the day is the production of O2 by photosynthesis because that only occurs under influence of light. Basically two reactions occur: (Simplified) reaction one: glucose (C6H12O6) + 6 O2 --> 6 H2O + 6 CO2 (+ heat) This reaction ...


5

You need to distinguish between vegging and flowering when it comes to light cycles! Vegging light cycle can be 18-24 hours under MH (Metal Halide with a good Daylight Spectrum Bulb) or fluorescent lights (T5's are great). For flowering, cycle 12 hours on, 12 hours off with a good HPS (High Pressure Sodium) bulb.


5

My experience is limited to Venus flytrap plants in Scotland, but I found that through the winter the plants growth slowed right down along with the lack of insects. There were a few bugs that we fed to the plants, but only around one a month, and the plants just picked up their activity in the spring as the insects started to increase in numbers.


5

I received an answer from an OGrow representative. OGrow is a manufacturer of greenhouses. Me: Can we get an official response on how to choose between the green and clear coverings? I'm mainly going to grow fruit trees and shrubs. Would fruit trees do better with the clear covering because bit provides full sun? OGrow: While we cannot ...


5

Several of the answers here are incorrect. Green plastic absorbs green light or reflects it which is why it appears green. Green is chosen because if you want to reduce the light intensity to the inside of the greenhouse, you use green because it's not used by the plants to any significant degree. The filtering is not perfect which is why you might still ...


5

In my experience here on the edge of zones 4 and 5, fall is a fine time to plant perennials and small fruits. I've planted as late as early October with no winter protection other than a few inches of mulch and the plants do just fine. You're a zone warmer planting a month earlier, so it seems it will be even less of a worry for you. I'd just mulch them ...


5

Plant your rosemary outside. It does horribly inside. There should be enough time for it to acclimate and put down some roots before it freezes. Don't fertilize it with a product high in nitrogen! Make sure the first number is lower than the last two. NPK, nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium; you'll see 3 numbers on the package. The first number should ...


5

Do it. Pussywillows are tough. If you can dig the hole, you can plant the tree. Roots will stay active until the ground freezes hard. Be even with your packing. Late fall planting results in non-consolidated soil when it freezes. This is more likely to heave. Now you don't really care that it heaves, but you do want the tree to stay plumb. With a ...


5

The stress from overwintering and moving will detract from the advantage given by the advanced growth of the plant, and they will likely not produce near as much as a regular crop. If they are overwintered in a cool environment, so as to impede growth (otherwise the plant will age out) and keep all beans (if any) picked as they appear, you will get an early ...


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