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9

You can try rooting it if you want by snipping the stem just below a bud at the base, stripping off the thorns and leaves, leaving one leaf at the top if you like, but you can take them all off, and inserting it into a sharp sand or sand/compost mix in a deep pot. The stem should be around 9 inches long, and you need to bury it so that only a quarter of the ...


9

Yes, they have a good chance - as my Mum has proven multiple times. Because she was always very busy, she just put the entire root ball into the ground, no further fussing. Admittedly, she just couldn't stand the idea of throwing healthy plants on the compost just because they were done flowering (she never bought them, but was given them as a gift - instead ...


9

It's next to impossible to give a 100% definite ID I'm afraid - it might help if you could provide a close up of a fully open flower and a bud that's showing colour but nowhere near open to decide whether its an HT or floribunda rose, but on current showing, it would appear to be a floribunda, possibly something like 'Mardi Gras' but there are literally ...


9

In the UK, where I live, none of this is necessary, so I've just been researching this subject. It seems that what you are doing, all parts of the procedure, are essential if you want your roses to survive undamaged through such hard winter weather. Primarily, mounding up is to protect the graft union, because if that gets damaged, the graft will fail; the ...


8

To answer your first question, I'm not sure what kind of chemicals store bought roses are usually treated with. Short answer: a lot. These flowers (especially when they're roses) don't really have much room for defects, so pesticides are applied heavily as a preventative, even when there are no symptoms of disease or pests on the plants. Most of these ...


8

They are not baby spiders, but you are not too far off target. They are Spider Mites. Spider mites drink the sap of plants and in great enough numbers they can cause severe damage. The webbing is also from them, they produce it in an attempt to protect themselves from predators and to shield themselves from unfavorable climate conditions. Spider mites are ...


8

All plants should have pots matching the plant size, otherwise you risk root-bound plants or trouble with watering. That's why we re-pot as needed and only go up a few pot sizes at a time. Roses like to go deep with their roots, so I would aim for a pot of ca. 5 cm / 2 inches height right now, once the seedling is established, take it from there. ...


8

I'm not an entomologist but by googling, it looks to be a Rose Weevil or Fuller Rose Beetle aka Naupactus (Asynonychus) godmani. It doesn't look like it's a goodie to have on your roses The damage done by this beetle is to the foliage of the host plant by the adults and the root system is damaged by the larvae. Death of the host rose bush is a very ...


7

I have a Zephirine Drouhin Rose that has been growing in USDA zone 4 for two years. It puts on a great show, grows fast, resistant to powdery mildew but it is not thornless. Compared to the shrub roses I have you can work with it without gloves. There are not many thorns, perhaps one every inch on the larger stems only. The thorns are a 1/4" in length ...


7

Not all roses produce seeds, some are infertile. These can be reproduced only by vegetative means. If it were not for the continuous intervention of man, they would already extinct. Fruits are called "hips". The roses ripen their seeds in different eras. Some seeds are ready and will be collected in July, others in August, others in November. For all we ...


7

I have an Explorer rose that is almost three meters tall. At one point in time I wanted to get rid of it and dug down to the roots. I used a spade, a saw and eventually, an axe. Despite removing roots as thick as my arm it was impossible to kill. Next year it put on the best flower show ever and I have since learned to love it... at a distance. The books ...


7

It is not a rose, but a fern. Fern usually have sori (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sorus), which are used to disperse spores. Ferns have no flowers, so no seeds. Note the white flowers come from a different plant, which is also not a rose, but I cannot identify it.


6

It sounds like you have powdery mildew (whitish film on stems and leaves) and rose rot (orange spots) and blackspot, "Diplocarpon rosae". That is quite a handful of problems for a rose but there is nothing here that good garden practices, soil amendment and some control measures like sulphur can't handle. Here are my suggestions: remove all debris from ...


6

Either soap and water applied at 5 to 6 days intervals with particular attention being paid to get good coverage on the underside of the leaves or keeping the rose outside would solve this problem. This answer is very detailed; I recommend looking at it.


6

There are many types of roses. I'll list a few here that are more common in modern times, with identifying features. Hybrid Tea: These are the result of crossing hybrid perpetuals with tea roses. These are upright, robust plants with long cane growth and less branching than some. Thorniness varies. The flowers are large, usually single, with high centers. ...


6

Bamboo's answer is good. I agree with everything stated there, just wanted to add the method I used when I did this years ago. I recut the cut ends (flat, and clean), but then topped the stems off (they were really long, so removed about half), leaving them at 9-10 inches. I cut about 1/4" above a large healthy leaf. Then I removed the leaves halfway up the ...


6

I bought this rose at rite aid on clearance two years ago. We put it in water, and the stem never turned brown. After about 9 months in a glass of water, I put it in soil. It grew a bunch of new branches, and about two weeks ago I saw a bud. I took this photo this morning. So, for people who say it can't re-root or grow new flowers, they are wrong! This is ...


6

These are most likely rose suckers. You should trace it down to where they are originating from (most likely below where your rose was grafted). If that is the case, you want to remove it ASAP from it's point of origination otherwise it sucks away the nutrients thereby deriving and hurting your rose plant. Another indication is that the suckers have 7 ...


6

In the UK, I'd describe this as a 'single or single row wooden pergola', but have seen them sometimes called an arch. Here's an example of a single pergola, shown with a trellis infill https://www.jacksons-fencing.co.uk/fencing/secret-garden-collection/pergolas-single/secret-garden-collection-pergolas-single.aspx


5

I would add 1" "a bunch"* of compost and dig it into the topsoil, but I wouldn't mix it into the subsoil. The benefit of double-digging is that you can break up the subsoil. But you don't want to mix your soil layers, and adding compost to your subsoil isn't helpful. I'm somewhat skeptical of importing worms: if you have poor soil, you won't have worms. ...


5

I wish the picture was clearer, but that side shoot looks a bit thin and weak. Roses root easily from cuttings, but you need a stem that either hasn't flowered, or all the flowers have gone, and it should be a young shoot, feeling firm and turgid and usually a bit thicker than that side shoot, more the thickness of the main stem in the picture. They also ...


5

Soft water: I don't know if "soft water" is the correct translation. I mean non calcareous water. A good cut: You have to avoid crushing the xylem. Use precision scissors or an scalpel (cutter). If your really want a long lasting rose, make a new cut every day (or at least three days) to make sure the xylem remain open. Removes what is not necessary: ...


5

It's probably not the particular vase, but the amount of moisture the roots can get from more of the stems being submerged in water.I noticed the glass vase had very ample water and the ceramic has to hold more to be able to hold the roses upright as it is showing. I can also give you some tips on how to preserve your fresh cut roses longer. use 1 Tsp of ...


5

I'm presented with what looks like two completely opposite issues - the flower has suffered balling, and that is usually caused by damp cool conditions, in particular, rain, but the leaves appear to be suffering from drought/heat. I suppose there might be an explanation - perhaps, when you watered these in to their new pots (and I hope you did) you watered ...


5

I'd be interested to know how much sun this one gets planted where it is - roses always do better if they get as much sun as possible, and yours may be growing upwards in a desperate effort to find more sun or light. This one's ultimate height is 1.5 metres, which is quite tall for a hybrid tea rose, and might mean this is its growth habit anyway, though it ...


5

I was just about to say the same as Gardener J - probably spider mites, yes, and neem oil, yes, but first you could just try spraying with water frequently, on the tops and undersides of the leaves and all the stems - spider mites like hot and dry conditions and will absolutely not appreciate wet or damp leaves and stems, so this will help by making the ...


5

Roses supplied in the condition you describe are known as 'bare root' in the UK, so 'nude root' is just another way of saying the same thing. Both these roses need to be planted in the ground, outdoors - pot growing will restrict their roots and growth and they may not develop and flower very well kept in pots, although it's fine initially. Mr. Lincoln is ...


5

Hmm, tough one because it's coming from the midpoint of the graft. Suckers are easy to distinguish if they grow from below soil level, or quite obviously below the whole graft. I would leave it for now - if it starts to grow much more rapidly than the other stems, shooting up to twice the height of the rest of the plant in short order, then cut it out where ...


5

Sawfly larvae is your problem with the white marks. Also, you need to get those flowers off your shrubs, do not allow them to go to seed, this reduces the vigor and the plant's own defenses.roses sawfly larvae


4

I will bet you are not watering enough. In that sort of weather tomatoes in pots probably need to be watered every day. Maybe more often than that if the pots are standard clay pots, not plastic which doesn't dry out quite as fast. The tunnel-like marks could be leaf miner but I will bet that is related to the lack of water. Leaf miner is not that common ...


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