11

The harm potential for overgrown perennials is largely cosmetic, but in a severe enough case it is possible for it to become a health issue. When perennial plants with shared root systems, such as Astilbe, Hostas etc. become very large the center of the plant may begin to wilt, decline or even die out completely. The easiest fix for the problem is to divide ...


10

That's a freesia, a group of iris-relatives. Due to their interesting flower shape, strong scent and comparatively low "fussyness" they have been cultivated and hybridized a lot over time. They come in a wide range of colours and sizes. Many of us will know them as cut flower where they contribute scent and visual interest to bouquets; because the ...


10

That looks like fine root hairs on the hypocotyl of a normal , healthy seedling still in the cotyledon stage. These root hairs greatly increase the surface area of the root and are thought to aid in nutrient absorption, anchorage and microbial interactions. Edit: It does look like the root has pushed the seedling out of the medium though (maybe they are ...


9

First, there are lots of 'Thymes'. But the most common culinary thyme is Thymus vulgaris. It's a small perennial woody shrub or subshrub (having only some woody stems, near the base), native to the Mediterranean region. Most cultivars are quite hardy and easy to grow. They prefer dry conditions, but will tolerate areas with a bit more moisture if given ...


9

It happens occasionally - not uncommon in chilli pepper, tomatoes and cannabis plants. It doesn't seem to confer any advantage and usually, the seedling continues to grow normally, with two true leaves when they appear, although occasionally, three true leaves appear and you get a more branched plant, albeit usually slower growing and not so tall. Just one ...


8

Asarum canadense,canada wild ginger. Positive Id can be confirmed on the flowers of which two are just visible at the base of the stem. Relatively common to most of eastern North America. In my garden not a delicate wildflower but a slowly spreading groundcover that is fairly tough in hot and dry conditions as long as the soil is fairly rich pollinated by ...


8

The plant pictured is Persicaria virginiana 'Painter's Palette'. The mottled green and white variegation, the leaf shape, and especially, the reddish chevrons make the identification unmistakable. The alternate leaves and stem appearance reinforce the id. The plant will grow in full sun if it is provided adequate water, but is happier in part-shade. It is ...


8

Day lilies are perennial, yes but they are not A perennial. The group of plants called Perennials are grouping plants that share the same root structure. That's like Mums and montauk daisies. Daylilies are actually in the bulb group. Each Daylily is its own independent bulb. Now, bulbs also can benefit from being split by giving them more room to divide ...


8

Well they're Yucca - I think they're Yucca flaccida rather than Yucca aloifolia (Spanish Bayonet) because the outermost leaves appear to be flopping outwards rather than remaining upright. Although I can't see any filaments dangling from the edges of the leaves, if there are lots of them, then its Yucca filamentosa. Pic of Yucca flaccida in the link below ...


7

Monarda (bee balm) likes damp, enriched soil, but also likes a lot of sun. They often don't flower in their first year, but I'd have expected flowers in its second year, certainly. If it dries out frequently, you may not get flowers, and depending on which variety you're growing, it might not be getting enough sun. If the soil it's growing in is poor and ...


7

Firstly, most grasses won’t do well indoors, so you’ll probably have to go along with a look-alike. Secondly, I don’t have edibility info on the plants I will recommend. Do not ingest any parts of those plants until you have it from a reliable source that the part is edible. The plants listed below should last indefinitely with proper care, rarely need ...


7

Annual means that the plant has a full life cycle (seed-to-seed cycle) in at most one year. It will germinate, bloom and die that year. This is not a calendar year per se. Some species germinate in autumn, survive through the winter and bloom next spring. A good example is the French Marigold. A biennial plant takes two years to complete it's life cycle. It ...


7

The term you are looking for is perennial, describing plants that can live for many years. Your rosemary, thyme and peppermint fall in that category. Of these, rosemary is the most frost-sensitive, but hardyness varies somewhat between cultivars. Note that rosemary originally comes from the Mediterranean with it's mild winters. I am a bit pragmatic when ...


7

Nothing lasts forever.The term perennial simply means a plant that will last for more than 2 years. That can mean 3 years that can mean 50 years or more. As the plants age they can lose their ability to produce the same quantity or quality of fruit. Perennials don't live forever. They do eventually die or lose their ability to produce. For example ...


7

That is a very broad question - and there probably is no "one fits all" answer. I personally tend to leave most them alone in fall for four reasons: decorative purposes Many "spent" plant parts look spectacular when covered in frost and snow and give texture to borders that would otherwise look plain and empty. Some gardeners prefer the "clean" look, ...


6

Usually when I see button chrysanthemums (the most common kind) and Michaelmas daisies (Asters) labelled as annuals, which they are not, it's because they've been treated with carvacrol (C6H3CH3(OH)(C3H7)) or phosphon-D (tributyl-2, 4-dichlorobenzylphosphonium chloride), or a similar dwarfing agent. Of course, this treatment doesn't last forever, so when ...


6

Liriope muscari is rather challenging to grow from seed. For one thing, the pulp contains phenolic compounds which inhibit germination, so the seeds must be cleaned well before use. Seeds also have a morphological dormancy because the embryo is not fully developed when the fruit ripens, so a period of warm stratification is required to complete maturation. ...


6

Assuming the new ones you're seeing are fairly small, obviously new plants, then you've been lucky - this plant produces seed and it comes true from seed, so if you left the seed pods in place, they've opened and been dispersed (the seeds are often carried by ants, believe it or not), then germinated and grown where they've landed. Just means the ants either ...


6

It's listed as an annual many places because any amount of frost is likely to be fatal to an unprotected plant. Fortunately, in your zone frost is not really a certainty. If the winter is on the mild side (for your climate) your coleus could probably make it through unprotected. If you make an effort to shelter the plant; coverings, mulching around the ...


6

This is Hepatica nobilis (also Anemone hepatica). It grows on forests. An other name is Hepatica triloba because of the form on leaves. [And there is also a Vinca minor]


6

Sedum spectabile - there's more than one pink variety, and one with darker more reddish flowers called 'Autumn Joy'. It's an herbaceous perennial, hardy, and the flowers are popular with some butterflies. Common name Ice plant (Sedum spectabile).


6

This is Galanthus nivalis and it grows from perennial bulbs, that's why it comes back every year. If you want it to spread, separate the bulbs every few years. If you want to get rid of it, dig out the bulbs and cut the leaves as early as possible for the ones that you miss when digging out.


5

How are you watering? You should water your plant slowly and deeply until water begins to run out of the bottom of the pot. If you water by just sprinkling a little on the top every day, then the root ball will eventually become dry and "case hardened" and the water will not soak in properly. This is especially a problem in hot, dry climates. If you are ...


5

Two possibilities: too dry, causing bud drop. spider mites. You can check on the underside of the leaves for small dots like grains of salt. If they are found then apply a spray of 5 ml dish soap to 1 litre of water three times at five to seven day intervals. Edit: by spraying at these intervals you catch the next generation of spider mites as they hatch ...


5

Because perennials generally last the longest, people often choose them first when designing their garden. Among other things, this broad category includes popular bulbs like tulips and daffodils, and flowers with many varieties, like lillies. Learn2Grow offers detailed information about annuals, biennials and perennials, as well as links to other sites. ...


5

I would assume that this is a member of the Aster family, probably a Heliantheae (Sunflower relative), either Heliopsis, aka Oxeye or Echinacea. This would mean that most likely it was planted and is just about to develop buds which should start opening by July. Then you should see yellow (-> Oxeye) or purple flowers (-> Echinacea), making identification ...


5

This is a member of the Yucca genus. There are numerous species with a wide range from Central America to southern Canada. Although the spiky leaves are a hazard the large white flowering stalk is very attractive and these plants are grown and planted for the landscape trade. It is not poisonous and a little first aid should resolve your wound. If this ...


5

Properly known as Nipponanthemum nipponicum these days, though it was once classifed as Leucanthemum and prior to that, Chrysanthemum. Its the usual method employed with other herbaceous perennials - you dig up the clump, split the rootball and replant the sections, watering in well afterwards. Sometimes, the central area of the plant, if it's a large clump, ...


5

Mums respond well to being divided, but you should wait until spring to do so. For now, leave the mums as-is. Since you live in a climate with a true winter, I would not recommend cutting the plants back this fall. Simply let them die back. After the ground has started to freeze, you can add mulch (straw, leaves, pine branches - whatever you have) to protect ...


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