12

It sounds as though you aren't keeping the cutting in a humidity tent. In other words, I think your basic problem is desiccation of the cutting. I've found it convenient to root cuttings in one gallon containers - 1 gallon zip lock bags fit snugly over the top. People frequently make little terrariums by cutting the bottom off 1 liter soft drink plastic ...


9

My suggestion is to begin by finding a picture of a bonsai that you would like to copy. You should find one with the same type, size and structure as the one you have. Regardless of the size of bonsai you have, the idea is to make it give the feeling of a tree in the wild. Just like art, it doesn't have to look exactly like a tree in the wild, it just has ...


9

No, don't cut this one back,it'll ruin its structure, and anyway, they bleed like crazy if you cut them. The thing to remember about any Ficus is they're fussy - they absolutely hate a change in conditions, and in particular, a draught. Indoors, most will drop leaves when the seasons change, so in spring and again in autumn, and mostly because the heating ...


9

You can try rooting it if you want by snipping the stem just below a bud at the base, stripping off the thorns and leaves, leaving one leaf at the top if you like, but you can take them all off, and inserting it into a sharp sand or sand/compost mix in a deep pot. The stem should be around 9 inches long, and you need to bury it so that only a quarter of the ...


8

Yeah, basically, cuttings are clones, so treat them as one plant when dealing with pollination. If the original plant couldn't self-pollinate, neither will the clones.


8

I cannot answer the detailed questions, but put the cuttings in a plastic zip-top bag with a few bits of damp paper/cardboard/sphagnum moss/etc. - seal it tightly, but leave as much air inside as is practical if they are leafed. It isn't essential, but the longer you can keep them refrigerated until you can strike them, the better. Also, if you have 3% ...


7

Yes, Mint is one of the most responsive plants to use by cutting. Cut just above a set of opposite leaves and 3-4 in. down from that for one cutting. Mint is very invasive, as long as you provide the right conditions it should continually be the same as the previous cutting. Just cut the flowers off and don't let it go to seed, this would go from cloning to ...


7

What is cascade style and what are the basic steps involved? Cascade style is where your tree trails down over the side of its pot. The overall most basic shape of a bonsai is a triangle, in order for your bonsai to maintain a nice shape you should be able to shape the tree around the idea of a triangle from the viewing side. The viewing side is the side of ...


7

Willow water could contain an unusually high amount of "phyto-hormones", which support the growth of roots. I think this will be an auxine-derivate, which the willow contains. Clear water doesn't contain those phyto-hormones. So plant and root-growth comes from the cuttings themselves. However, I'm not 100% sure. Conventional rooting hormones containing ...


7

The type of cutting you are talking about is mostly likely called a truncheon. Some trees will grow from this kind of cutting VERY well. Others not so well or not at all. A truncheon is usually a 3 foot long stem or branch as thick as your forearm. You denude the truncheon, then let is season for a day or two in the shade so the ends dry out (necessary to ...


7

I assume you're talking about rooting plants in soil. I'll describe the system I like to use, and tell you how I generally decide when they have roots. I imagine the way to tell may differ slightly depending on your rooting system, which is why I'm explaining mine. I pot the cutting in fresh seed-starting mix. I add a granulated 7-7-7 fertilizer and ...


7

I think you need to do a few things. First, put the cut end into a watered 'airy' medium like vermiculite or pearlite or even sphagnum (orchid moss) -many other things meet the need but aren't so commonly available. It will also help to dip the cut end into rooting hormone. I know the big box stores carry RooTone powder that will do what you need. It is ...


7

The term you need is actually 'vegetatively propagated' rather than 'cloned'. The answer is, essentially, yes, by and large, almost all plants can be vegetatively propagated, though different parts of the plant may be used and the methods used will vary, along with the level of difficulty. Parts which can be used include leaves, stems, shoots, bulbs, ...


7

From personal experience, I'd disagree with the statement that rooting hormones are ineffective, but it depends what you're using it for. I prefer the powder formulation to gels or liquids because there seems to be less chance of rot with the powder, and it has a longer shelf life, but essentially, rooting hormone preparations contain a chemical formula that,...


6

I don't think the problem is forsythia specific - I've had the same experience with peach cuttings. The first time I tried it I took the cuttings at the wrong time of year (ie. a different unrelated problem), but the second time I took them at the right time and I had one success out of about half a dozen cuttings. All of the failures in the second batch ...


6

It's a Chlorophytum comosum, commonly known as Spider Plant. It's not a 'hydroponic' plant though - the fact that it survives in water when you're getting it to grow roots is true of many plants. It will, though, prefer to be potted up into a growing medium eventually.


6

When taking cuttings from a plant, I try not to take more than 1/3 of the current healthy growth. For some plants, you shouldn't take even that much. As has been mentioned, mint is very prolific and a fast grower, so you should be just fine taking around 1/3 of the currently growing, healthy young branches each time you cut. Also, mint can be propagated ...


6

Bamboo's answer is good. I agree with everything stated there, just wanted to add the method I used when I did this years ago. I recut the cut ends (flat, and clean), but then topped the stems off (they were really long, so removed about half), leaving them at 9-10 inches. I cut about 1/4" above a large healthy leaf. Then I removed the leaves halfway up the ...


6

I bought this rose at rite aid on clearance two years ago. We put it in water, and the stem never turned brown. After about 9 months in a glass of water, I put it in soil. It grew a bunch of new branches, and about two weeks ago I saw a bud. I took this photo this morning. So, for people who say it can't re-root or grow new flowers, they are wrong! This is ...


6

It will grow fine. I ran some tests (slightly less scientifically than I could have, but got results) on grafting/propagation via cuttings using scions/cuttings from vigorous seedlings, older determinate, and older indeterminate tomato plants. Surprisingly, the differences were small/unnoticeable. The cuttings and grafts from the old determinate plants ...


6

There are two basic varieties of Epipremnum, or Pothos (Devils' Ivy in the UK, and often still referred to as Scindapsis, its original Latin name) - one is variegated and the other is plain green. These days there are a range of variegated ones, but the basic species is either variegated or non variegated. The variegated ones like more light, and if they are ...


6

Hardwood cuttings work best for mulberry; though you haven't said which variety of Acer you're trying to propagate,softwood cuttings are more likely to be successful,or from seed. Softwood cuttings are taken earlier in the year, around May or June in the northern hemisphere - more info on that here http://homeguides.sfgate.com/propagate-red-maples-23902.html ...


5

I had a hardwood branch break off from my lilac branch and stuck it in water. No rooting hormone. It is now growing roots.


5

From this site Propagation by cuttings is one of the most popular ways to propagate lilacs. Cuttings should be taken when new green terminal shoots are produced. They should be four to six inches long, but should not be left out too long, because they will wilt easily and die. The cutting should be dipped in a rooting hormone like IBA (...


5

I wish the picture was clearer, but that side shoot looks a bit thin and weak. Roses root easily from cuttings, but you need a stem that either hasn't flowered, or all the flowers have gone, and it should be a young shoot, feeling firm and turgid and usually a bit thicker than that side shoot, more the thickness of the main stem in the picture. They also ...


5

You can't beat RHS (Royal Horticultural Society) publications if you're in the UK - there's one called RHS Propagating Plants by Alan Toogood (available on Amazon), also RHS Handbook: Propagation Techniques, again available at Amazon, also available as a Kindle download.


5

Quick take them out of the water! Like most succulents they root by making a clean cut at the root end with a sharp knife or razor and letting it sit on the windowsill for a week or so. Then, once the wound has dried, place in damp sand and high light. Keeping sand damp is harder than it seems. Wet is no good, dry does not encourage roots. Do not cover ...


5

Having tried this (unsuccessfully) with "spring cuttings" (friends were moving and leaving their house with cherry tree, so it was then or never) my research into it suggested taking cuttings in the fall and letting them develop roots over the winter as being much more likely to succeed. As such, while you certainly could try to pack in damp newspaper and ...


5

Very much so. I have done similar cuts many times on cacti and succulents. If you cleanly cut off the top 6 inches or so and pot it up it should root quite easily. And then remove all but the bottom 6 inches and leave it to regrow and you will have two lovely cacti!


5

I've never bothered with drying them. I just plonk them vertically in some sandy soil - I may need to prop them up at first until roots grow. Then they will grow. It might take a while - cacti are slow growing, and it has to grow roots first. Ideally I try to take a cutting that has some buds - then you will see growth more quickly. The existing buds will ...


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