9

You can try rooting it if you want by snipping the stem just below a bud at the base, stripping off the thorns and leaves, leaving one leaf at the top if you like, but you can take them all off, and inserting it into a sharp sand or sand/compost mix in a deep pot. The stem should be around 9 inches long, and you need to bury it so that only a quarter of the ...


9

The term you need is actually 'vegetatively propagated' rather than 'cloned'. The answer is, essentially, yes, by and large, almost all plants can be vegetatively propagated, though different parts of the plant may be used and the methods used will vary, along with the level of difficulty. Parts which can be used include leaves, stems, shoots, bulbs, ...


8

Yeah, basically, cuttings are clones, so treat them as one plant when dealing with pollination. If the original plant couldn't self-pollinate, neither will the clones.


8

I assume you're talking about rooting plants in soil. I'll describe the system I like to use, and tell you how I generally decide when they have roots. I imagine the way to tell may differ slightly depending on your rooting system, which is why I'm explaining mine. I pot the cutting in fresh seed-starting mix. I add a granulated 7-7-7 fertilizer and ...


7

The type of cutting you are talking about is mostly likely called a truncheon. Some trees will grow from this kind of cutting VERY well. Others not so well or not at all. A truncheon is usually a 3 foot long stem or branch as thick as your forearm. You denude the truncheon, then let is season for a day or two in the shade so the ends dry out (necessary to ...


7

Yes, Mint is one of the most responsive plants to use by cutting. Cut just above a set of opposite leaves and 3-4 in. down from that for one cutting. Mint is very invasive, as long as you provide the right conditions it should continually be the same as the previous cutting. Just cut the flowers off and don't let it go to seed, this would go from cloning to ...


7

I bought this rose at rite aid on clearance two years ago. We put it in water, and the stem never turned brown. After about 9 months in a glass of water, I put it in soil. It grew a bunch of new branches, and about two weeks ago I saw a bud. I took this photo this morning. So, for people who say it can't re-root or grow new flowers, they are wrong! This is ...


7

From personal experience, I'd disagree with the statement that rooting hormones are ineffective, but it depends what you're using it for. I prefer the powder formulation to gels or liquids because there seems to be less chance of rot with the powder, and it has a longer shelf life, but essentially, rooting hormone preparations contain a chemical formula that,...


6

Bamboo's answer is good. I agree with everything stated there, just wanted to add the method I used when I did this years ago. I recut the cut ends (flat, and clean), but then topped the stems off (they were really long, so removed about half), leaving them at 9-10 inches. I cut about 1/4" above a large healthy leaf. Then I removed the leaves halfway up the ...


6

It will grow fine. I ran some tests (slightly less scientifically than I could have, but got results) on grafting/propagation via cuttings using scions/cuttings from vigorous seedlings, older determinate, and older indeterminate tomato plants. Surprisingly, the differences were small/unnoticeable. The cuttings and grafts from the old determinate plants ...


6

There are two basic varieties of Epipremnum, or Pothos (Devils' Ivy in the UK, and often still referred to as Scindapsis, its original Latin name) - one is variegated and the other is plain green. These days there are a range of variegated ones, but the basic species is either variegated or non variegated. The variegated ones like more light, and if they are ...


6

Hardwood cuttings work best for mulberry; though you haven't said which variety of Acer you're trying to propagate,softwood cuttings are more likely to be successful,or from seed. Softwood cuttings are taken earlier in the year, around May or June in the northern hemisphere - more info on that here http://homeguides.sfgate.com/propagate-red-maples-23902.html ...


5

I had a hardwood branch break off from my lilac branch and stuck it in water. No rooting hormone. It is now growing roots.


5

I wish the picture was clearer, but that side shoot looks a bit thin and weak. Roses root easily from cuttings, but you need a stem that either hasn't flowered, or all the flowers have gone, and it should be a young shoot, feeling firm and turgid and usually a bit thicker than that side shoot, more the thickness of the main stem in the picture. They also ...


5

You can't beat RHS (Royal Horticultural Society) publications if you're in the UK - there's one called RHS Propagating Plants by Alan Toogood (available on Amazon), also RHS Handbook: Propagation Techniques, again available at Amazon, also available as a Kindle download.


5

Quick take them out of the water! Like most succulents they root by making a clean cut at the root end with a sharp knife or razor and letting it sit on the windowsill for a week or so. Then, once the wound has dried, place in damp sand and high light. Keeping sand damp is harder than it seems. Wet is no good, dry does not encourage roots. Do not cover ...


5

Having tried this (unsuccessfully) with "spring cuttings" (friends were moving and leaving their house with cherry tree, so it was then or never) my research into it suggested taking cuttings in the fall and letting them develop roots over the winter as being much more likely to succeed. As such, while you certainly could try to pack in damp newspaper and ...


5

Very much so. I have done similar cuts many times on cacti and succulents. If you cleanly cut off the top 6 inches or so and pot it up it should root quite easily. And then remove all but the bottom 6 inches and leave it to regrow and you will have two lovely cacti!


5

I've never bothered with drying them. I just plonk them vertically in some sandy soil - I may need to prop them up at first until roots grow. Then they will grow. It might take a while - cacti are slow growing, and it has to grow roots first. Ideally I try to take a cutting that has some buds - then you will see growth more quickly. The existing buds will ...


5

I've propagated a lot of prickly pear. They root easily and grow roots faster than most cactus. You could just stick it in soil a few days after cutting, forget about it, and it will most likely grow roots. That being said, it's best to give the cactus more than a few days for the wound to heal, a fresh cut is more susceptible to disease or fungus. I ...


5

Try this one; drunkard cactus, little bottles Let's see if this name works for this plant. I like the drunkard part because it looks like lots of little bottles...grins!


5

I'm dubious of the premise, but sure, give it a try. When looking into some of the more extreme propagation methods for another question, https://gardening.stackexchange.com/a/29992/6806 I found a description of a setup where bottom heat was employed to encourage rooting while the tops were kept cold to prevent them from deciding to leaf out before there ...


5

If you only did it a couple of weeks ago, that was a bit late for a hardwood cutting. You can follow Stormy's instructions regarding this particular cutting to give it a second chance, but you can also propagate Hydrangea from soft or semi ripe cuttings as well as hardwood, see link here, under propagation, which has secondary embedded links regarding how to ...


5

The white tufts around the cactus's needles are typical, especially because you said its been there for over 5 years. Mealy bugs congragate usually groups and don't evenly spaced on a plant's surface. The pot is too dried out and has a hard time retaining water. I use a trick very sparingly to rehydrate soil, especially succulents and cactus. Take a bowl ...


5

I am confused what you mean by storage. If you intend to hold these cuttings briefly for sale or shipping within the dormancy period simply wrapping in damp paper towels, then wrapping the bundle loosely - and not air tight - in plastic and placing in a refrigerator should yield good results. If the refrigerator has a "produce" bin which controls the ...


5

Check the customs regulations of the country you are going to before you try. What you are allowed to take across international boundaries varies from country to country. It would be a waste to take the cuttings only to have them confiscated (and you potentially fined) if they were not permitted. If permitted, and put into a sealed plastic bag with a ...


5

Air layering is used when the stem cannot be easily bent down to the ground for ordinary layering. Both types of layering recognize that some plants are hard to root and will root more easily if instead of cutting from the plant and taking the risk that the cutting will not produce roots we leave it attached to continue growing. The host plant then performs ...


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